Win Japanese Resources By Telling Us Your Favorites

It’s been about a month since we launched our “Japanese Resources Page” – on it we say things like “blah-didy-blah japanese resource this that etc” but we thought it would be fun for you guys if we just put our money where our mouths are. Not all the resources on the Japanese Resources page are free (some of them are, though, and they’re awesome), so we thought we’d give you some of the paid ones using cash from our very own Scrooge McDuck gold coin swimming pools (that way you don’t have to). We have a lot of cool resources to give away, too.

How To Win (It’s Suspiciously Easy)

On our Japanese Resources page, we have “recommend” buttons. They look like this:

The cool thing about these is that they’re linked to Facebook, meaning only real people can “recommend” something. Although individual items will get fewer votes by using Facebook (I’m guessing), the idea is that each “recommendation” will have a lot more umph behind it. Real people are recommending these resources, and I think people will be pickier about what they choose. That’s awesome, I think. You can really get an idea already what’s a great resource out there, just based off this (though some newer stuff has fewer recommendations).

We’re greedy fugus over here, though, so we want to bribe you to give some recommendations on this page (if you haven’t already). Here’s how to enter the contest.

  1. Make sure you have a Facebook account (big sorries if you don’t!)
  2. Go to the Japanese Resources page on Tofugu.
  3. Recommend one or more resources by hitting the “recommend” button. Pick your favorites! The ones you’d actually recommend to someone else for their awesome-ness.
  4. Come back here and leave a comment, telling us what you recommended and why. Be sure to add your email in the email field when doing your comment, that’s how we’ll contact you if you win something.
  5. Hope for the best. There are a couple different ways you can win something (and a bunch of prizes, see below), but we’ll start giving stuff out next week.

Quick, easy, and helps out both of us, I think (especially if you win something). More importantly, it will help others to find great Japanese resources, based off of your recommendations. You’re changing people’s minds! 0_0

Prizes

Out of our own linty pockets we’re providing prizes. Some of the prizes are ours, some are others – there’s a good mix of stuff going on, here, with different ways to win them, depending on what they are.

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What: TextFugu “Forever” Subscription
How:
We’ll pick one comment at random, below.

TextFugu is Tofugu’s online Japanese textbook. It’s made specifically for self-learners of Japanese (sorry classrooms, businesses, and the FBI) and tries to make sure you don’t hit any of the pitfalls of learning Japanese on your own (losing motivation, getting stuck, etc). We’ll be giving away one forever (lifetime!) subscription to one lucky (and hoopy) frood.

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What: Lifetime Subscription to MangoLanguages Japanese
How:
We’ll pick one comment at random, below.

Mango Languages is a great way to learning quick, practical Japanese really quickly. If you’re one of those people who don’t want to bother with all the fancy linguistic aspects of a language and just want to learn how to ask for directions, make small talk, or order at a restaurant, Mango Languages is for you.

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What: 1 Year Subscription to Lang-8’s Premium Program
How:
We’ll pick one comment at random, below.

Lang-8 is a social network that focuses on language exchange. You write journal entries in the language you’re learning (Japanese?) and then Japanese native speakers will correct your journal entries using a cool correction tool (that helps you learn from your mistakes). Normally Lang-8 is free, but there’s also a great Premium version of the site (I’m a subscriber, actually, it’s nice). We’ll be giving away a single one year subscription to one lucky winner.

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What: Forever Subscription To Gakuu
How:
We’ll pick someone at random out of people who mention in their comment that they’re intermediate / advanced!

Gakuu is a site that puts out regular lessons based off of real (raw) Japanese (we’re talking signs, letters, etc… things that are real Japanese used in reality in Japan). This service is more for intermediate / advanced students of Japanese, so we’ll try to pick someone who can use Gakuu effectively (so it doesn’t go to waste!).

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What: 1 Year Subscription to ReadTheKanji
How:
Recommend a kanji related resource and we’ll pick someone at random from that pool of people

ReadTheKanji is a really effective, interesting way to practice kanji. It uses vocab to show you different kanji, and based off your answers rates the individual kanji within the vocab to help you to study what you aren’t very good at. It’s a great tool for all levels! One lucky kanji-loving commenter will get a one year subscription to this service.

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What: Ultimate Nouns (1&2), Adjectives, and Verbs Vocab Packs
How:
One out of five recommenders/commenters will get this prize (those are pretty good odds)!

The “Ultimate Japanese Vocab” packs are some of the first things to appear in our (somewhat) secret Tofugu Store (shh, hasn’t been announced yet). These packs give you the 200 most common verbs, the 200 most common adjectives, and the first 200 most common nouns. By learning vocab in the right order, you’re making sure that you get the most bang for your Japanese-vocab-learning-buck, meaning you get to use the Japanese you learn a lot faster. These “packs” consist of an Anki deck and a pdf+excel file with all the words, their meanings, kanji verison, kana version, and so on.

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What: Ultimate Nouns #1 Pack
How:
“Recommend” something on the Japanese Resources Page then Comment. Everyone wins!

This is just the Ultimate Nouns Pack (not all four of the currently available ones). it consists of the 100 most common Japanese nouns, and is a great way to get started on your Japanese vocabulary. By learning these words you’re sure to learn the most useful words in the Japanese language. That’s pretty awesome. Everyone who does the Facebook Recommend on the Japanese Resources page and then comments here telling us your #1 recommendation on that list wins themselves a pack of Nouns (Anki deck + PDF/Excel file). Hooray for winning! Tiger Blood!

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Rules

There you have it. Odds are really good on some of these, not as good on others. There are some rules, though:

  1. You have to recommend something on the Japanese Resource Page first (that means you need a Facebook account to recommend with).
  2. We’ll only count one comment from each person, below (so don’t spam comments… we know your IP address! Be nice to others!)
  3. We’ll try to make sure one person doesn’t win more than one prize (besides the Ultimate Vocab packs, because everyone wins one of those, at least!).
  4. We’ll start giving things away a week from now. That’s August 8th. Probably won’t get everything out on that day, but expect to start hearing from us then (and the rest of that week). Make sure you put your email in correctly while leaving your comment, otherwise we won’t be able ot get ahold of you :(
  5. Comments that are particularly entertaining / well written / etc may or may not get two entries into the “random choosing pool.” Quality is king, ya’all.
  6. Also, tweeting / liking / G+ing this post may or may not also help you out. Probably won’t, but just sayin’, you know?

That’s it – get to it if you want to get to it! Let us know if you have any questions, too.


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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1653687465 Matěj Voslař

    I recommended Anki. I think there isn’t a better way to learn my vocabulary. And for the finding of Anki I am grateful to tofugu, so it’s only fair to link back to this website ^^ I also told my friends on IRC and they like Anki too.
    msamyel@gmail.com

  • Peeter

    Picked Anki and Rikaichan. Anki’s a really neat flash card program that works nicely and Rikaichan is just very useful.

  • Anonymous

    My recommendations:

    Tae Kim`s  guide to learning japanese: Excellent for learning grammar from a japanese perspective way which help us understand the japanese culture in a better way. It also come with excersises and answers so you can know if you really understood the lesson. Great resource and it is translated in different languages! ^_^!

    Genki: There are a totall of 5 genki Books (2 with lessons, 2 workboos and 1 book with answers for all the excercises) It also comes with audios for the lessons books and the workbooks. It is a really useful material for self-learners. It also has nice pictures (I can`t see myself studying from a book without pictures or drawings because I am a very visual person).

    Anki: Really good resources for learning vocabulary and expressions. It suports images, sound and text wich allow to create really interesting a complete study cards. you can make your own decks or find decks other people studying the same have already made. With anki you review more the items you have more difficulties with, which is a great way to improve your retention.

    Japanese Graded Readers: It is not in the tofugu recommende resources page, but I think it should be added. There are diffrent levels and 3 volumes for each level. All the kanjis have furigana on them. It also comes with audios. Each volume have five mini-books with different stories. I am a big fan of greaded readers because it is so nice whe you reach certain level to be able to read a whole (eve though short) story in japanese that it boost your motivation and makes you feel that your studying is really paying off.

    I have a question about the e-mail thing: ¿Should I enter the comment as a “guest” so that you can see the e-mail?, ¿Or it is Ok the way I did it with the DISQUS account?

  • Animelover ( ^_^)o自自o(^_^ )

    wow O__O I’m sort of scared to say anything after going through that loooooong list of comments wouldn’t want to be the one going through it *coughhashiand/orkoichicough* anyway I recommended Textfugu because of how awesome it is at teaching and how much it makes sense I have been learning Greek with a teacher and, well, I know a lot more Japanese because of this textbook than I know Greek(I’ve been studying for three years already) oh and I especially love the funny little breaks you give us every once in a while like the I’m yours-kid on a ukulele, and Mr. Ando of the woods. I also like the game-ish resources you gave us, like Real Kana-I can actually practice hundreds of characters and still not be bored its amazing for someone with such a short attention span like me—(this is me)—> OTL I also like another resource that Textfugu introduced me to Usagi chan’s genki resource page:(http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/sheaa/projects/genki/index.html) and also I lastly recommended anki just because of all the stuff you could do with it. (ps. I recommended Anki in real life to my sister after I told her about learning Japanese with Textfugu and how cool it was, and she was totally jealous, sulking a little later saying “why can’t they do that for Chinese” she’s trying to learn Chinese with a teacher and sometimes gets really frustrated 

  • Ziern

    It’s not on the list, but I recommend http://translate.google.com/ as a helping tool to quickly translate some Japanese that you encounter during your learning.
    Again, it’s just a tool and not really a source for learning a language, but it has helped me a lot to communicate with language-exchange-partners.
    It helps them saying things in English, and it helps me understanding what they are trying to say.

    Keep in mind though that it often can be very inaccurate, or make you go lazy and just translate things instead of learning them, but it has helped me so much with staying in touch with friends that I just had to recommend it here.
    If I sense it’s telling me something inaccurate I can most of the times split sentences up, just translate the kanji’s or move words around a bit to get the general jist of the meaning.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=628203670 Jennings Jin

    I gotta say, I love

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=628203670 Jennings Jin

    Somehow that posted…. I like mango a lot because it moves quickly and because if you have a library, it’s easy to access. It’s kind of basic as far as learning methods go, but what works works right? Also Mangoes are tasty.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=628203670 Jennings Jin

    Somehow that posted…. I like mango a lot because it moves quickly and because if you have a library, it’s easy to access. It’s kind of basic as far as learning methods go, but what works works right? Also Mangoes are tasty.

  • remichan

    I recommended Tae Kim’s Guide as well as Rikaichan. Although all the resources have their merits, I find that these are the ones I use the most often. Tae Kim’s Guide is just such a richly extensive grammar resource. The fact that it’s basically a free online textbook always amazes me. It’s also offered as a free app which is fabulous as well. I love that it completely does away with romaji, eliminating the use of them as a crutch, which is always a bonus while learning Japanese. Tae Kim’s Guide does have a mouse over feature to help with this, however, Rikaichan takes it up another level.

    Rikaichan is fantastic to use at the same time. Rikaichan is more like a tool to use with the other online Japanese learning resources. It works so well in tandem to supplement your learning progress. It gives more detailed definitions than the Tae Kim mouse overs along with a list of possible translations that you can choose from based on the context of your text. I love how clean and organized the add-on is. It’s very streamlined, fast, easy to read, convenient, and doesn’t feel invasive even as a pop-up.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Christopher-Bearden/100002526018793 Christopher Bearden

    1) Genki – Although it maybe expensive the way it is written makes it very good for self learners.

    2) Remembering the Kanji – for its relatively basic and relatively easy way to under stand kanji and and its meaning from the simple Kanji to the more complex Kanji

    3) Realkana – a really simple and useful flash card site for reviewing Hiragana and Katakana.

    4)Tofugu’s Cheat Sheets – I could do all these individually but then you would have to read a wall of text for each he he he. One of the most helpful resources you can find around for aiding your learning of the language be it hiragana, katakana or the particles.  This would be my number one choice for study aids.

    (Email: christopher.bearden@live.com)

  • http://www.facebook.com/danielnyecarter Daniel Carter

    I recommended:

    Tae Kim’s Guide to Japanese – Such a great resource for Japanese enthusiasts of any level. Teaches Japanese grammar points in a very easy to follow manner.

    Anki – This is something everyone should use, kind of the obligatory recommendation.

    ReadTheKanji – I just really enjoy using read the Kanji, plus, when I get Kanji I don’t know I can use them to make an Anki deck, works so well!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1529417101 Josiah Fam

    I like to use Text fugu. It’s a great textbook to help learn Japanese. I also  use Anki Deck to learn too. I also like this site http://memrise.com The site is like a game for learning a language Its sort of like IKnow for free. :) I used it to learn my JP Vocab. So far I have  learned 1,000+ vocab words in a week. :D

  • Anonymous

    I recommended Japanese for Busy People. It is a bit business focussed, but having looked at loads of Japanese text books, this one seemed to do things in a sensible order and cover a lot of the basics. My only regret is buying the romaji version and not the kana version – I’d definitely have done that if I could to force me to learn hiragana and katakana!

    I haven’t tried Anki yet, but I’m probably going to download it today given all the comments here!

    (E-mail: simon at simonssite.com)

  • Anonymous

    I recommended Japanese for Busy People. It is a bit business focussed, but having looked at loads of Japanese text books, this one seemed to do things in a sensible order and cover a lot of the basics. My only regret is buying the romaji version and not the kana version – I’d definitely have done that if I could to force me to learn hiragana and katakana!

    I haven’t tried Anki yet, but I’m probably going to download it today given all the comments here!

    (E-mail: simon at simonssite.com)

  • Katie Jones

    I like textfugu because it keeps you motivated by making learning japanese fun (ie: the “Studying your passion”  chapter) and stops you from getting stuck/quitting.

    I think that textfugu had an overdose of pure awesome.

  • Fred Stiller

    I would say that for me the association of  Genki/Learn the Kanji/Anki is the magic formula to learn efficiently japanese. Those 3 resources combined are really great !!

  • Em.Am

    I learned to read hiragana & katakana thanks to the Textfugu charts. I have both of them featured in my Japanese Language Log (which is on my Evernote. It’s easy to throw everything in Evernote & it’s always there when you’re ready to study ^~^ ).

    The three sources I use the most right now are Denshi Jisho, Tae Kim’s Guide, and (free) Textfugu. Denshi Jisho allows me to find words that my beginner’s dictionary doesn’t have. I can read the word in the context of a sentence as well as look up the kanji components, which is convenient along with my Japanese Kanji and Kana book since additional details include which Kanji number it is. I am using Tae Kim’s Guide as a Japanese booster along with the free Textfugu before I invest in the forever plan. Between the two, Tae Kim has more examples while Textfugu is more personable.

    I like Anki because it actually encourages me to learn vocab (by leeching off of other people’s hard work) and it vaguely reminds me of a free version of the-website-currently-known-as-iKnow.

    RealKana initially helped me recognize hiragana faster, but now I use it to practice typing with a “Japanese keyboard”. There are games out there for that purpose, but RealKana helps develop muscle memory so I don’t have to look at the chart I have next to my computer that identifies which kana goes where.
     
    NihonShock’s Ultimate Cheat Sheet is just that: a cheat sheet that is ultimate. It’s a great reference, but it alone cannot teach you.

    I recommend Japanese the Manga Way for an intermediate student because you need a strong foundation before it can help you. I bought this book before I really started to use other sources, so I could only get about a dozen chapters in before I got lost. The way each example is broken down explains anything that may cause you to wonder. 
    This is longer than I planned. But I hope it helps someone :)

  • Carol Kollen

    Hi ! ^.^ All of these resources look GREAT, but out of the ones I have tried so far, I would highly recommend Japanese For Busy People, Genki 1, and Japanese the Manga Way !  All three of these books provide a different aspect of learning Japanese for a visual learner like myself.  Japanese For Busy People gets you right into everyday words and phrases and forces you to learn and use kana right away, and the exercises allow for the repetition I need for memoriation.  The book comes with a cd and you can hear the target dialogue, so it can be used even if you are not able to practice verbally with another person.  Genki 1 also has a lot of exercises and drawings to show  when and how to use the vocab and featured phrases. The format is easy to understand, and not too overwhelming for the beginner. Japanese the Manga Way is the ultimate for learning visually, especially if  you are already famliar with reading manga in English.  I like using the first two books together with this one !  

  • Cerobi

    Yah! Contest~

    After following kemuschican’s channel on youtube, reading reviews, and stalking the site itself as much as possible without actually buying anything, I’d say Textfugu.com is my #1 recommendation. As someone who has been trying to learn Japanese on my own for 3 years (and sadly has not gotten very far), it seems to be the godsend self-learners didn’t know they were looking for! Had I found this 3 years ago, I can’t imagine the amount of progress I would have made. It’s an entire community dedicated to learning Japanese. Simply wonderful.

    That said, I also recommended readthekanji.com as a #2, because one of the biggest reasons I haven’t gotten far in learning is the seemingly daunting task of learning kanji (though I just read the article on what not to do and will restart with some radicals asap!). There seemed to be so much, and so I shied away from the task. Readthekanji (the free account) has begun to make the journey much easier!

    I also recommended realkana.com (which also has a realkanji.com sister site!) and anki. Both are wonderful interactive memory resources any beginner learning Japanese should take full advantage of.

  • Deanneblue

    Anki is great because it is like flashcards but better because it helps you with using the ones you are worst at more and the ones you know like the back of you hand are show less.

  • Mark B.

    Mango Languages gets the job done, and is cheap, depending on where you live. A lot of libraries buy the program like mine did and make it available for free. Mango is great for travelers, as you start off just readily usable phrases instead of grammar points. A cool feature in mango is the ability to practice pronunciation side by side the native speaker audio track. You can record your voice with a microphone and then look at how the actual wavelength/amplitude compares to your recording. Another helpful aspect of mango is the color coded grammar parts that match the meanings of both the english and japanese sentences. This cleared a lot of the confusion about sentence order that I previously had.

  • http://www.tofugu.com/ Hashi

    About the email: You did it just fine, we got your email address :)

  • John

    What college do you go to? That’s the same series we used at Ohio State.

  • Lena

    He’s a Japanese language teacher at Ritsumeikan, and since I did a 1 year exchange there I met him :D:D It was so exciting!

  • Anonymous

    I recommend Japanese the Manga way. It’s the most helpful book I’ve come across. Japanese for Busy People was good, but a little too repetitive in the exercises. Japanese the Manga Way gives you everything you need to know. I encouraged my friend to buy it too and she likes it. Very useful book. ^.^

  • jacq

    I recommending the following things:

    – TextFugu (Of course): As a self-learner, it’s the only resource I’ve found that keeps me motivated and interested.  I especially like the method for learning kanji with ridiculous stories – I was skeptical at first, but it really works amazingly well!
    – Anki and AnkiMobile: I use this program everyday (especially on my iPhone) to practice the flash card sets from TextFugu.  Having the audio really helps me remember the words, and having it on my iPhone means I never have an excuse not to fit in some study.
    – JapanesePod101: I use this for practice understanding dialogue, and I used to really enjoy the podcasts, but I think in the more recent seasons, they have lost some of their personality, so I guess I especially recommend the earliest seasons.
    – Kotoba: Great Japanese dictionary – for free!
    -TextFugu’s Hiragana and Katakana charts: Great when you are just starting out learning kana.

    While I was looking through the resources I downloaded the following charts I hadn’t seen before, because they looked great (and you can never have too many charts)!

    – NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet
    – Tofugu’s Japanese Particles Cheatsheet
    – Conjugation Cheatsheet

    Thanks!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Caroline-Elizabeth-Robinson/681638783 Caroline Elizabeth Robinson

    Tae Kim’s Guide was my recommendation. Not only is it free, but it is miraculous at working it’s way into the brain. It covers everything, from complex verb tenses to simple particles. I still remember stuff I learned on that site from three years ago, crystal clear. If you haven’t checked it out yet, Tae Kim is the way to go!

  • http://profiles.google.com/shahiirosan shahiir mizune

    tae kim’s…….the site’s ounds an look cool

  • http://profiles.google.com/dbn001 Daniel Bruno

    I really like RhinoSpike! The best audio resource!

  • Anonymous

    definitely JapanesePod101 :D!!!
    why?
    first, it’s mostly about listening
    聴解is really what i think is hardest when learning japanese.
    i always misunderstood people’s intention if they speak too fast.
    and that is why, listening would be more important for people who don’t really watch jap dramas or watch anime.
    I do watch anime now, but still, it is always better to learn the more polite way, which we call the ますけいbefore u learn anything that can be learned from animes.LOLXD
    and after i used japanese Pod 101 for the trail period, i think it’s really awesome to get to listen to people speaking japanese in a very practical way!!i mean, compared to other learning tools that have free conversations for u to listen from it, isn’t this so much more NATURAL?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2UMEDPM7FI4MFLNPPYYHLJT37E Guozhong Xu

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  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Jalm0905

    I recommended Kotoba, Lang-8 and Japanese the Manga Way. Kotoba is a great app to have. You can use it on your iPod anywhere you go without WiFi so don’t worry about killing yourself just to find a location with free WiFi like McDonald’s. it’s great for searching various amounts of kanji, including how to right them and their onyomi and kunyomi readings. Lang-8 is perfect for asking native Japanese speakers questions about the language. They will correct your attempts to writing  in Japanese and you can help them with whatever language their learning like English. Who doesn’t love helping others? If you don’t, you’re heartless soul. Lastly, Japanese the Manga Way is simply a book that teaches you various concepts in the language of Japanese the Manga Way. I’m sure many of you love to look at pictures or read manga, especially manga about Japanese. It gives you explanations about many topics and you will definitely learn from it. 

    Email: jalm0905@verizon.net

  • Jalm0905

    I recommended Kotoba, Lang-8 and Japanese the Manga Way. Kotoba is a great app to have. You can use it on your iPod anywhere you go without WiFi so don’t worry about killing yourself just to find a location with free WiFi like McDonald’s. it’s great for searching various amounts of kanji, including how to right them and their onyomi and kunyomi readings. Lang-8 is perfect for asking native Japanese speakers questions about the language. They will correct your attempts to writing  in Japanese and you can help them with whatever language their learning like English. Who doesn’t love helping others? If you don’t, you’re heartless soul. Lastly, Japanese the Manga Way is simply a book that teaches you various concepts in the language of Japanese the Manga Way. I’m sure many of you love to look at pictures or read manga, especially manga about Japanese. It gives you explanations about many topics and you will definitely learn from it. 

    Email: jalm0905@verizon.net

  • Jalm0905

    Oh also Kotoba and Lang-8 are FREE resources. i know everyone loves the word free, so hopefully you’ll use them like I do.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=897300242 Andy Hong

    Tae Kim’s Japanese resource is great for polishing up on Japanese grammar. The contents are well-structured: each page contains all the possible forms for a particular grammar construct, so, for example, all the ways of creating the negative form of a word are all listed in one place. This is in contrast to most other resources, that will scatter this information across arbitrary “beginner-intermediate-advanced” categories.

    Denshi Jisho is a great springboard to start any search from. It supports romaji input, contains sentence examples, links to other dictionaries and search engines, and also provides search engine plugins for Firefox.

    RealKana helped me ace my Hiragana and Katakana tests in university after just 4 hours of use (not in one session, of course).

    Rikaichan (and its Chrome port, Rikai-kun) are just so, so easy to use. Hover over any Japanese word or phrase and see its meaning right away. What more can one ask for? Here’s an additional tip: You can use Rikaichan in plain-text documents as well, just open the document using Firefox (by dragging them from Windows Explorer to a Firefox window, for example).

    There’s no love to be had for Android users within the resources! I’m personally using these apps:
    JED – Japanese-English Dictionary for Android : http://www.umibouzu.com/jed/
    AnyMemo – Flashcard learning app : http://anymemo.org/

  • Tompe99

    WHO WON???

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    A bunch of folks! We emailed the winners about a week after this article was posted up.

  • Hisuke

    I just realised that these are all haikus. I’m a bit slow…