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It’s been about a month since we launched our “Japanese Resources Page” – on it we say things like “blah-didy-blah japanese resource this that etc” but we thought it would be fun for you guys if we just put our money where our mouths are. Not all the resources on the Japanese Resources page are free (some of them are, though, and they’re awesome), so we thought we’d give you some of the paid ones using cash from our very own Scrooge McDuck gold coin swimming pools (that way you don’t have to). We have a lot of cool resources to give away, too.

How To Win (It’s Suspiciously Easy)

On our Japanese Resources page, we have “recommend” buttons. They look like this:

The cool thing about these is that they’re linked to Facebook, meaning only real people can “recommend” something. Although individual items will get fewer votes by using Facebook (I’m guessing), the idea is that each “recommendation” will have a lot more umph behind it. Real people are recommending these resources, and I think people will be pickier about what they choose. That’s awesome, I think. You can really get an idea already what’s a great resource out there, just based off this (though some newer stuff has fewer recommendations).

We’re greedy fugus over here, though, so we want to bribe you to give some recommendations on this page (if you haven’t already). Here’s how to enter the contest.

  1. Make sure you have a Facebook account (big sorries if you don’t!)
  2. Go to the Japanese Resources page on Tofugu.
  3. Recommend one or more resources by hitting the “recommend” button. Pick your favorites! The ones you’d actually recommend to someone else for their awesome-ness.
  4. Come back here and leave a comment, telling us what you recommended and why. Be sure to add your email in the email field when doing your comment, that’s how we’ll contact you if you win something.
  5. Hope for the best. There are a couple different ways you can win something (and a bunch of prizes, see below), but we’ll start giving stuff out next week.

Quick, easy, and helps out both of us, I think (especially if you win something). More importantly, it will help others to find great Japanese resources, based off of your recommendations. You’re changing people’s minds! 0_0

Prizes

Out of our own linty pockets we’re providing prizes. Some of the prizes are ours, some are others – there’s a good mix of stuff going on, here, with different ways to win them, depending on what they are.

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What: TextFugu “Forever” Subscription
How:
We’ll pick one comment at random, below.

TextFugu is Tofugu’s online Japanese textbook. It’s made specifically for self-learners of Japanese (sorry classrooms, businesses, and the FBI) and tries to make sure you don’t hit any of the pitfalls of learning Japanese on your own (losing motivation, getting stuck, etc). We’ll be giving away one forever (lifetime!) subscription to one lucky (and hoopy) frood.

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What: Lifetime Subscription to MangoLanguages Japanese
How:
We’ll pick one comment at random, below.

Mango Languages is a great way to learning quick, practical Japanese really quickly. If you’re one of those people who don’t want to bother with all the fancy linguistic aspects of a language and just want to learn how to ask for directions, make small talk, or order at a restaurant, Mango Languages is for you.

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What: 1 Year Subscription to Lang-8’s Premium Program
How:
We’ll pick one comment at random, below.

Lang-8 is a social network that focuses on language exchange. You write journal entries in the language you’re learning (Japanese?) and then Japanese native speakers will correct your journal entries using a cool correction tool (that helps you learn from your mistakes). Normally Lang-8 is free, but there’s also a great Premium version of the site (I’m a subscriber, actually, it’s nice). We’ll be giving away a single one year subscription to one lucky winner.

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What: Forever Subscription To Gakuu
How:
We’ll pick someone at random out of people who mention in their comment that they’re intermediate / advanced!

Gakuu is a site that puts out regular lessons based off of real (raw) Japanese (we’re talking signs, letters, etc… things that are real Japanese used in reality in Japan). This service is more for intermediate / advanced students of Japanese, so we’ll try to pick someone who can use Gakuu effectively (so it doesn’t go to waste!).

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What: 1 Year Subscription to ReadTheKanji
How:
Recommend a kanji related resource and we’ll pick someone at random from that pool of people

ReadTheKanji is a really effective, interesting way to practice kanji. It uses vocab to show you different kanji, and based off your answers rates the individual kanji within the vocab to help you to study what you aren’t very good at. It’s a great tool for all levels! One lucky kanji-loving commenter will get a one year subscription to this service.

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What: Ultimate Nouns (1&2), Adjectives, and Verbs Vocab Packs
How:
One out of five recommenders/commenters will get this prize (those are pretty good odds)!

The “Ultimate Japanese Vocab” packs are some of the first things to appear in our (somewhat) secret Tofugu Store (shh, hasn’t been announced yet). These packs give you the 200 most common verbs, the 200 most common adjectives, and the first 200 most common nouns. By learning vocab in the right order, you’re making sure that you get the most bang for your Japanese-vocab-learning-buck, meaning you get to use the Japanese you learn a lot faster. These “packs” consist of an Anki deck and a pdf+excel file with all the words, their meanings, kanji verison, kana version, and so on.

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What: Ultimate Nouns #1 Pack
How:
“Recommend” something on the Japanese Resources Page then Comment. Everyone wins!

This is just the Ultimate Nouns Pack (not all four of the currently available ones). it consists of the 100 most common Japanese nouns, and is a great way to get started on your Japanese vocabulary. By learning these words you’re sure to learn the most useful words in the Japanese language. That’s pretty awesome. Everyone who does the Facebook Recommend on the Japanese Resources page and then comments here telling us your #1 recommendation on that list wins themselves a pack of Nouns (Anki deck + PDF/Excel file). Hooray for winning! Tiger Blood!

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Rules

There you have it. Odds are really good on some of these, not as good on others. There are some rules, though:

  1. You have to recommend something on the Japanese Resource Page first (that means you need a Facebook account to recommend with).
  2. We’ll only count one comment from each person, below (so don’t spam comments… we know your IP address! Be nice to others!)
  3. We’ll try to make sure one person doesn’t win more than one prize (besides the Ultimate Vocab packs, because everyone wins one of those, at least!).
  4. We’ll start giving things away a week from now. That’s August 8th. Probably won’t get everything out on that day, but expect to start hearing from us then (and the rest of that week). Make sure you put your email in correctly while leaving your comment, otherwise we won’t be able ot get ahold of you :(
  5. Comments that are particularly entertaining / well written / etc may or may not get two entries into the “random choosing pool.” Quality is king, ya’all.
  6. Also, tweeting / liking / G+ing this post may or may not also help you out. Probably won’t, but just sayin’, you know?

That’s it – get to it if you want to get to it! Let us know if you have any questions, too.


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  • Metalkarachi

    I love Anki- if you’re lazy you can steal someone else’s hard work for FREE or go wild creating your own.  The personal satisfaction after creating the sexy cards makes you desperate to start learning them… go Anki, GO!

  • Metalkarachi

    I love Anki- if you’re lazy you can steal someone else’s hard work for FREE or go wild creating your own.  The personal satisfaction after creating the sexy cards makes you desperate to start learning them… go Anki, GO!

  • Metalkarachi

    I love Anki- if you’re lazy you can steal someone else’s hard work for FREE or go wild creating your own.  The personal satisfaction after creating the sexy cards makes you desperate to start learning them… go Anki, GO!

  • Metalkarachi

    I love Anki- if you’re lazy you can steal someone else’s hard work for FREE or go wild creating your own.  The personal satisfaction after creating the sexy cards makes you desperate to start learning them… go Anki, GO!

  • Natepd

    Textfugu because it’s pure awesome. And Anki, great for revising.

  • Natepd

    Textfugu because it’s pure awesome. And Anki, great for revising.

  • Csfergu

    I recommended Japanese the Manga Way. It is a great learning resource, that integrates humor to make learning a lot of fun.

  • Cuavsfan

    I highly recommend Lang-8 to anybody learning Japanese (or any language).  I’ve been using it basically since it started and it’s a great community and you can get out of it pretty much whatever you want.  If you have language questions you can get natives to answer them.  If you know enough to string a few sentences together you can do that and get corrections.  If you are more advanced and only need minor corrections to help things sound natural, it works for that too.  You can also learn a lot from other people’s entries, and correcting other entries can help boost your own abilities as well.  Plus it’s a fun way to connect with people all over the world who share an interest (language learning) with you.  If you’ve never tried it I encourage you to spend a few minutes and give it a shot.  I’m betting you’ll love it and it just might totally change the way you study Japanese.

  • Anonymous

    I picked TextFugu, because it has allowed me to learn a lot about Japanese in a relatively short amount of time. Also, Tae Kim, because I LOVE grammar, and it has a lot of little grammar tidbits that I’ve seen but not have been able to find an explanation for.

    Of course, Anki, because I use it every day and it helps to remember all of the languages I am learning (especially Japanese), and thanks to Koichi’s well-made decks, I get to hear the words too, as well as practice them in many different ways and categories.

    The last ones I recommended were Denshi Jisho and NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet; I use them ALL the time, whether I’m watching some Japanese shows or trying to read a book, or just checking something I’m writing, etc. I absolutely love how Denshi Jisho allows you to search by radical, as it is pretty easy to use and is extremely convenient. It’s also fun to see what the individual Kanji mean that are put together to form other words.

    I would have recommended Forvo, but I haven’t used it much for Japanese, so I don’t know exactly how great the selction of words is.

    (email: jonnie@jonniez.com)

  • Kirachan

    I recommended textfugu and rikaichan. Textfugu has helped me so much with my Japanese, I have been studying with it for 49 days straight (i have a chart on the wall) and my Japanese knowledge  has skyrocketed. The kanji learning method is incredibly practical and easy to understand, I know so many more kanji than I ever learned from 3 years of lessons in college. rikaichan is an incredibly useful tool for a quick look up. when I was conversing with my host family over email while on my honeymoon in Japan and I didnt get a word  I could quickly highlight it and keep reading. It can be over used and become a crutch, but if you keep yourself from overusing it then it is a very handy tool indeed. 

  • Kirachan

    I recommended textfugu and rikaichan. Textfugu has helped me so much with my Japanese, I have been studying with it for 49 days straight (i have a chart on the wall) and my Japanese knowledge  has skyrocketed. The kanji learning method is incredibly practical and easy to understand, I know so many more kanji than I ever learned from 3 years of lessons in college. rikaichan is an incredibly useful tool for a quick look up. when I was conversing with my host family over email while on my honeymoon in Japan and I didnt get a word  I could quickly highlight it and keep reading. It can be over used and become a crutch, but if you keep yourself from overusing it then it is a very handy tool indeed. 

  • Anonymous

    I picked TextFugu, because it has allowed me to learn a lot about Japanese in a relatively short amount of time. Also, Tae Kim, because I LOVE grammar, and it has a lot of little grammar tidbits that I’ve seen but not have been able to find an explanation for.

    Of course, Anki, because I use it every day and it helps to remember all of the languages I am learning (especially Japanese), and thanks to Koichi’s well-made decks, I get to hear the words too, as well as practice them in many different ways and categories.

    The last ones I recommended were Denshi Jisho and NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet; I use them ALL the time, whether I’m watching some Japanese shows or trying to read a book, or just checking something I’m writing, etc. I absolutely love how Denshi Jisho allows you to search by radical, as it is pretty easy to use and is extremely convenient. It’s also fun to see what the individual Kanji mean that are put together to form other words.

    I would have recommended Forvo, but I haven’t used it much for Japanese, so I don’t know exactly how great the selction of words is.

    (email: jonnie@jonniez.com)

  • Anonymous

    I picked TextFugu, because it has allowed me to learn a lot about Japanese in a relatively short amount of time. Also, Tae Kim, because I LOVE grammar, and it has a lot of little grammar tidbits that I’ve seen but not have been able to find an explanation for.

    Of course, Anki, because I use it every day and it helps to remember all of the languages I am learning (especially Japanese), and thanks to Koichi’s well-made decks, I get to hear the words too, as well as practice them in many different ways and categories.

    The last ones I recommended were Denshi Jisho and NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet; I use them ALL the time, whether I’m watching some Japanese shows or trying to read a book, or just checking something I’m writing, etc. I absolutely love how Denshi Jisho allows you to search by radical, as it is pretty easy to use and is extremely convenient. It’s also fun to see what the individual Kanji mean that are put together to form other words.

    I would have recommended Forvo, but I haven’t used it much for Japanese, so I don’t know exactly how great the selction of words is.

    (email: jonnie@jonniez.com)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1287130299 Scott スコット Wallis

    Japanese for Busy People gets you learning conversational skills almost immediately, upon which you can build up more in depth knowledge. This is perfectly paired with Remembering the Kanji, which offers a simple way of learning Kanji which Japanese for Busy People does not include.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1287130299 Scott スコット Wallis

    Japanese for Busy People gets you learning conversational skills almost immediately, upon which you can build up more in depth knowledge. This is perfectly paired with Remembering the Kanji, which offers a simple way of learning Kanji which Japanese for Busy People does not include.

  • Rlgreen91

    I definitely agree with Metalkarachi for Anki, although I usually make my own decks. I love Tae Kim’s guide to Japanese grammar. It’s like, not as dry as most grammar textbooks, but at the same time, it’s great for learning basic grammar for daily use.  I really like Textfugu, as it’s organized in a no-nonsense manner, although I haven’t gotten around to purchasing the textbook. JapanesePod101 just for the podcasts.  The Tofugu vocab resources, just to get any of the essential vocab I might miss. Denshi Jisho for kanji diagrams, especially when it comes to stroke order. AJATT for inspiration and resources. About.com as well. All managed by handy rss feeder.

    Oh, and Google too.

  • Rlgreen91

    I definitely agree with Metalkarachi for Anki, although I usually make my own decks. I love Tae Kim’s guide to Japanese grammar. It’s like, not as dry as most grammar textbooks, but at the same time, it’s great for learning basic grammar for daily use.  I really like Textfugu, as it’s organized in a no-nonsense manner, although I haven’t gotten around to purchasing the textbook. JapanesePod101 just for the podcasts.  The Tofugu vocab resources, just to get any of the essential vocab I might miss. Denshi Jisho for kanji diagrams, especially when it comes to stroke order. AJATT for inspiration and resources. About.com as well. All managed by handy rss feeder.

    Oh, and Google too.

  • jabes

    I also recommend Anki, it makes it easier to practice learning characters on the go.  Simple and easy to use.

  • jabes

    I also recommend Anki, it makes it easier to practice learning characters on the go.  Simple and easy to use.

  • Cool Fusion

    I recommended Anki and Japanesepod101. Anki is obviously an easy way to build vocab, and Japanesepod increases my listening comprehension and has a lot of common words that simply aren’t in textbooks. (Also though its another online textbook- YesJapan has always been a great beginner resource I’ve never seen you review)

  • Rlgreen91

    Sorry, I meant to say that I would be purchasing the Ultimate “fill in the blank” lists

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1588780605 Mark Weber

    Wall
    of text incomming!

    I
    recommend TextFugu, RealKana, Rikaichan & Anki

    TextFugu;
    If you are going to start learning Japanese, definitely start
    here. The first few lessons are free, and on top of that, this site
    is made for self learners. Textbooks are so hard to get through, and
    to keep track of when you don’t have a teacher. That is why I think
    TextFugu is far superior than anything else
    -at least for beginners. The website has
    plenty of humor, and you will learn grammar with Yoda(do I have to
    say anything else?:P). When you have first started you will get some
    recommendations to a lot of good programs, which I will write a
    recommendation of below. This site is awesome, and it was how I got
    into Japanese. If you are considering the slightest to start, then
    start here. It is easy, it is free, and it is fun.

    Sadly
    it not all content which is free, but I would say that it is worth
    paying for :) I mean what would a teacher cost you a month?

    Realkana;
    Realkana is an easy little “game” you can play whenever you don’t
    have anything better to do. It will take
    you through Hiragana/katakana, and will
    display the Japanese character(kana), and then you have to write the
    sound it makes with our alphabet(romanji). Realkana can be set to
    include different types of writings, which improves your reading
    skill by a lot, since some of the writings are much different from
    what you initially learn. You need to learn how to read others
    handwriting, and this is a good place to start :)

    Anki;
    Anki is a program which wouldn’t be good
    without the introductions I got at TextFugu.
    The program can import a set of cards, which you can go through. On
    the cards there can be written あ,
    and then you have to remember which sound this kana makes(it is ”a”
    in this case). The cards can also include a sounds, so you can get
    your pronunciation right.

    Mainly Anki is used as revising of what you have already learned and it is really good at that :)

    I had some problems with the program when I first started, but it
    is really good, especially with the cards that textfugu gives you.

    Rikaichan;
    After first learning hiragana(the basic ”alphabet”) I wanted to
    browse the web, even though I did not know any words. I went to the
    Japanese google, and then realized that there was a lot that I didn’t
    even knew which sounds would make. I think that it in this case was
    検索(pronounced
    けんさく or
    kensaku) which means search. I was a bit disappointed, that after
    spending that much time learning hiragana, I couldn’t even go to a
    basic website and see which sounds the characters made.

    This
    changed when I found Rikaichan. It is a really cool program, which
    you use for your browser. After enabling it, you can hoover over any
    Japanese character, and it will translate it for you, and tell you
    how to pronounce it. It is very accurate, and I would say that it is
    about as good as Google translate, though it can only translate small
    amounts of text.

    Thanks for reading :)

  • Holly Muirhead

    I picked Textfugu as my number one recommendation for learning Japanese because it has helped me in so many ways that many other resources were unable to help me with. When I took Japanese in college, we only learned foreign loan words and no other vocabulary and did not learn how to form sentences or any grammatical matter at all. About the time I decided to get serious about learning Japanese in the long term and going to Japan for my career, I Textfugu came out and I started the free lessons to see how it was. I learned so much so quickly and very painlessly and I knew I had to sign up for a lifetime membership, so I did! :) Textfugu gives a very good foundation to build from and I have been using the other resources from that base. I am really thankful for it (and the motivation emails from Koichi!).

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Christopher-Gebczyk/1559297093 Christopher Gebczyk

    I recommended TextFugu because it is… mostly harmless.  ^_^

  • Flieg

    My recommendations:

    Rikaichan:

    A dictionary
    Quicker than any other
    At your fingertips

    ReadTheKanji:

    Troubles with kanji?
    Simply keep on answering
    And the problem’s gone

    JapanesePod101:

    Hundreds of lessons:
    Useful vocabulary
    And grammar explained

    Kotoba (iOS):

    No Wi-Fi around?
    Don’t be scared anymore
    Check the words offline

    And jfdi!

  • Jacob H.

    I recommended TextFugu. I chose TextFugu for many reasons. Therefore, I made a top ten list  of why I love it so.

    1.It’s awesome, I mean, the front page has a zombie on it….

    2. Simple and easy to read. There is no cluttered kanji going every which way. It has a tame font that is ultra easy to read, bold Japanese (not that ultra cluttered kanji you can find on Japanese newspapers such as The Japan Times), the layout is ultra easy, (no looking for that contact us button).

    3. Makers that actually care. The team of TextFugu seems more than welcome to answer any question you might want to ask. 

    4. Innovative, after all the ridiculously tedious attempts of teaching Japanese conventionally, (by learning strokes first), someone FINALLY decided to try something new, and it succeeded. 

    5. Community that cares, if you look at the forum, you will see there is at least 1 comment per post. If you happen to post and nobody is daring enough to post just email Koichi and problem solved.

    6. One time payment availability- ’bout time someone treats an online textbook like a real textbook. Most people don’t care to pay 20-60 dollars a year! Which brings me to my next choice…

    7. Not ridiculously priced. My siblings have college textbooks that cost more than TextFugu’s. And it will be outdated later.

    8. Up to date, no medieval Japanese here, there are updates.

    9. Guaranteed, someone out in TextFugu knows different methods are needed for different people. If you don’t learn efficiently from it, no sweat. (I am still a person browsing TextFugu until I make enough cash for one of the plans so this is especially important to me once I purchase the full textbook).

    and the one that is especially big to me….

    10. It keeps you interested in learning a language. Languages are very daunting and when you start studying you can feel the why-am-I-doing-this feeling. But not here, there is plenty of humor in the pictures and text throughout the website and when things get particularly tough and uninspiring, Koichi sympathizes and understands (it’s getting mushy, I know) that kanji, on’yomi, kun’yomi, e.t.c. is insanely hard and then explains the concepts even more so you are sure to get it. And that my friends, is why anyone going to Japan, or that loves Japan, or that is a Japanese, or is an aspiring weaboo, should become a member. And this my friends, is why I love TextFugu.

    btw- Koichi, if you’re reading this, you should consider making TextFugu an actual, physical textbook! I’m no marketer, but if you make a physical textbook the way you make your online ones, it would be a hit!

  • Ian

    Kotoba for the iOS has been a lifesaver for me.  I’m just finishing 2 months of stay in Japan (6 weeks of an intensive study abroad at Kanazawa Institute of Technology studying Japanese Communication, Culture, and Japanese for Science and Technology and 2 weeks of travel) and I’ve used this more times than I can count.  I did not bring a dictionary with me and no cell phone service meant no internet to look up words on my phone.  Kotoba downloads everything to your iOS device for use any time!  I can’t tell you how many times a conversation would have been over had I not been able to look up one crucial word in an instant!  Not to mention, the quick kanji lookup have helped reading signs!

  • Ariel

    I recommended Anki, Lang-8, and Denshi Jisho. 
    Anki is an amazing way to commit anything to your long-term memory with the spaced repetition system, especially the Japanese you love. It might be a little bit of work, but it’s all worth it- and it’s FREE! You know you love that!

    Lang-8 is great for testing your reading and writing ability, and seeing how native speakers would improve/correct your errors. There’s both free and premium versions, and I know I love free resources.

    I love Denshi Jisho. It lets you find any kanji you encounter, even if you don’t know what it is. You can  find a kanji by the number of strokes it has, meaning, or radicals. Quite useful; more so than a traditional paper dictionary.

  • wannabe

    I reccomend Textfugu becuase Koichi is awesome!

  • yakuzaishi

    Remembering the Kanji:

    If I could recommend only one resource on the resources page, this would
    be it.  I’m currently going through RTK now, and it’s working wonders
    for me.  The basic idea is to give you the same advantage a Chinese
    speaker has in that you’ll know a good deal of the writing system by the
    end.  It’s sort of a delayed gratification, but even if you only do 15
    characters a day, you’ll be done in 4 and a half months and be much
    better for it.  Be sure to check out  kanji.koohii.net for extra help!

    Tae Kim’s Grammar Guide:

    This is a terrific resource for learning a variety of Japanese grammar,
    and it always gives example sentences.  Great for adding sentences to
    your SRS, you’ll be a grammar king in no time with this!

    Genki:

    This was my first Japanese text book.  It helped me get to the
    intermediate level I started learning at back in February.  I used it in
    a classroom, and can only recommend it for use as such.  I can’t see it
    as a great self-teaching tool.

    Lang-8:

    Again, this is most useful for someone at least intermediate, such as
    myself.  You may find you have to look up tons of words and grammar
    constructs just to make a short blog post, but the feedback you get in
    invaluable.

    Rikaichan:

    Excellent for navigating Japanese pages when you’re winging it, and also
    for translating kanji lyrics.  It’s a bit of a crutch though, be sure
    to learn from it and not let it gives you a false sense of
    accomplishment.

    Anki:

    I know I said RTK is my most highly recommended tool, but this just goes
    hand in hand with RTK.  Use this in conjunction with RTK to learn all
    your kanji.  Not only is SRS great for Japanese, but for quickly
    learning school stuff so you can go back to learning more Japanese! :)

    Forvo:

    Japanese words aren’t that hard to figure out, but when in doubt use
    this.  Can also be used to settle disputes with friends about how to
    pronounce English words :P

    Ultimate Verbs/Nouns/Adjectives:

    Having never used these, I’m reluctant to actually recommend them.  But
    frequency lists are awesome, and can really give your vocab a boost. 
    I’d love to have any one of these myself, but I spent all my money on
    hookers and blow :(

    Kotaba:

    Best dictionary app I’ve found for iPhone, hands down.

    Anki Mobile:

    All the joy of Anki, in the palm of your hand.  Worth the price,
    especially if being used for school work as well.  Requires continued
    use of the computer one for most of your deck management and whatnot. 
    It’s also still a work in progress.

    Denshi Jisho:

    Much more than a dictionary, this can give you kanji information
    (including the corresponding number in a variety of dictionaries,
    including Remembering the Kanji) and example sentences for your SRSing
    pleasure.

  • Sozen

    I recommended two learning tools; Textfugu and Remembering the Kanji. I choose them because they supplement each other well. Kanji for me is ridiculously hard to to remember and i found that textfugu as great as a tool it is couldn’t help me remember kanji well so i looked for an outside source. I came to Remember the Kanji and it definitely; with the help of textfugu, helped me learn the basics quicker. As for everything else textfugu is the perfect tool and I am certain en a person who doesn’t learn well on there own wont have a hard time learning from it.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3TGHRSNRKLYS2CETET2GD32YZU Hope Schmidt

    I just paid $22.87 for an iPad2 (64GB) and my girlfriend loves her Panasonic Lumix GF 1 Camera that we got for $38.76 there arriving tomorrow by UPS. I will never pay such expensive retail prices in stores again. Especially when I also sold a 40 inch LED TV to my boss for $674 which only cost me $62.81 to buy. Here is the website we use to get it all from, CentHub.com

  • Kelly Lynch

    Have recommended TextFugu and TextFugu’s Hirigana/Katagana charts, due to their easy to use nature; Tae Kim’s Guide because it’s just so durned logical; and JapanesePod101 for their audio lessons — great for the car. 

    Some of the resources on your resource page I haven’t come across before, so I may just have to scope them out. :D  Now, to study for 5 minutes! (email kellydlynch at gmail.com)

  • Danielle S.

    I recommended Genki and Lang-8 out of the resources provided. My Japanese teacher used Genki and it’s something that I’m very familiar with. I’m almost at intermediate level but I’ve been noticing more and more how much I’ve forgotten, so I’ve decided to go through from the very beginning with Genki and I’m appreciating how easy it is to understand (and regretting that I took it for granted in high school). It’s actually kind of humorous because it follows a storyline somewhat and it’s got that one character that is always the butt of all the jokes, Takeshi. 

    Moving on, I really like Lang-8 because it really helped me when, in class, I was writing to a pen-friend in Japan. First, I would post what I thought I wanted to send online and in turn it would get corrected and I’d see where I messed up. It also puts into perspective that it’s okay to be a little bit off in translation because so are the people learning English. It made me not get so befuddled with myself when I messed up because the people who correct me are very nice about it. 

    There’s also another resource that I use sometimes that’s not listed and it’s http://erin.ne.jp/ . I really wish Koichi, Hachi or John would review this because it’s friendly for all levels of learners and it’s awesome in all areas of Japanese. It’s a bit goofy, too, which makes it easier to learn instead of being stressed out over monotonous learning (but that last bit wasn’t directed at any of the resources on the Resource Page).

  • Mitchell Atlas

    Tae Kim’s Grammar Guide: This is my go-to resource for looking up grammar points when I am unsure. Very clear, plain-english explanations for people who just want to get to the point.

    RTK: The granddaddy of kanji books. Though it may not feel like you are learning “real” Japanese at first, keep with it and it will surely pay off in the end!

    Lang-8: Excellent place to get your writing corrected. The community there is extremely helpful and enthusiastic to help you with your learning! Plus, you’re almost guaranteed to make a new friend or two.

    Anki: Hands-down the best free SRS software available. Snag some shared decks, sit down for 30 minutes a day, and study! Goes very well with RTK.

    Rikaichan (or rikaikun for Chrome https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/jipdnfibhldikgcjhfnomkfpcebammhp): Extremely convenient in-browser Japanese dictionary. Stuck on a word? Rikaichan will help you learn it ASAP!

    ReadTheKanji: Lets you practice your kanji readings without getting bored! Its strangely addicting gameplay will keep you studying for hours!

    RealKana: How I learned to read my kana. As an intermediate, I remember how hard it was to learn kana, until I found RealKana. It may not look fancy, but practice with it every day and you’ll be reading like it’s second nature to you! Seriously, you’ll have it down with less than a week of regular practice!

    Ankimobile (and also AnkiDroid for Android https://market.android.com/details?id=com.ichi2.anki&hl=en): Can’t get enough Anki? Practice on your smartphone or tablet wherever you go! I prefer AnkiDroid because it automatically reminds me to do my reviews!

    Denshi Jisho: My starting point for finding more about a new word I encounter. Use the external links to other websites (ALC, Goo Jisho, Japanese Wikipedia, Google Images, etc.) to help you build vocabulary cards in Anki!

    EDIT: my email: xatlasm [at] gmail [dot] com

  • Mitchell Atlas

    Tae Kim’s Grammar Guide: This is my go-to resource for looking up grammar points when I am unsure. Very clear, plain-english explanations for people who just want to get to the point.

    RTK: The granddaddy of kanji books. Though it may not feel like you are learning “real” Japanese at first, keep with it and it will surely pay off in the end!

    Lang-8: Excellent place to get your writing corrected. The community there is extremely helpful and enthusiastic to help you with your learning! Plus, you’re almost guaranteed to make a new friend or two.

    Anki: Hands-down the best free SRS software available. Snag some shared decks, sit down for 30 minutes a day, and study! Goes very well with RTK.

    Rikaichan (or rikaikun for Chrome https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/jipdnfibhldikgcjhfnomkfpcebammhp): Extremely convenient in-browser Japanese dictionary. Stuck on a word? Rikaichan will help you learn it ASAP!

    ReadTheKanji: Lets you practice your kanji readings without getting bored! Its strangely addicting gameplay will keep you studying for hours!

    RealKana: How I learned to read my kana. As an intermediate, I remember how hard it was to learn kana, until I found RealKana. It may not look fancy, but practice with it every day and you’ll be reading like it’s second nature to you! Seriously, you’ll have it down with less than a week of regular practice!

    Ankimobile (and also AnkiDroid for Android https://market.android.com/details?id=com.ichi2.anki&hl=en): Can’t get enough Anki? Practice on your smartphone or tablet wherever you go! I prefer AnkiDroid because it automatically reminds me to do my reviews!

    Denshi Jisho: My starting point for finding more about a new word I encounter. Use the external links to other websites (ALC, Goo Jisho, Japanese Wikipedia, Google Images, etc.) to help you build vocabulary cards in Anki!

    EDIT: my email: xatlasm [at] gmail [dot] com

  • Mitchell Atlas

    Tae Kim’s Grammar Guide: This is my go-to resource for looking up grammar points when I am unsure. Very clear, plain-english explanations for people who just want to get to the point.

    RTK: The granddaddy of kanji books. Though it may not feel like you are learning “real” Japanese at first, keep with it and it will surely pay off in the end!

    Lang-8: Excellent place to get your writing corrected. The community there is extremely helpful and enthusiastic to help you with your learning! Plus, you’re almost guaranteed to make a new friend or two.

    Anki: Hands-down the best free SRS software available. Snag some shared decks, sit down for 30 minutes a day, and study! Goes very well with RTK.

    Rikaichan (or rikaikun for Chrome https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/jipdnfibhldikgcjhfnomkfpcebammhp): Extremely convenient in-browser Japanese dictionary. Stuck on a word? Rikaichan will help you learn it ASAP!

    ReadTheKanji: Lets you practice your kanji readings without getting bored! Its strangely addicting gameplay will keep you studying for hours!

    RealKana: How I learned to read my kana. As an intermediate, I remember how hard it was to learn kana, until I found RealKana. It may not look fancy, but practice with it every day and you’ll be reading like it’s second nature to you! Seriously, you’ll have it down with less than a week of regular practice!

    Ankimobile (and also AnkiDroid for Android https://market.android.com/details?id=com.ichi2.anki&hl=en): Can’t get enough Anki? Practice on your smartphone or tablet wherever you go! I prefer AnkiDroid because it automatically reminds me to do my reviews!

    Denshi Jisho: My starting point for finding more about a new word I encounter. Use the external links to other websites (ALC, Goo Jisho, Japanese Wikipedia, Google Images, etc.) to help you build vocabulary cards in Anki!

    EDIT: my email: xatlasm [at] gmail [dot] com

  • James Crisman

    I recommended RikaiChan/Rikaikun (depending on the browser you use) because it’s really helpful telling you what the kanji is, what it’s base form is in kana, and gives English definition. I’ve used it hundreds of times decoding a pen-pals email. :)

    Anki is fantastic for someone who wants the 2000 kanji/kana/vocab/grammar flash cards, but is way too lazy to make each themselves (like me :D). Anki also has a great syncing system, so the progress statistics and customized flash cards you make will be synced across computers and phones. (they have Anki on android and ios I believe) 

    Japanese for Busy People is great as well. However, I’ve heard that versions earlier than the 3rd edition are not as well organized. It’s good for workbook style learning.

  • James Crisman

    I recommended RikaiChan/Rikaikun (depending on the browser you use) because it’s really helpful telling you what the kanji is, what it’s base form is in kana, and gives English definition. I’ve used it hundreds of times decoding a pen-pals email. :)

    Anki is fantastic for someone who wants the 2000 kanji/kana/vocab/grammar flash cards, but is way too lazy to make each themselves (like me :D). Anki also has a great syncing system, so the progress statistics and customized flash cards you make will be synced across computers and phones. (they have Anki on android and ios I believe) 

    Japanese for Busy People is great as well. However, I’ve heard that versions earlier than the 3rd edition are not as well organized. It’s good for workbook style learning.

  • James Crisman

    I recommended RikaiChan/Rikaikun (depending on the browser you use) because it’s really helpful telling you what the kanji is, what it’s base form is in kana, and gives English definition. I’ve used it hundreds of times decoding a pen-pals email. :)

    Anki is fantastic for someone who wants the 2000 kanji/kana/vocab/grammar flash cards, but is way too lazy to make each themselves (like me :D). Anki also has a great syncing system, so the progress statistics and customized flash cards you make will be synced across computers and phones. (they have Anki on android and ios I believe) 

    Japanese for Busy People is great as well. However, I’ve heard that versions earlier than the 3rd edition are not as well organized. It’s good for workbook style learning.

  • Akaimon3

    I recommend Anki for more immersion help and Textfugu, not only coz it is coooool but the author is somewhat of a stud in certain circles on the web…

  • Jonathan Roth

    I’ve just started checking out TextFugu, the best part is the human tone in the lesson structure.  It’s written for a student who wants to learn, without the feeling that the next line will be “help, I’m stuck in a textbook factory, nooooooo.”

    TextFugu spices up the process by recommending a healthy number of resources, which keeps you moving briskly through the course, and more importantly, keeps you motivated with a community.  Anki, RealKana, and the Kana charts have been excellent tools as I start learning Japanese, and I look forward to the lessons to come.  

  • Tompe99

    I like textfugu because it will prevent me from buying Japanese books and dictionary!….

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7S4DZLPTDTMWZBFJFA7AMNFC7E beksblzr

    First I recommended the Resources page, then I recommended TextFugu,
    TextFugu Hiragana and Katakana charts, JapanesePod101 and Lang 8.

    I
    recommended the Tofugu products because I am new to learning Japanese
    and these are good tools to start with.   And the fact that you can
    download them is great because I have the charts in my study notebook to
    refer to.  AND I like the Youtube videos you post and the great sense
    of humor that shows throughout the website. Like the picture at the top
    of the post. I will be stealing it for a profile pic!

    JapanesePod101
    is another nice website. They send you emails about different aspects
    of Japanese language and culture when you sign up for the free emails.

    Lang8
    is a great site as well because you get to connect with other people
    that want to learn your language and you want to learn theirs, it is a
    nice language exchange site and you meet really nice people. 

  • Alexa

    I recommended Genki I and ReadtheKanji.com.

    In high school, we used the Genki textbook. The thing I really like about it is its simple language and layout. The grammar section is easy enough that you can teach yourself, even if you don’t have a teacher. There’s no substitute for a real teacher, but I think this textbook can really take you far. I love the examples with every new grammar section new – it really sticks the concept in my head. Learn by doing, and all that.

    I just got back from a study trip in Japan, so I went looking on the resource page for something to help me with kanji, and ReadtheKanji was GREAT. I learned a lot of new kanji and vocabulary. It’s nice that it’s split into the JLPT levels also. The only complaint I have about it is the way the kanji with verbs are taught. I wish there would be an option to turn off the furigana on certain kanji, like when you have “to eat”, it’ll say 食べる, instead of just the kanji. I know that’s how it would be seen in real context, but it doesn’t help the urge to just memorize the general look of the kanji instead of learning its radicals and strokes.

  • Setobox

    I recommend RealKana and Rikaichan. RealKana is really useful when you are just starting out on learning Hiragana and Katakana and you need help memorizing. I know it helped me out in college when I just started taking Japanese.

    Rikaichan/kun is really helpful if you like looking at Japanese blogs or quotes and you don’t know what the kanji you are reading mean. It’s faster and easier  than breaking out your textbook. However, I do double check with my textbook to see if it is right.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7S4DZLPTDTMWZBFJFA7AMNFC7E beksblzr

    First I recommended the Resources page, then I recommended TextFugu,
    TextFugu Hiragana and Katakana charts, JapanesePod101 and Lang 8.
    I recommended the Tofugu products because I am new to learning Japanese
    and these are good tools to start with.   And the fact that you can
    download them is great because I have the charts in my study notebook to
    refer to.  AND I like the Youtube videos you post and the great sense
    of humor that shows throughout the website. Like the picture at the top
    of the post. I will be stealing it for a profile pic!
    JapanesePod101
    is another nice website. They send you emails about different aspects
    of Japanese language and culture when you sign up for the free emails.

    Lang8
    is a great site as well because you get to connect with other people
    that want to learn your language and you want to learn theirs, it is a
    nice language exchange site and you meet really nice people. 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7S4DZLPTDTMWZBFJFA7AMNFC7E beksblzr

    First I recommended the Resources page, then I recommended TextFugu,
    TextFugu Hiragana and Katakana charts, JapanesePod101 and Lang 8.
    I recommended the Tofugu products because I am new to learning Japanese
    and these are good tools to start with.   And the fact that you can
    download them is great because I have the charts in my study notebook to
    refer to.  AND I like the Youtube videos you post and the great sense
    of humor that shows throughout the website. Like the picture at the top
    of the post. I will be stealing it for a profile pic!
    JapanesePod101
    is another nice website. They send you emails about different aspects
    of Japanese language and culture when you sign up for the free emails.
    Lang8
    is a great site as well because you get to connect with other people
    that want to learn your language and you want to learn theirs, it is a
    nice language exchange site and you meet really nice people. 

  • shane

    First off I recommended Textfugu. It may be the obvious kiss-up choice, but that doesn’t stop it from being one lean, mean, 日本語-teaching machine! I haven’t been able to get a full subscription yet, but just running through the free pages in a couple of days has taught me more than any alternate-language class I’ve ever been in has taught me in weeks! And to follow that up I recommended Lang-8, because that is a ridiculously useful thing, and I’m kind of surprised that it hasn’t been around longer. Any language should be learned like this, I mean, isn’t this how learning other languages began? By learning from native speakers? I’m pretty sure that is one major YES! I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy to learn another language without resources like these. 

    P.S.  The learning resources page is linked 4 times in this article(7, if you count links that appear on every page.) Way to be a pimp, Koichi. 

  • http://www.jamaipanese.com Jamaipanese

    Tae Kim’s Guide to Learning Japanese!!! everything on one guide, no additional resources necessary!

  • Rafael

    I’m big on learning Kanji, or at least trying to so I recommended remembering the Kanji, rikaichan and Kotoba. Remembering the Kanji was awesome in helping me remember kanji, and I would really recommend it to anyone who really wants to tackle the world of Kanji.  Rikiachan is great because it took away my fear of surfing Japanese websites, since I can read those Kanji that I didn’t know. I have Kotoba as an app on my ipod and it is helpful looking up words that come up during conversation with some of my Japanese friends..(they think I’m just checking my email..hehehe) 
    (unofficialsamurai@yahoo.com) 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Juan-L-Gonzalez/559024465 Juan L. Gonzalez

    I recommended “Japanese the Manga Way” it’s a really nice book, plus my fiancee gave it to me as a gift to practice Japanese :)

  • http://twitter.com/tweetyburdz Future Dr. Arguelles

    Okay, I mainly recommend Genki, TaeKim’s Guide, and Rikaichan/kun.

    Genki is my main source and TaeKim’s guide is my supplement. Genki is a good one for beginners because it’s very easy to understand and even comes with audio so you can hear pronunciations. The speech is slowed down a bit though, but that’s what’s good for starters especially when you’re still poor with listening comprehension.

    TaeKim’s guide is also really good. If there is something you don’t understand in Genki, TaeKim is a great supplement. And it even teaches some casual speech and shortcuts earlier on (my favorite is ~なくちゃ and ~なきゃ ’cause they sound cute. Lol).

    As for Rikaichan/kun, it’s very useful if you’re browsing some Japanese website or reading some Japanese article and you can’t understand everything that’s on it. It saves you the time of copy-pasting a word to an online dictionary.

    I also recommended some of the cheatsheets just for supplements, especially the one for particles. The most confusing particle is が and it took me more than Genki and TaeKim to really understand it. >.<

    I WOULD recommend TextFugu, but I haven't subscribed to it yet. The free lessons were promising though. So maybe if I'm randomly picked for the FOREVER subscription in this contest, then I can really recommend TextFugu. XP

  • Tiffany F.

    I recommended Genki
    For reasons you will see.
    I’ll explain in verse, yes, verse,
    Why for Genki you should open your purse*.

    I’ll admit I am a textbook freak.
    I will admit, I will geek
    Over the sight, the smell, the feel
    Of a book in the world so real.

    But the real reason I love this book,
    Why I find it worth more than a precursory look
    Goes beyond its physical glamour**.
    Nay, my friends, me and Genki? True amor.

    I love the little skits they show***
    At the beginning of the chapter, oh!,
    As well as its companion works****
    As well as the little tiny quirks*****.

    This book has been a comfort to me
    Through Japanese 1, 2, but sadly not 3******.
    But I declare that nothing is worse
    Than not using Genki to, through Japanese, traverse.

    Notes:
    * Or wallet. But I needed the rhyme.
    ** I really do like the aesthetics of it. The fonts, layouts, drawings, etc., are cute.
    *** By skits I mean dialogues. They can be quite entertaining and helpful.
    **** I liked having the workbook and CDs to help reinforce the lessons. Oh gods I’m such a geek.
    ***** By quirks I’m mostly referring to the characters in the dialogues. There’s one guy in one dialogue (the details escape me) who is so desperately desperate to date a girl. His social awkwardness is endearing.
    ****** I took two years of Japanese classes. I was going to take a third but it didn’t work out.

  • tb0t

    There once was a man from Bree
    Who had not even heard of Anki.
        He got that and TextFugu
        (‘Cause he’s not a mugu)
    Now his Japanese is kakoii!
     
    I have never had more fun and been more effective learning a language than with TextFugu/Anki. That’s all!

  • Serena

    I recommended Forvo. I like it because you can hear individual words being pronounced by native speakers. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1633287570 Lazar Ljubenović

    I picked lang-8.

    Beginner, advanced or expert – you can get help with your Japanese from kind community on lang-8. But not only that! They also write about their customs, cultures, festivals, and other interesting things about Japan. You read their diaries, so you get to know more about real daily life in Japan. In exchange, you write about your own country and correct their English! It’s site where you can form friendship, and exchange language, culture and customs. :)

    (lazarljubenovic@gmail.com)

  • Jodi Slager

    My number one recommendation is TextFugu. I almost fell into the (dare I say) Rosetta Stone trance.  I tell everyone with ears about how awesome you guys are. Second recommendation, RealKana.  I have just started out and this tool has been immensely helpful.  I love TextFugu. I love Tofugu. I love all things Fugu. I don’t even know what I’m saying, but I love it. jodi.slager@gmail.com

  • Anonymous

    After looking over Tofugu.com for several months now and trying out each different resource recommended for people interested in learning Japanese, I have compiled a list that I think is GREAT for people wanting to learn.

    1. Tofugu
    Even though this isn’t a source recommended (TextFugu is), it is a great place to develop MORE of an interest in learning the Japanese language. I have introduced many of my friends to this website and everyone has enjoyed it.  Learning things such as the Mythical Ra-Ri-Ru-Re-Ro sound and how to place your tongue to the Yodi style grammar sentences in Japanese.  Many of these guides are put into TextFugu, so check them both out.  Speaking of TextFugu….

    2. TextFugu
    I have taken a college class of Japanese and I can say that TextFugu does an EXCELLENT job on teaching it.  I have read 12 chapters on TextFugu in one month and learned the same amount of material in 4 months of taking a Japanese class. That is how down-to-earth learning is on TextFugu!  Everything is simplified ESPECIALLY Kanji learning (You know, the one everyone fears!).  Not even Japanese friends of mine thought of looking at Kanji the same way when I talked about Kanji merely being puzzle pieces and not stroke orders.  You can’t not go wrong too with $20 a month or $110 Forever subscription.  I payed probably x3 times as much for the Japanese class, and TextFugu offers more than what it covered.  It is constantly being updated and being modified to fix mistakes.  Textbooks can’t do that; Check out TextFugu!

    3.  Anki
    Anki is a program that uses flashcard type methods to teach you vocabulary, the japanese “alphabets,” and etc.  I use this program currently to re-study the Hiragana (keep it fresh in my mind), and new nouns.  It is a well developed program that calculates how well you are learning.  Basically, you open a deck of flashcards (you can download those decks from TextFugu), and force yourself to remember what it is (like a flashcard), and answer truthfully and how difficult it was to remember.  If it was hard, you hit soon; it will review that card until it sticks like a parasite.  It will tell you how often you need to review the decks in order for this to become a permanent learning process.  Great program!

    4. Kotoba!
    Kotoba! is an iPhone/iPod/iPad app that basically lets you look up ANY word you want (mostly).  The program accepts English as well as Romanji.  The vocabulary goes into GREAT detail on each word and links to similar words.  It will tell you the Kanji for it, the Radicals that are made up for the Kanji, and even how to write it!  Great program, many of my friends have it and I recommend it.

    5. Rikaichan
    This program doesn’t necessarily teach you Japanese, but it is great for when you encounter words or letters in Japanese typeset font on a page and not exactly sure what it means.  It is a plugin for Firefox that when enabled, you can mouseover Japanese text and the program tells you the definition of it and similarities to what it might mean (both in Hiragana and Kanji).  Excellent tool not to learn (don’t be lazy, learn Japanese!), but to find definitions on the go.

    6. Evernote
    Evernote is a program that can be used to blog your progress and be used to keep notes on anything.  I use it to tell myself how much I have learned, what I have gone over, and to keep myself update on where I am when it comes to learning.  Also, it is funny to see what I wrote about in the past when I am learning Japanese. This isn’t a program on the recommended list, but I think it should be. :)

    There are tons of great resources out there if you know where to find them, and this is a great site to navigate you there. Koichi also posted this article awhile back, and I am linking to show more great resources.  http://www.tofugu.com/2010/04/06/tofugu-100-best-japanese-learning-resources/
    Things such as Slime Forest (RPG game to help you learn Kanji) for example are other great resources out there.

    (Email: jordanmcq78@gmail.com)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=579595928 Alyshia Olsen

    PS: #correction
    otherwise we won’t be able t0* get ahold of you :(

    Hmm… When I first read about this in the newsletter, I thought the idea was to recommend things not on the page. So I’ll throw out a few cool sites anyway, to not waste my ponderings.123Japanese.com  Simple, straightforward lessons. I find it a nice supplement to, say, Tae Kim’s grammar guide, if I need a different perspective.Kana Invaders (http://learnjapanesepod.com/kana-invaders/)  I had already memorized the kana before finding this, but I wish I’d known about it sooner. It’s effective, fun, and the dinosaur is at least as cute as Fugu.

    LiveMocha. See #3

    ~woop~

    1) Textfugu. It’s very ‘consciously’ written. When reading other guides it sometimes feels as if the writer doesn’t remember what it was like to learn a second language, and doesn’t acknowledge the challenges at all. Textfugu has a bit of everything, with just enough silly humour – while staying on topic – to keep it enjoyable and refreshing. I’m also a fan of the clean, simplistic layout. Plus, the support is very personal.

    2) Tae Kim’s guide. I wouldn’t recommend it alone, but I also wouldn’t recommend going without it. It’s extensive and detailed, complete with well paced practices. It doesn’t have quite as familiar a tone as Textfugu – one of my favorite parts, and why it is #1 – but I wouldn’t call it dry.

    3) Lang8. I don’t actually use Lang8. I did, for about a day, but now I use LiveMocha. My only issue with Lang8 is, as a beginner, the extent of my journal entries would be ‘I have a cat. My cat is cute. She is not a dog.’ LiveMocha lets you practice your Japanese with ‘lessons’ and ‘exercises’, which are corrected by native speakers. You, in turn, can correct other people’s lessons in your native tongue… just like Lang8. I don’t particularly care for the lesson structure; it’s more about pure memorization of phrases than teaching the building blocks. I would suggest starting here, though, if you find you love the idea of Lang8 but aren’t ready to write without prompts. I’ll hopefully switch back in a month or two…

    There’s more, but, I should be studying! *flitters off*

  • K+H=Awesome

    I reccomend Textfugu all the way. I get discouraged in studying japanese at a young age (16)because I don’t have anyone else around me who is studying or knows anything about Japan. After discovering Textfugu, Japanese has become a much more atainable and enjoyable language to learn. I also think NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheat is very useful to go along with Textfugu when it comes to self-learners. They both display the language in an easy to understand, helpful, and useful way. 

    (Email: turtlelf33@mail.com)

  • micky2be

    My recommendations:- Genki:Very easy to start with this book.A bit difficult to use it for self-teaching- Remembering the Kanji:A great help to learn kanji, from the start to advanced level.- Rikaichan:Perfect to navigate through Japanese pages- Denshi Jisho:Best online dictionary, with all kanji information you may need.(Danger with linux, can display chinese charaters)- Kotaba:Great dictionary, and it’s French!

  • Szilárd Csermely

    I’m using a lot of resources for my epic journey in the Japanese language, and to the Japanese-deparment of a university. I’m learning the language in a language-school, so I’m not using any kind of textbooks, we only get sheets copied from Minna no Nihongo or Genki!. I’ve picked a few which I can recommend to anyone who is learning the language.

    Textfugu – If you’re a beginner, I highly recommend this one! I’ve payed for a one month membership when Koichi decided he will donate it to a charity for the Touhoku victims. Sadly (or not), that time I had already reached a point where I couldn’t learn new grammar from the site. The site is extremely user-friendly, the grammar points are easily understandable, – even for me :) – and one of the best things that I find in the site is, that if you don’t understand something you can ask it on the forums (awesome community), or simply ask Koichi himself, who has replied most of my tweets or mails.

    Anki – That’s a pretty good flashcard app, I’ve recommended it to my classmates in the school. When we learn new words, I instantly add them from my phone or on PC. I’m also revise my How to Remember Kanji cards. To be honest, the best thing is that you can grab the Android app for free or the iOS version cheaply from the store, so you can learn while you’re on the go!

    Tae Kim – As I’ve already mentioned we don’t use any textbooks in the language school, and sometimes I feel like I need a book. The example sentences are great, and it uses kanji for it – the author said you’d better get used to them or you’ll be lost in Japan.

    Remembering the Kanji – My sensei recommened it for me (he knew I was a sucker for kanji), and his friend translated it to Hungarian, so I thought I’d give it a try. I’m using it with the Anki deck, and if I don’t understand something or can’t remember it I look it up on http://kanji.koohii.com/, there are always nice comments from other people.

    Jisho.org – it’s The Dictionary, ‘nuf said. I like the kanji by radicals for quick kanji look up.

    Rikaichan for Chrome/Firefox – When I’m lazy to look up something on Jisho.org I use this.

    Not in the list, but i recommend it too:

    – Japanese English Dictionary – (Android) Based on Jim Breen’s Edict, this dictionary is awesome. You can save the words you want, even take notes (though i use Evernote for that) and you can export the previously saved words to an Anki file or to your Google Docs. How awesome is that?!

    – iKnow.jp – The former Smart.fm, it’s almost the same as Anki, but has prettier interface. There’s Android/iPhone app too.

  • Szilárd Csermely

    I’m using a lot of resources for my epic journey in the Japanese language, and to the Japanese-deparment of a university. I’m learning the language in a language-school, so I’m not using any kind of textbooks, we only get sheets copied from Minna no Nihongo or Genki!. I’ve picked a few which I can recommend to anyone who is learning the language.

    Textfugu – If you’re a beginner, I highly recommend this one! I’ve payed for a one month membership when Koichi decided he will donate it to a charity for the Touhoku victims. Sadly (or not), that time I had already reached a point where I couldn’t learn new grammar from the site. The site is extremely user-friendly, the grammar points are easily understandable, – even for me :) – and one of the best things that I find in the site is, that if you don’t understand something you can ask it on the forums (awesome community), or simply ask Koichi himself, who has replied most of my tweets or mails.

    Anki – That’s a pretty good flashcard app, I’ve recommended it to my classmates in the school. When we learn new words, I instantly add them from my phone or on PC. I’m also revise my How to Remember Kanji cards. To be honest, the best thing is that you can grab the Android app for free or the iOS version cheaply from the store, so you can learn while you’re on the go!

    Tae Kim – As I’ve already mentioned we don’t use any textbooks in the language school, and sometimes I feel like I need a book. The example sentences are great, and it uses kanji for it – the author said you’d better get used to them or you’ll be lost in Japan.

    Remembering the Kanji – My sensei recommened it for me (he knew I was a sucker for kanji), and his friend translated it to Hungarian, so I thought I’d give it a try. I’m using it with the Anki deck, and if I don’t understand something or can’t remember it I look it up on http://kanji.koohii.com/, there are always nice comments from other people.

    Jisho.org – it’s The Dictionary, ‘nuf said. I like the kanji by radicals for quick kanji look up.

    Rikaichan for Chrome/Firefox – When I’m lazy to look up something on Jisho.org I use this.

    Not in the list, but i recommend it too:

    – Japanese English Dictionary – (Android) Based on Jim Breen’s Edict, this dictionary is awesome. You can save the words you want, even take notes (though i use Evernote for that) and you can export the previously saved words to an Anki file or to your Google Docs. How awesome is that?!

    – iKnow.jp – The former Smart.fm, it’s almost the same as Anki, but has prettier interface. There’s Android/iPhone app too.

  • micky2be

    My recommendations:- Genki:Very easy to start with this book.A bit difficult to use it for self-teaching- Remembering the Kanji:A great help to learn kanji, from the start to advanced level.- Rikaichan:Perfect to navigate through Japanese pages- Denshi Jisho:Best online dictionary, with all kanji information you may need.(Danger with linux, can display chinese charaters)- Kotaba:Great dictionary, and it’s French!

  • K+H=Awesome

    I reccomend Textfugu all the way. I get discouraged in studying japanese at a young age (16)because I don’t have anyone else around me who is studying or knows anything about Japan. After discovering Textfugu, Japanese has become a much more atainable and enjoyable language to learn. I also think NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheat is very useful to go along with Textfugu when it comes to self-learners. They both display the language in an easy to understand, helpful, and useful way. 

    (Email: turtlelf33@mail.com)

  • Spritz05

    I recommended Japanese the Manga Way because it is great for ADD-riddled individuals such as myself! do you have a difficult time learning from non-entertaining media and text devoid of distracting side conversations? Now make your hobbies work for you! –
    spritz05@gmail.com

  • Spritz05

    I recommended Japanese the Manga Way because it is great for ADD-riddled individuals such as myself! do you have a difficult time learning from non-entertaining media and text devoid of distracting side conversations? Now make your hobbies work for you! –
    spritz05@gmail.com

  • http://shoujikishindoi.blogspot.com/ Rene

    I recommended  Gakuu because their lessons are  for intermediate learners which is what I need. Also, they uses some really good examples that you’ll never come across in text books or other sites. It feels like they’re emphasizing on Japanese that can be applied in your daily life.

    As for revision, I recommend Textfugu. Sometimes I tend to forget the basics and I’ll always check Textfugu for it.

    (email: iamrene627@gmail.com)

  • http://shoujikishindoi.blogspot.com/ Rene

    I recommended  Gakuu because their lessons are  for intermediate learners which is what I need. Also, they uses some really good examples that you’ll never come across in text books or other sites. It feels like they’re emphasizing on Japanese that can be applied in your daily life.

    As for revision, I recommend Textfugu. Sometimes I tend to forget the basics and I’ll always check Textfugu for it.

    (email: iamrene627@gmail.com)

  • Cosmo

    I recommend Remembering the Kanji because I am really actually able to remember them when I see them even though I am just at about 350, Anki is great for helping with the remembering. I use anki mobile when I am out with my android phone.

  • Cosmo

    I recommend Remembering the Kanji because I am really actually able to remember them when I see them even though I am just at about 350, Anki is great for helping with the remembering. I use anki mobile when I am out with my android phone.

  • http://twitter.com/miya235 miya

    all of that’s been shared in tofugu’s resource page are helpful for me particularly the web apps and cheatsheets. 

    but the most awesome tools that i would recommend would be:
    TextFugu, cuz it’s an online textbook, i would, since i like to make my study and revisions by topics. it’s easy to understand :)
    and the legendary Denshi Jisho! it has user-friendly layout (on browsers).

    btw, i want to share some very useful android apps that i use to make reference and kanji drills:JA Sensei http://goo.gl/lyysr (jouyou kanji by grade)Japanese-English Dict http://www.umibouzu.com/jed/ (offline jisho, shows almost all form of verbs)
    if possible could you put it up on the resource page?

  • http://twitter.com/miya235 miya

    all of that’s been shared in tofugu’s resource page are helpful for me particularly the web apps and cheatsheets. 

    but the most awesome tools that i would recommend would be:
    TextFugu, cuz it’s an online textbook, i would, since i like to make my study and revisions by topics. it’s easy to understand :)
    and the legendary Denshi Jisho! it has user-friendly layout (on browsers).

    btw, i want to share some very useful android apps that i use to make reference and kanji drills:JA Sensei http://goo.gl/lyysr (jouyou kanji by grade)Japanese-English Dict http://www.umibouzu.com/jed/ (offline jisho, shows almost all form of verbs)
    if possible could you put it up on the resource page?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_4LB36ATQOCZM362PM3JPNDV44Y Kayla

    I would recommend TextFugu because it explains in a way that’s easy to understand, and it’s interesting. Most textbooks tend to be dry and boring, so TextFugu is a nice change. The hiragana and katakana charts are also quick and easy reference tools. I would also recommend Tofugu’s particles cheatsheet because it makes particles a little less frustrating. When you have as much trouble with particles as I do, you need all the help you can get.

  • Anonymous

    I recommended three things.  
    TextFugu; I started learning Japanese on my own about a year and a half ago, I had a really tough time at first, not knowing really where to start and how. I had a hard time.. JFD(ing)I really, and the stuff I tried truly turned me in to a zombie. But TextFugu is easy to understand, keeps me entertained and makes me laugh more that sigh, and it’s the best leaning resource ever, If all languages had an online textbook like TextFugu, I would be learning a lot more languages, that’s for sure!  Anki; If used the right way pure awesome. I’m -way- to lazy to make my own flash cards from paper, plus it takes too long, I would lose time, they would get wrinkly etc.! With Anki I can download (steal!!) great decks others have made or I can make my own, I do both. The thing I love most with Anki is that I don’t have to keep track on what I should review, It does it for me! I use Anki everyday, its an addiction. 
    Denshi Jisho; I personally don’t own Japanese dictionary, so this is -really- helpful! The “kanji by radicals”-tab is the one I use the most. While reading  something, and coming over a kanji I totally have no clue about or I’m unsure about, I look it up there. It is so easy and there is no fuss. 

    This is my first time commenting here. I’m more of an onlooker. But I felt I had to say how much I like TextFugu and how much I appreciate your work. Thank you! (nielsen.elisabet@gmail.com)

  • Blair

    I recommended Textfugu. I haven’t been able to use it personally,  but I do believe in it. I really like Koichi’s approach on teaching and how to keep you motivated when you get discouraged. On top of all that, you learn just great study habits in general.

  • http://derickprize.wordpress.com/ Prize

    A shark’s recommendations for a beginner at Japanese:

    Textfugu, Remembering The Kanji, Anki.

    These three are all you need to get up and running if you’re a beginner at Japanese!

    TEXTFUGU – I’ve tried the free version of Textfugu and it’s simply amazing. I can’t imagine how astonishing the paid version will be. Textfugu brings you that good ol’ Tofugu humor but with a twist. That twist is that they’re teaching you Japanese in a very fun way. That’s right, you get the awesomeness of Tofugu AND you’re learning Japanese FAST. Also, here’s a tip for you explorers out there. If you explore deep enough into the depths of Textfugu, you might find a nice little discount for the full version. Take it from a shark! ;-)

    REMEMBERING THE KANJI – RTK is a fantastic book that gently introduces you to kanji by starting you off with primtiives and slowly working you towards the more advanced kanji. RTK will only teach you the meanings and NOT the readings of the kanji. That’s okay though because, in my opinion, getting the meaning of a kanji is the hardest part. Both RTK and Textfugu work exceptionally well with my last recommendation:

    ANKI – It’s free, nuff’ said. Actually no, that’s not enough to be said about Anki because it’s so awesome. Anki isn’t specifically related to Japanese but it works so well for learning languages. It uses Spaced Repetition to make you repeat something just before you forget it. (That’s the way of the future, bro!)

  • Anonymous

    I will studying abroad in Japan within the month and have been preparing for JLPT1. I am 20 now but passed JLPT2 when I was 17 (I was also hungover.) I have tried and used many of the resources listed above. Everybody learns differently and I’m only stating things that have been helpful (or not) personally. Hopefully this will help some people out.

    Anki – I’ve tried to use Anki on several occasions but never could get into it. I can see the appeal of using pre-made decks I was never a big fan of the GUI and large decks and their options often took long to load. Nevertheless there are a lot of options and information that can help you study.

    I’m only harsh on Anki because of the magic that is:
    READTHEKANJI.COM

    This site has ACTUALLY boosted my kanji and vocabulary skills greatly, it has JLPT4-1 readily available, and makes you type in the word which Anki doesn’t have (if I’m not mistaken.) This makes you really need to know the word and not click ‘Answer’ on Anki, get it wrong and cheat yourself saying ‘Oh yeah ok I knew that one.’ It keeps track of your right and wrong answers automatically, as well automatically adjusting their re-occurrence. It also has a pleasing interface and loads fast. I have encountered words in Japanese classes and on tests that I can recall learning from RTK.

    Moving on.

    Rikaichan/kun – This is a godly plugin that will show the reading and meaning for any kanji the mouse hovers over. Pressing enter will show the individual kanji, it’s readings, radicals, and some more useful information. It is a necessity for all Japanese learners and even those who are not learning but want to browse Japanese websites. An intermediate-advanced user can breeze through a newspaper article with just this plugin. It is truly fantastic and the repetition of words on websites will allow them to enter you to the point where you will not need to mouse over them. HOWEVER the one caveat, which I like to call ‘Heisig Syndrome’ may occur. This is when you see a kanji compound and understand it’s English meaning, but do not remember how to read it. This happens by only looking at the English meaning in the pop-up, or not looking at the Japanese reading long enough. Be careful.

    It goes without saying that I absolutely cannot recommend Heisig’s RTK for the exact reason above. You will learn how to remember meanings of Kanji, however they will not work for every or even many compounds and you will have NO IDEA how to actually read it.

    Moving on.

    alc.co.jp – This is the best Japanese English dictionary on the web. After using this site I’ve only been to jisho.org to look up a kanji with radicals when I was away from my computer. This site allows you to type in phrases from REAL ENGLISH and it will have multiple examples in Japanese. There is no better way to learn conversational Japanese than by looking up examples on this site with the help of rikaichan.

    Not on the list?
    Japanese friends – by way of
    mixi.jp and Skype.

    And rote memorization. Copying (correctly) characters and understanding their meanings and several compounds is still the best way to remember anything. Making the flashcards yourself actively involves you in the process and also helps.

    You can basically dominate Japanese with Readthekanji, Rikaichan, Alc dictionary + as well as basic rote memorization and social skills.

  • Anonymous

    I will studying abroad in Japan within the month and have been preparing for JLPT1. I am 20 now but passed JLPT2 when I was 17 (I was also hungover.) I have tried and used many of the resources listed above. Everybody learns differently and I’m only stating things that have been helpful (or not) personally. Hopefully this will help some people out.

    Anki – I’ve tried to use Anki on several occasions but never could get into it. I can see the appeal of using pre-made decks I was never a big fan of the GUI and large decks and their options often took long to load. Nevertheless there are a lot of options and information that can help you study.

    I’m only harsh on Anki because of the magic that is:
    READTHEKANJI.COM

    This site has ACTUALLY boosted my kanji and vocabulary skills greatly, it has JLPT4-1 readily available, and makes you type in the word which Anki doesn’t have (if I’m not mistaken.) This makes you really need to know the word and not click ‘Answer’ on Anki, get it wrong and cheat yourself saying ‘Oh yeah ok I knew that one.’ It keeps track of your right and wrong answers automatically, as well automatically adjusting their re-occurrence. It also has a pleasing interface and loads fast. I have encountered words in Japanese classes and on tests that I can recall learning from RTK.

    Moving on.

    Rikaichan/kun – This is a godly plugin that will show the reading and meaning for any kanji the mouse hovers over. Pressing enter will show the individual kanji, it’s readings, radicals, and some more useful information. It is a necessity for all Japanese learners and even those who are not learning but want to browse Japanese websites. An intermediate-advanced user can breeze through a newspaper article with just this plugin. It is truly fantastic and the repetition of words on websites will allow them to enter you to the point where you will not need to mouse over them. HOWEVER the one caveat, which I like to call ‘Heisig Syndrome’ may occur. This is when you see a kanji compound and understand it’s English meaning, but do not remember how to read it. This happens by only looking at the English meaning in the pop-up, or not looking at the Japanese reading long enough. Be careful.

    It goes without saying that I absolutely cannot recommend Heisig’s RTK for the exact reason above. You will learn how to remember meanings of Kanji, however they will not work for every or even many compounds and you will have NO IDEA how to actually read it.

    Moving on.

    alc.co.jp – This is the best Japanese English dictionary on the web. After using this site I’ve only been to jisho.org to look up a kanji with radicals when I was away from my computer. This site allows you to type in phrases from REAL ENGLISH and it will have multiple examples in Japanese. There is no better way to learn conversational Japanese than by looking up examples on this site with the help of rikaichan.

    Not on the list?
    Japanese friends – by way of
    mixi.jp and Skype.

    And rote memorization. Copying (correctly) characters and understanding their meanings and several compounds is still the best way to remember anything. Making the flashcards yourself actively involves you in the process and also helps.

    You can basically dominate Japanese with Readthekanji, Rikaichan, Alc dictionary + as well as basic rote memorization and social skills.

  • Pingback: My recommended Japanese learning resources « Silgrond's Blog()

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=46600700 Janelle Taylor

    I recommended the following resources:

     Lang-8: I think one of the most important things in learning a language is practicing the language.  What is better than being able to practice with native speakers of a language? Lang-8  offers it’s users, in most cases, immediate feedback by native speakers on what they’ve written. I’ve learned so many things from this site that I wouldn’t have found in a textbook.

    Rikaichan: I use this website extension/plug-in daily. My main use for this extension is to read Japanese song lyrics on sites like Evesta Lyrics and Goo. I also use it randomly when reading Japanese tweets and the description box on You Tube.

    Read The Kanji: I have a lifetime subscription to this site because I used it when it was still in beta testing. Therefore, I was grandfathered in when the site went “pay-only”.  I love seeing my progress on kanji and words in color/graph form. It’s so motivating. Plus, the quiz format is addicting.

    ALC (Space ALC): This is my new favorite dictionary. I even love it more than Jim Breen’s Online Japanese Dictionary. I like how it shows more accurate expressions and words are easier to find. Plus, they give a ton more example sentences than other dictionaries out there.

    Email (forgottenmems@gmail.com)

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jennifer-Collins/1375831833 Jennifer Collins

    http://jisho.org/
    I would highly recommend Denshi Jisho as anyone’s main online dictionary reference.  I’ve been using it since I started learning Japanese 5 years ago and its never failed me yet!   My favourite aspect is the finding Kanji by radicals option.  I love getting books in Japanese from the library and Denshi Jisho is the perfect resource for finding that one Kanji I can’t place (okay, there’s usually WAY more than one ;)).   You can look up words English->Japanese or Japanese->English.  You can turn on/off romaji and much much more!  But wait!  (Yes, there’s more).  Once you find the word your looking for you can click on Kanji details and this handy resource will even show you the stroke order of the Kanji!  This should be a top bookmark for anyone who wants to learn Japanese!  Ganbatte yo!
    Email: jcmusicaria@gmail.com

  • Leah

    I recommended:

    Anki – the fantastic flashcard program! When I first started studying Japanese, my sensei insisted that the entire class start using Anki; he even made us new decks for every lesson and had us send them to him each week so he could see where we were. Using it has become a daily habit now, and I find it way more effective than normal flashcards. Plus, it’s awesome to see how many cards you can study within a short span of time!

    Tae Kim’s Guide – this is such a great site. If ever there’s some grammar point I’m having trouble with, I go here to get a better explanation. I love how it uses lots of different examples, and explains everything very clearly.

    Denshi Jisho – my favorite dictionary site. It has a HUGE database of words and phrases, you can search kanji by radical, pages with meanings and stroke order for every kanji, it can search using romaji (for when I’m too lazy to bring up the IME), tells you if a word is a する verb or what kind of adjective…so much information! Extremely helpful, it’s nearly rendered my paper dictionary obsolete. =(

  • Leah

    I recommended:

    Anki – the fantastic flashcard program! When I first started studying Japanese, my sensei insisted that the entire class start using Anki; he even made us new decks for every lesson and had us send them to him each week so he could see where we were. Using it has become a daily habit now, and I find it way more effective than normal flashcards. Plus, it’s awesome to see how many cards you can study within a short span of time!

    Tae Kim’s Guide – this is such a great site. If ever there’s some grammar point I’m having trouble with, I go here to get a better explanation. I love how it uses lots of different examples, and explains everything very clearly.

    Denshi Jisho – my favorite dictionary site. It has a HUGE database of words and phrases, you can search kanji by radical, pages with meanings and stroke order for every kanji, it can search using romaji (for when I’m too lazy to bring up the IME), tells you if a word is a する verb or what kind of adjective…so much information! Extremely helpful, it’s nearly rendered my paper dictionary obsolete. =(

  • Tenshi

    Your Japanese resource page is nice, but kind of light on resources for more advanced learners. I’d recommend adding Daijirin and Daijisen under iOS apps, as a good kokugo dictionary will serve advanced learners better than Kotoba! (as much as I love it, Jim Breen’s dictionary, which Kotoba! uses, is a little spotty in some areas). Also, iBunko (HD) is a great ebook reader specifically designed for reading Japanese ebooks, while Wakaru is an ebook reader with Jim Breen’s dictionary built in, so you just have to select words to get a pop-up definition in english. Both of them can handle ebooks from Aozora bunko, which should definitely be in the list – free Japanese ebooks, including lots of great classic novels from authors like Natsume Souseki. It’s a must for people ready to go beyond a manga reading level.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1306004203 Bob Dobrow

    I recommended Genki 1 because I used it in my Japanese 101 class and loved it. It is an excellent textbook. I also recommended the Denshi Jisho dictionary which I use all the time, and am amazed how easy it is and how often it gives me the answer I am looking for.
    Doumo arigato gozaimsu.

  • アダム ザマン

    Japanese For Busy people is a great textbook but I found that I do most of my learning on the go therefore all of the cheat sheets and Anki mobile are really useful, especially for the lazy people who can’t be bothered to make their own decks of cards to revise with (You know who you are!) But from what I’ve seen and the trial lessons I’d love a subscription *hint* to Textfugu.

  • Parker

    1) Tae Kim:
    Because it’s way cheaper than buying any textbook, and it’s just as comprehensive as one.
    2) Remembering the Kanji:
    This one has helped me so much with ACTUALLY remembering the kanji, and did you know they have an iOS app too?
    3) Kotoba:
    I cant tell you how many times this has saved my ass during a conversation.
    4) Rikaichan:Also an ass saver, this one has helped me so much with price comparing  Japanese products, reading  Japanese articles, and other online resources.
    5) Anki:
    This helped me study every grade one kanji, and on top of that you can use it to study other languages too, so it’s got that to add to the list. As well I also like making my own flash card sets, kinda helps when you cant find anything.
    6) Textfugu Katakana Chart:
    It’s taped to my door, what else can I say?!?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1062810014 Alexander Michaelson

    Recommended Denshi Jisho, ALC, Rikaichan (also Rikaikun for Chrome), and Kotoba. I use all of these services almost every day, and they are all indispensable for various reasons.
    Denshi Jisho is great for quick lookup, and it shows good kanji information. ALC, on the other hand, is perfect for idiomatic phrases, for seeing how things REALLY are in Japanese. Rikaikun (Rikaichan) is absolutely essential for navigating the Japanese internet, and it works in Gmail too. Kotoba (also Japanese for the iPhone) is a must-have for everyday lookup, because of course you have it with you all the time.

  • Alex

    Recommended Denshi Jisho, ALC, Rikaichan (also Rikaikun for Chrome), and Kotoba. I use all of these services almost every day, and they are all indispensable for various reasons.Denshi Jisho is great for quick lookup, and it shows good kanji information. ALC, on the other hand, is perfect for idiomatic phrases, for seeing how things REALLY are in Japanese. Rikaikun (Rikaichan) is absolutely essential for navigating the Japanese internet, and it works in Gmail too. Kotoba (also Japanese for the iPhone) is a must-have for everyday lookup, because of course you have it with you all the time.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1062810014 Alexander Michaelson

    Recommended Denshi Jisho, ALC, Rikaichan (also Rikaikun for Chrome), and Kotoba. I use all of these services almost every day, and they are all indispensable for various reasons.Denshi Jisho is great for quick lookup, and it shows good kanji information. ALC, on the other hand, is perfect for idiomatic phrases, for seeing how things REALLY are in Japanese. Rikaikun (Rikaichan) is absolutely essential for navigating the Japanese internet, and it works in Gmail too. Kotoba (also Japanese for the iPhone) is a must-have for everyday lookup, because of course you have it with you all the time.

  • Sandra03

    Anki is great. I’m just starting to use it but so far I can already see how useful it is and will be. I downloaded a couple of decks and am making some of my own based off of things I am learning through the various torture sessions/lessons I put myself through.

    I of course recommended TextFugu because it’s awesome.  I’m poor and therefore have only gone through the free chapters but they are brilliant. The way the stuff is explained and organized makes more sense to me than anything else I’ve used, and it’s written in a way that is less boring than most tools also. Good job guys!

    I also recommended Tae Kim’s guide. Just starting on it as well but  it’s really useful. At first I was intimidated by all the kanji it uses but if you mouse over a kanji it shows you hiragana and english in a little popup so that’s really useful!! I can learn a little bit of kanji while learning about conjugation etc.

    Also recommended Tofugu’s particles cheatsheet. how handy is this??? Particles are less scary now.

    ooh and I can’t forget Read the Kanji. Very helpful not just for Kanji but for Hiragana also. I like this better than any other kana flashcard type tool I’ve tried.

    I’d like to say I’m intermediate/advanced but not quite yet I don’t think. I’m not sure, what qualifies someone as intermediate? I must be close by now anyway =P I’ve got my hiragana down, working on katakana and a bit of kanji, getting into more difficult conjugation but still have a pretty basic vocab. getting there though :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1062810014 Alexander Michaelson

    Recommended Denshi Jisho, ALC, Rikaichan (also Rikaikun for Chrome), and Kotoba. I use all of these services almost every day, and they are all indispensable for various reasons.Denshi Jisho is great for quick lookup, and it shows good kanji information. ALC, on the other hand, is perfect for idiomatic phrases, for seeing how things REALLY are in Japanese. Rikaikun (Rikaichan) is absolutely essential for navigating the Japanese internet, and it works in Gmail too. Kotoba (also Japanese for the iPhone) is a must-have for everyday lookup, because of course you have it with you all the time.

  • Todd Hancock

    My recommendations:

     Tae Kim’s guide to learning Japanese  – It’s great for learning grammar in a logical and structured way.  That’s pretty much the way I think, so it’s perfect for me.

    Remembering the Kanji I – Another logical learning method, this time for the Kanji. Makes much more sense than learning them the “Japanese Schoolkid” way.

    Anki – I use Anki every morning to review what I’ve learned from Tae Kim and RTK. I also use AnkiDroid on my Android device on days when I’m not at my computer in the morning.

    Rikaichan – Great for when I’m reading a site on the web and come across words that I don’t know.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Lawnmower16 Daniel Fawson

    My recommendations———-Tae Kim’s Grammar GuideIt may be a little too “down and dirty” for some, but if you’re somebody like me, it’s perfect. It cuts out all of the fluff, gives you almost all of the grammar you’ll ever need, and best of all, it’s FREE! There’s even an app (also free) for iOS that I’ve used more than anything should ever be used on the toilet. Use it if you want to launch yourself into nearly complete understanding of Japanese grammar as quickly as possible as cheaply as possible.AnkiThis is the best way to do flash cards. It spaces them out for you, shuffles them for you, and knows which ones you need to review and which ones can be pushed back for way later. I don’t just use it for Japanese, either. You can download from thousands of free amazing decks made by the community, or you can make your own. The app is free on everything except iOS, where it is very expensive. I still haven’t been able to bring myself to justify its 25 dollar price tag, but if you’ve got an Android device, you’re good to go.Rikaikun/RikaichanThe Chrome version I use is called Rikaikun. It takes all the work out of looking up unknown words in Japanese text in your browser. Click the button to enable it, then you can simply hover over the part you don’t know, and it brings up a box with everything you need to know about that word or those characters. The only problem is that it tends to slow down some more advanced websites. Not to mention, you’ll never be able to live without it again! It’s perfect for the lazy in all of us.SkritterThis is my FAVORITE resource for learning Japanese. If you want to be like those Asian kids in your Japanese class who know the meanings of the Kanji before everybody else, then you better bet this is worth your mere 10 bucks a month. It works sort of like Anki does, only it enables you to actually WRITE the kanji rather than just trying to recognize them. Many people say that it isn’t important to know how to write the kanji. Maybe that’s true, but it is also one of the most fun ways to learn kanji, so I don’t think it should be ruled out.Not only will you learn their writings and meanings, but, if you study the right kinds of words and compounds, you can even learn the readings. That’s right, you will know the kanji BETTER than those super Asian kids. I recommend this for any level of Japanese learner who already knows his/her kana well. Learning kanji is one of the most useful steps to understanding and remembering any word. But you don’t have to take my word for it. A free month long trial is just a few clicks and key presses away.RealKanaWhen I was still at a low level, I remember kana seemed pretty daunting. I maintained this attitude until I found this site. It may not be of use to anybody but beginners, but for them, this can be a life saver.Tofugu’s Japanese Particles CheatsheetThis was one of the most amazing single sheets of paper I ever laid eyes on. It helped me a lot to understand Japanese particles. I actually printed a bunch of copies of this and shared it with my classmates last year.Denshi JishoI’ve tried many online JapaneseEnglish dictionaries, but this one is the best by far. It wins with itss clean interface, and its quick links to sentence examples and kanji lookup. Also, the “common words” feature is a godsend.Almost Made It———-There were a few that barely missed my mark. Here is the list, with short explanations of why they lost out.Textfugu – It looks amazing, but I’m a cheap person so I’ve never gotten very deep into it.Gakuu – I’ve looked at some of the free articles, and they felt really good, but I’ve never actually paid for it so I can’t speak for 95% of the articles thereReadTheKanji – I’ve used the free part, and I like the concept but it’s way too easy and the way it makes you enter reading is kind of quirky, calling some things incorrect when they weren’t really.NihongoUp – There again, never paid, but I’ve used a few of the very useful pdfs available there.Anki iOS – I’ve used the Android version, but the iOS version is obscenely expensive.Honorable mentions———-Here lie the brave resources who fought bravely and did not make Tofugu’s list, but I feel they deserve mentioning.All Japanese All The TimeThis is where you go if you need motivation to learn Japanese. The guy who wrote the website learned Japanese very quickly just by constant exposure. He says that you can basically learn a language just by doing everything in that language. I tend to follow these principles a lot.Midori (iOS app)I used to use my Android phone as my dictionary, with the free apps WWWJDIC and Aedict, but neither of these could compare to the cleanliness and speed of the iOS app Midori on my iPod Touch. Midori does cost some of your precious dollars, but it is worth it. It has a way to bookmark your words by category, and a stroke recognition Kanji lookup. It streamlines looking up words to the point where you can look anything up and bookmark it in 10 seconds or less. Very useful when on a bus reading something in Japanese. And that leads right on into…YesAsiaThere are many sites to buy genuine Japanese material from, and I’m certainly no expert in them, but for all of my intents and purposes, YesAsia has served me perfectly. In my opinion, the best way to learn Japanese is to constantly be reading, speaking, hearing, or writing it. This becomes much easier when you have an entertaining Japanese manga within reach at all times. I recommend buying a few different books so you get free shipping, then keeping one near you at all times. And don’t but anything unless you want to buy it. If the material doesn’t interest you, then this method makes no sense.Kanji DamageI only very recently discovered this website, but it pretty much represents how I learn kanji. It’s best to assign meanings to all of the components, then make up stories. Check the website out if you feel like you’ve hit a dead end learning kanji.The Podcast Thread from koohii.comforum.koohii.com/viewtopic.php?id=5782&p=1This is an invaluable resource for Japanese listening. If you haven’t realized yet, I’m a huge advocate of constant exposure to learn a language, and this can satisfy the need for new listening material for a long time.Kid’s News WebsitesWebsites like kids.goo.ne.jp and kids.yahoo.co.jp are excellent places to work on some reading without all of the stress of trying to make it through a real, adult newspaper article. Used in combination with the earlier recommended Rikaichan, this is can be really educational, assuming you can swallow your pride and hang out on a website designed for children.

  • Corbet Butler

    I used Genki at college for my beginning level Japanese, and it was very fluid and easy to follow. Also, 95% of the book is in pure, unadulterated Japanese. It’s impossible to progress through the book without applying what you learn, so those who are weak in the heart should look elsewhere.

    Also, from what I used of Textfugu, it is a great, easy, and fun way to learn lots of tough Japanese. The best part: you don’t even find it difficult. It’s a matter of breaking it down, learning it, and building off of old concepts. It’s like this old proverb I heard one time…

    “You can’t eat an elephant all at once; you must take small bites.” – Corbet’s Mom

    Truer words have never been spoken. 

  • http://thepretentiousgamer.blogspot.com Rachel

    I love Japanese the Manga Way. It’s a textbook that has examples that feel real and was accessible before my kana was good and is still useful now that I know a bit of kanji. During my year of Japanese language study, I often looked to this book for extra insights on grammar (other textbooks sometimes delay talking about certain aspects of linking words, which can result in confusion).

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000019638025 Cai Lu

    Denshi jisho is my favorite online Japanese dictionary because it’s easy to search for words in either direction, in English and Japanese.  It has a simple layout, you can search for vocabulary and then click on the kanji to see what they mean; you can also search for sentences that the dictionary has for what word you are looking for. It doesn’t have sentences for every vocab, but if you supplement it with Lang-8, it works pretty well.

    There’s also a neat feature: when  you’re search a word, say in English, the search results will give you Japanese words and the ones that are more commonly used are marked in green so you’ll know! You probably won’t be using the archaic words unless you’re trying to be samurai-like. :)

  • Jarom B Reid

    Rikaikun/chan has been tremendous for me.  Even though I have worked for years as a Japanese tour guide in Hawaii, my kanji is pretty awful.  As a tour guide, I met Japanese friends every day, and if they were cool enough, I exchanged email addresses with them.  Every day I email my new friends in Japanese (which looks deceptively good thanks to Microsoft) expecting replies in Japanese.  Without Rikaikun I wouldn’t get 2 sentences in without turning to my Japanese dictionary.  But with it I get the furigana and definition, teaching kanji and vocabulary simultaneously. #winning

  • Jarom B Reid

    Rikaikun/chan has been tremendous for me.  Even though I have worked for years as a Japanese tour guide in Hawaii, my kanji is pretty awful.  As a tour guide, I met Japanese friends every day, and if they were cool enough, I exchanged email addresses with them.  Every day I email my new friends in Japanese (which looks deceptively good thanks to Microsoft) expecting replies in Japanese.  Without Rikaikun I wouldn’t get 2 sentences in without turning to my Japanese dictionary.  But with it I get the furigana and definition, teaching kanji and vocabulary simultaneously. #winning

  • tyler.m43@gmail.com

    Many people will recommended the obvious choices like Genki or try to kiss ass picking Text Fugu
    (did i mention that is a wonderful way to lean Japanese :P)  but I
    personally love Japanese the Manga Way. It teaches the Japanese grammar
    through a way that’s easy to understand, and the manga makes it much
    easier for me to remember. I admit it doesn’t teach vocab (and there for
    kanji) very well, but for me learning grammar first frees me up to
    learn the vocab. That’s the reason I chose Japanese the Manga Way over
    traditional textbooks :)

  • Nicholas Kew

    i Love Textfugu :) Currently a lifetime member already and loving everything about it! The best place to learn Japanese by far, why? It is because everything there is easy to relate to, period. :) Go get Textfugu!

  • tyler.m43@gmail.com

    Many people will recommended the obvious choices like Genki or try to kiss ass picking Text Fugu
    (did i mention that is a wonderful way to lean Japanese :P)  but I
    personally love Japanese the Manga Way. It teaches the Japanese grammar
    through a way that’s easy to understand, and the manga makes it much
    easier for me to remember. I admit it doesn’t teach vocab (and there for
    kanji) very well, but for me learning grammar first frees me up to
    learn the vocab. That’s the reason I chose Japanese the Manga Way over
    traditional textbooks :)

  • Nicholas Kew

    i Love Textfugu :) Currently a lifetime member already and loving everything about it! The best place to learn Japanese by far, why? It is because everything there is easy to relate to, period. :) Go get Textfugu!

  • Chiruba

    Textfugu and Anki are my weapons of choice. Textfugu is great, as it’s completey different to any other way of learning, and works brilliantly. Granted it may not be for everyone, however if you have the initiative to go out there to teach yourself Japanese, chances are it will suit you.

    All the updates, the community within and the funny fugu fish make it my favourite resource :)

    Anki goes hand in hand with textfugu. It’s free and is easy to use. What more could you want?

  • Chiruba

    Textfugu and Anki are my weapons of choice. Textfugu is great, as it’s completey different to any other way of learning, and works brilliantly. Granted it may not be for everyone, however if you have the initiative to go out there to teach yourself Japanese, chances are it will suit you.

    All the updates, the community within and the funny fugu fish make it my favourite resource :)

    Anki goes hand in hand with textfugu. It’s free and is easy to use. What more could you want?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000510513077 Ross Spencer

    I recommended Anki, AnkiMobile, Kotoba!, Genki, Japanese the Manga Way, and Rikaichan! I shared this on Twitter (rspencer2) and facebook (Ross Spencer). I’d like you to add AnkiDroid for Android users! It’s an open source Anki port to Android!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000510513077 Ross Spencer

    I recommended Anki, AnkiMobile, Kotoba!, Genki, Japanese the Manga Way, and Rikaichan! I shared this on Twitter (rspencer2) and facebook (Ross Spencer). I’d like you to add AnkiDroid for Android users! It’s an open source Anki port to Android!

  • Anonymous

    I have done 4 or so years of college Japanese classes (translation, speaking, writing), but all that time and money invested into those courses just didn’t turn out results for me. With the impending doom of going to Japan for the first time in about 5 months, I’ve been studying by myself (fortunately, the sheer terror of being in a foreign country has been a big motivating factor) and using a lot of different resources. The ones that I recommended are:

    Japanese the Manga Way – I’m about half way through it and I love it. Having manga integrated into learning grammar and vocab motivates me to keep learning because it’s fun! However I think that this is a book for those who have already had some other basis in Japanese. I think it’d be tough for a beginner to find this book very useful or easy to understand. Oh, and I love the comic “What’s Michael,” which the author uses in this book. :3

    Anki – Anytime I encounter a word I don’t know when I’m studying my various materials, I put it into my deck in Anki and try to review it everyday. I’ve been very surprised just how effective this has been for learning new words. I don’t even have great memory skills either.

    Japanese Pod 101 – I work full time but I have a job that allows me to multitask, so I’ve started listening to the beginner series of pods. They can get pretty goofy, but I do think you get to learn phrases and cultural information that is very useful and that you don’t hear in classes. I would highly recommend the Survival Phrases pods for anybody of any level. For example, I just learned how to exchange money into yen…

    It’s not on the list but I also have a box of 1,000 Japanese vocabulary cards made by Vis-Ed. I pick out 6 everyday and take them to work, then look at them from time to time throughout the day. I don’t have one of them fancy iPhones so I like having these around when I’m not by a computer and have a spare moment. :)

    I haven’t started reviewing or learning kanji again yet but I’m contemplating trying out “Remembering the Kanji.” I would love to hear what everyone thinks of this book/method of kanji learning. I also would like to try the other resources on the list once I move on from my current ones. ^^;

    Err… not sure if my email is visible or not. tekunoredii@gmail.com

  • Mark Morikawa

    I recommended Denshi Jisho. To appreciate a good thing, you gotta go through a bad thing. That bad thing is Freedict.com, a terrible online dictionary for Japanese (and probably any language). I thought to myself “I guess my life sucks because this is the only online dictionary I know of.” Then I discovered Denshi Jisho. It was the dictionary I was looking for. With it, I can learn words and Kanji as it aids me in my study, watching Japanese dramas and interpreting my Japanese friends on Facebook!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=526125712 Breana Clark

    I love TextFugu because it’s totally froody!

    Tae Kim’s grammar guide is wonderful!  So much info for free..  <3
    It covers everything, from the really basic, to the very advanced, so it's good in that it grows with you..  good for me, since it's hard to find free resources for more advanced Japanese learning (at least easily).  I think, though, that to use it, you have to have some good knowledge of *English* grammar to be able to use it fully (it's kinda hard to learn another language if you don't know how to properly use the language you're learning it from, after all).

    Remembering the Kanji is perfect, because I need all the help learning kanji that I can get.  ^^;

    Japanese for Busy People is great, but I find it a little hard..  it probably would be better if I had a teacher, I must admit.

    I *love, love love* Rikaichan!  I don't think I could live without it.. one of the first things I started looking for to put on my new Android phone. lol

    Anki is nice, since you can take already-made lists…  the best replacement for Smart.fm, I think.

    Lang-8 is good, since you can get some nice feedback, and help people learn in return.  (I sometimes wonder, though, if the people on there aren't playing some big joke on us all, and trying to teach us horrible Japanese, just because they think it's funny.  Just kidding!)

    JapanesePod101 is excellent for practicing with comprehension, and working on my pronunciation.

    Forvo also helps out tons with pronunciation.  (I use it for all kinds of stuff, not just Japanese.  ^^;  I'm a geek like that).

    The Tofugu cheat sheet is soooo adorable (and useful), although I am to the point where I'm advanced enough not to need it.. but, it would have been so helpful when I was trying to learn the particles.

    The NihonShock cheat sheet is very, very useful for me, though, since I have trouble remembering verb conjugations and endings..  I'm considering my wallpapering my room in copies of it.  ^-^  
    (I don't think that my mother would appreciate my wallpapering everything in the new house we're building, though…  (we're from Joplin, luckily our insurance didn't screw us over like some companies did to other people there).  Maybe she'll let me paper the closet.  haha).

    And, the Textfugu hiragana and katakana charts are super-elegant.. I'm thinking I will paper one wall in those, and the rest in the NihonShock ones.  lol

    Denshi Jisho is great, another thing for learners…  it's so useful…  if only it came in a print version!  (imagine how big it would be, though. O.o)

    ALC is also nice…  but, it doesn't have the sometimes-wonky translations of sentences that Denshi Jisho has. (some of those literally make me laugh out loud).

    And….  man, I'm a geek…  *^-^* 
    It looks like all I do is study Japanese, judging from how long my comment is.  LOL
    (it isn't far from the truth.  XD  Hopefully starting college in the fall won't interfere too much with my ability to continue improving my Japanese.)

    My email is:
    iheartllawliet (at) aol (dot) com

    Thanks for such an interesting idea, here, Koichi!  ^^
    And, thank you for the Japanese language resource page, it's a lifesaver!  Now, if only there were some Android applications..  *hint, hint*. lol  (kidding, I understand that you only want to recommend the best!  So, it just means that there isn't something you like enough yet to recommend.)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=526125712 Breana Clark

    I love TextFugu because it’s totally froody!

    Tae Kim’s grammar guide is wonderful!  So much info for free..  <3
    It covers everything, from the really basic, to the very advanced, so it's good in that it grows with you..  good for me, since it's hard to find free resources for more advanced Japanese learning (at least easily).  I think, though, that to use it, you have to have some good knowledge of *English* grammar to be able to use it fully (it's kinda hard to learn another language if you don't know how to properly use the language you're learning it from, after all).

    Remembering the Kanji is perfect, because I need all the help learning kanji that I can get.  ^^;

    Japanese for Busy People is great, but I find it a little hard..  it probably would be better if I had a teacher, I must admit.

    I *love, love love* Rikaichan!  I don't think I could live without it.. one of the first things I started looking for to put on my new Android phone. lol

    Anki is nice, since you can take already-made lists…  the best replacement for Smart.fm, I think.

    Lang-8 is good, since you can get some nice feedback, and help people learn in return.  (I sometimes wonder, though, if the people on there aren't playing some big joke on us all, and trying to teach us horrible Japanese, just because they think it's funny.  Just kidding!)

    JapanesePod101 is excellent for practicing with comprehension, and working on my pronunciation.

    Forvo also helps out tons with pronunciation.  (I use it for all kinds of stuff, not just Japanese.  ^^;  I'm a geek like that).

    The Tofugu cheat sheet is soooo adorable (and useful), although I am to the point where I'm advanced enough not to need it.. but, it would have been so helpful when I was trying to learn the particles.

    The NihonShock cheat sheet is very, very useful for me, though, since I have trouble remembering verb conjugations and endings..  I'm considering my wallpapering my room in copies of it.  ^-^  
    (I don't think that my mother would appreciate my wallpapering everything in the new house we're building, though…  (we're from Joplin, luckily our insurance didn't screw us over like some companies did to other people there).  Maybe she'll let me paper the closet.  haha).

    And, the Textfugu hiragana and katakana charts are super-elegant.. I'm thinking I will paper one wall in those, and the rest in the NihonShock ones.  lol

    Denshi Jisho is great, another thing for learners…  it's so useful…  if only it came in a print version!  (imagine how big it would be, though. O.o)

    ALC is also nice…  but, it doesn't have the sometimes-wonky translations of sentences that Denshi Jisho has. (some of those literally make me laugh out loud).

    And….  man, I'm a geek…  *^-^* 
    It looks like all I do is study Japanese, judging from how long my comment is.  LOL
    (it isn't far from the truth.  XD  Hopefully starting college in the fall won't interfere too much with my ability to continue improving my Japanese.)

    My email is:
    iheartllawliet (at) aol (dot) com

    Thanks for such an interesting idea, here, Koichi!  ^^
    And, thank you for the Japanese language resource page, it's a lifesaver!  Now, if only there were some Android applications..  *hint, hint*. lol  (kidding, I understand that you only want to recommend the best!  So, it just means that there isn't something you like enough yet to recommend.)

  • Vitor Eiji Justus Sakaguti

    #1 is Tae Kim’s Guide to Japanese, it was the best thing I ever found when I was a beginer and it was amazingly helpful.

    #2 is Rikaichan. I just can’t live without it. Knowing all the grammar from TK’s guide and using Rikaichan you can read a LOT of stuff.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000301140148 Heidi Bathory

    Mango Languages:
    It’s a great way to learn Japanese if your planning to visit Japan. It first gives you a small conversation to listen to before each lesson, and this conversation in the beginning of each chapter is what your going to be learning. It then breakes down each sentence, word, and it’s origin, and then gives you the word, and gives you around 5 seconds to say/remember the word. After you are done your lesson, you can leave or take a break, and the next lesson will give you a new conversation. It also reviews words and sentences you learned in previous lessons to insure you have learned them. As you finish chapters, it will challenge you sometimes and ask things like “if you know how to say this, how would you say this?”.
    Mango Languages is a great resource, it has romaji, kana, and it even has cultural sidenotes in the middle of some chapters to make sure you know some cultural facts and standards about Japan, so when you leave for Japan, you don’t make a fool of yourself when you turn ‘左’ (hidari;left),  into someones house when the stranger that gave you directions said ‘右’ (migi;right).

  • Jedunster

    I recommend Remembering the Kanji because it is a fun approach to learning the kanji and is much more painless than other techniques. I also recommended Anki because it is a great flashcard program which handles the task of scheduling without needing to go through any hassle. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=699560075 Michael W Macmullin

    I Recommended Japanese for everyone because the pictures one the cover remind me of a video i saw once the video was very funny so i thought that was worth a recommendation. Textfugu Because your sticking it to the man and his institutionalized learning methods. And JapanesePod101 because it truly does have an extensive library of pod casts and audio files to learn from. I would also like to Recommended the Michael Thompson Japanese language CDs as there likely the best learn and listen style CDs out there. and the web site Yesjapan as the videos on the site are so funny that it makes learning Japanese very fun.

  • sophiebee

    I recommended Kotoba because I study Japanese by distance education in highschool and have nobody to ask for help so when I’m stuck so I always use this app to look up words, kanji and how to change verbs.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bob-Roberts/100000499401710 Bob Roberts

    Hey Guys!So here’s my choices :

    Japanese for Everyone – I started learning japanese in high school, and later  when I was kind of “stalling out”, I ran across this book. I go back to it from time to time, but for the most part, my now well-loved and seriously beat up old copy was a valuable resource!

    Rikaichan – When online, using this is faster than gong to my iphone for Kotoba! (I’m gettin there!)!

    Japanese pod 101 – I DL these to my phone and listen in the car….best way to get the listening practice.

    And last but CERTAINLY not least, KOTOBA! – What can I say about this? I don’t know how many times this program came to my linguistic rescue while in Japan! I’ll also randomly pop into the proggy and just look up stuff if I fand myself waiting on the wife while shopping etc  : )

    Thanks guys!!

  • Dan_plus_o

    Hello, I would like to highly recommend three resources that I use for learning Japanese.

    The first resource is the almighty and user friendly TextFugu! I unfortunately have not come by the spare cash to buy a lifetime subscriptions but I have been through all the free lessons more then a few times and I can definitely tell it’s worth getting a lifetime subscriptions. Textfugu has a very nice layout that is not too overwhelming and is loaded with nice pictures and great inspirational phrases. Koichi doesn’t just present you with great lessons but he also helps you with studying and has study plans at the end of the lessons. Having the study plan at the end of the lesson is a great idea and is missing from a lot of other Japanese learning resources. You can have a great lesson but if you don’t know how to study it properly, it won’t be very effective. For those reasons I can highly recommend Textfugu. I’m for sure going to get a lifetime subscription as soon as I get the spare cash… Darn Bills!!

    My second recommended resource is Lang-8. This site is really great and I highly recommend it to anyone learning another language. The idea of Lang-8 is to write journal entries and then have native speakers correct your mistakes. This is great because everyone is able to help each other and it creates a great community. I have met a few very nice Japanese people on Lang-8 that I regularly email and keep in contact with. Another great thing about Lang-8 that I think a lot of people don’t think of doing is to follow other people learning Japanese. I like to find people that are around my same skill level and follow all of their entries. By doing this I can see what the most common mistakes beginners make and make sure I don’t fall into the same problems. The best way to learn is by your own mistakes but why not learn by your own mistakes and the mistakes of others.

    My third recommended resource is “Remembering the Kanji” by James W. Heisig. I was able to find this book second hand for a good price and I am glad I did. This book uses the mnemonics approach to teach you Kanji and anyone who is familiar with this style of learning knows it is a great way to learn. I would definitely recommend reading through the Kanji and then closing your eyes and imaging everything you just read as if you were in that exact situation. This is proven to help greatly with remembering things.

    I could of recommended much more but I would rather recommend the resources that I actually use on a regular basis. I haven’t used Textfugu in a while but that’s because I can only go through the free lessons so many times. As soon as I get the spare cash to buy a lifetime membership, I will be rocking textfugu every day.

    Thanks for reading my recommendation and thanks koichi for the awesome opportunity to win some sweet stuff. Good luck to everyone! 

  • Judith Stockem

    I recommended ReadtheKanji. I love it, it’s a really quick way to really memorise those kana.

  • Judith Stockem

    I recommended ReadtheKanji. I love it, it’s a really quick way to really memorise those kana.

  • Gleng

    I recommend Japanese the Manga way. It’s good for people who love to read manga and you get to also learn informal Japanese which is better if you want to speak to a friend or something like that. Using manga, you get to have lots of fun while learning lots of useful Japanese. 

  • Grujcyk

    Hellowz, I recommended only two resources – RTK1 and Anki-for two reasons:
    1. As Kanji seems to be a biggest problem to most japanese basic-to-intermediate learners (as it is for me now-I’d say I’m intermediate now), the synergy of using mnemonics from RTK1 and putting them into spaced repetition system of Anki is just unbelievable, it’s definitely over 9000 in scale of japanese learning efficiency for me ; )
    2. zkanji dictionary is still not added to the resources page, if it was it would be my third recommendation ;)

    以上です ;)

  • Ross Spencer

    Oops I forgot to give my reasons for my recommendations! Haha! For things NOT on the list I recommend AnkiDroid and Aedict! AnkiDroid is an open source port of Anki to Android so in case the dev were, say, smacked in the face by a Tanuki’s huge testicals or forgot to check for evil Obake by saying もしもし when answering the phone, someone else could take over. It’s nice because now the dev has like 15 helpers helping him work out the kinks in the nightly builds and translating it into different languages. Aedict is this really cool dictionary that lets you use like 4 different Japanese dictionaries at once. It’s also for Android. Anyway, I use Anki for everything from Spanish reviewing, Japanese learning with Genki (my first actually not boring as golf [literally watching grass grow] textbook), and even to plan my future world domination with orders of which countries/target audience to take over first (start with the young impressionable children that watch the Disney Channel, then work my way up to the hicks so I have disposable troops that know how to do labor, work shotguns, etc.). Genki is a nice textbook with lots of pretty pictures (FINALLY AN EDUCATIONAL BOOK WITH PICTURES!), except the annoying Mary is about as interesting as Bella from Twilight. And of course, it DOES have text, but I’ve learned to deal with that. ;) Unfortunantly, there aren’t any stroke order drawings or even any real lessons on Kanji, so you’ll want to grab Remembering the Kanji for that horribleness (OR TEXTFUGU! Except I’ve never tried textfugu past the free Kanji lessons which were a bit, how do I say this, Kanjiless. I’d like to actually get textfugu some day, but now I’m on a tight budget and just don’t have the money for it now…). Kotoba! is a nice little dictionary for iPhone and is free, aka the price of air. I’ve found it muy helpful. Not sure what else to say… :awkward/: Oh, and I use Rikaikun instead of Rikaichan (it’s the Chrome port) and it’s more helpful than a Tanuki’s ginormous ballsack. I gotta go stfu (stop that flying unicorn; aka a pegasus) and jfdi (jump, fly, drop, and Idk). Ross out. お休みなさい。 ♪(*^^)o∀*∀o(^^*)♪ヾ(@⌒ー⌒@)ノ☆彡
    Ps I did Facebook by accident so use this email if by some chance I were to overcome my suckishly bad luck and win something awesome like, say, textfugu permenently (I know it’s randomly selected, but that and the packs for Anki are the only prizes I like lol.)

  • Leon Pritchard

    Recommened (maybe went a tad overboard) most things I use and like the sound of… becuase your worth it ;) lol.

  • Michael

    I recommended Textfugu only because its the Chuck Norris of learning Japanese! Seriously, its great for any self learner who wants a somewhat painless and fun way to learn Japanese. I also recommended ReadTheKanji because it honestly makes you feel like a boss after seeing how much kanji you’ve learned, and the website overall is just so great at helping anyone learn kanji.

  • Pulsing_Pressure

    Tae Kim’s Guide to Learning Japanese is great, it’s what I’ve been using so far. Anki removes the hassle in physical index cards, so that’s pretty helpful (as long as my laptop still has juice in it). I can’t afford a TextFugu forever subscription, and my parents would never let me use their card to subscribe! :'( By the way, thank you for making the Japanese language and culture entertaining!

  • http://www.spurked.com Peter Joseph

    I don’t have facebook D:

  • RoomC

    Genki has been my
    number 1 go to book for a while now. Unlike most books it gets right
    into the Japanese and banishes any English from touching it’s pages
    rather early on. The price of these books are rather high (with an
    RRP of £57.18) which can be a bit of a turn off, so if you want
    something a little cheaper but still worth your time, TextFugu is
    always good! But I would defiantly recommended Genki hands down as
    being my personal best book for learning Japanese!

    (email: cshep1991@hotmail.com)

  • RoomC

    Genki has been my
    number 1 go to book for a while now. Unlike most books it gets right
    into the Japanese and banishes any English from touching it’s pages
    rather early on. The price of these books are rather high (with an
    RRP of £57.18) which can be a bit of a turn off, so if you want
    something a little cheaper but still worth your time, TextFugu is
    always good! But I would defiantly recommended Genki hands down as
    being my personal best book for learning Japanese!

    (email: cshep1991@hotmail.com)

  • yunteng

    I’ve actually recommended “Japanese, the Manga Way”. I was pretty surprised that it was on the list of Japanese resources, I personally chanced across this book around four years ago and immediately bought it. I spent most of my December break reading it (I’m still a student haha) and I picked up TONS of Japanese vocabulary. What I like is that it really teaches you the rules and HOW to use them, in a very comprehensible and easily-understood manner.

    The following year, I started learning Japanese formally, and I was amazed (and pleasantly surprised) and how much I already knew. It really helped me build a good foundation for my subsequent years of learning, and now here I stand, four years of learning Japanese and taking JLPT N2 at the end of this year. It’s really good at serving as a foundation, and I never regretted the fifty bucks I spent on it.

  • Dominic Neumayer

    I recommended rikachan(RevTK Community Edition),it’s perfect for beginners,who don’t know that much kanji yet(like me^^) and yet still dare to engage in a lot of conversations with Japanese Natives(with my “crappy Japanese”) on Twitter. It’s a true lifesaver.Rikachan for the Win!!!
    Furthermore I recommended Anki! Seriously what would learning Japanese be without Anki (and rikaichan)?Dozens of premade decks and an easy-to-use UI to create new decks and cards.
    All in all those two programms are a great help for the japanese Student. (E-Mail:x3attacks@gmail.com)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1038727404 Miriam Francos

    Well  firstly I recommended the book ‘Japanese for Everyone’ because although I was a bit worried about how big it was, I wasn’t distracted by any romaji because everything was in Hiragana or Katakana (and later Kanji) and it had cute illustrations in it. I’m also more of a textbook style learner, so it’s easier and more fun for me to sit down with the textbook and learn by writing and reading. 

    I also highly recommend the Japanesepod101 audio tracks which I tend to listen to on the way to school. They have fantastic speakers who are really entertaining to listen to and you can tell that they really enjoy what they do. The website is good, though you only get the most from it when you get the free trial of the premium audio. When you do, I recommend you already know which audio your most interested in and DOWNLOAD, DOWNLOAD, DOWNLOAD and when I g0t mine I must have downloaded about 100+ tracks…and hoarded them.

    Textfugu’s hiragana and katakana charts were also a godsend for me, and I printed them back to back, highlighted and laminated them (something you need to know about me – I love stationary!) and spent ages learning them. Once I was familiar I found out the stroke order and got my head round the kana. Again, your cheatsheet to particles also helped me out greatly (hence the recommendation) as it is brilliantly made – it doesn’t overwhelm you with all the particles, just the more common ones and it’s easy and clear to read. Again I found the need to highlight and laminate that too!

    And finally I used the ‘Kotoba!’ app on the iPhone all the time, and it’s easy to use, good looking (oh-er) and means I can look up words on the go. As with any dictionary, it also allows me to search for rude words in Japanese and giggle over them/use them in everyday conversation. 

    Just in case the facebook email thingey didn’t take my email is: miriamfrancos[at]dsl[dot]pipex[dot]com

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1591608013 Elysia Womersley

    To start with Textfugu, as a self-learner this resource has given me a lot more structure in my learning as there are individual lessons within seasons and downloadable vocabulary lists to get studying… which brings me to my second recommendation, Anki! 

    It’s a shame that smart.fm closed and became a pay site, but Anki, which is a free resource, is just as good (if a little bit less flashy looking) ^^ I love to use Anki because it keeps me on track with my revision. I’m sure that without it I would be struggling to remember all this vocabulary… And my handwriting’s not brilliant so writing hundreds of flash cards out would just be a failure!

    Lastly, lang-8 is a wonderful site. Getting corrections and insight from native speakers is always a boost when learning a language, and guess what? You can use it for practising up to two languages for free (premium gives more features, I believe)! It’s a real help and the added bonus is that everyone on there seems to be super-nice =) although this means I actually spend more time correcting journals of friendly Japanese people rather than writing my own too often ;_;

    I really would like to give Gakuu a go in the future, probably when I’ve covered a bit more of the Textfugu content! It seems like it would be very useful for advanced students who want to keep up their reading ability when they’re not sure what to do next with their studying…

  • http://thefineapps.com Clarence Olivier

    I liked Reading the Kanji.

    First, I love how the program adapts to your knowledge, so that it’ll test you for the things that you suck at more.

    Second, the website excels at simplicity. The main two features are “The Quiz” (test your knowledge) and “Stats” (See how are you doing). No whistles and bells here, just what you need.

    I can see myself using this tool frequently.

  • IchiStyle

    I’ve been learning the language for some time now, and have made use of it in Japan itself, so I reckon myself to be a intermediate/advanced learner. :)

    I recommended Anki, Tae Kim’s Guide to Learning Japanese, Lang-8 and Gakuu!

    Since I’ve started learning Japanese I’ve made use of tons of resources to make sure that I was actively learning every part of the Japanese language.  Anki has been a huge help in making sure that no matter what resources I used there was always some form of daily improvement in my speech, reading and writing due to newly added flashcards. Reading up on Tae Kim’s guide gave me the tools to weave these sentences together and last but not least Lang-8 is a very cool way to test all these gathered skills! I’ve also recommended Gakuu because I really like the initiative! It sounds like a very handy resource that is worth giving a try.

    However these are all resources I am using right now, for a beginner textfugu seems like a very good choice.

  • Rhiannon83

    I recommended Rikaichan because it saves a lot of time and means I don’t have to stop and interrupt my flow when I am reading/working. Jisho.org is great for when I am studying and I want to spend the time looking up and learning new words and getting lots of info but Rikaichan is quick and easy.

    Although I am following RTK i’m not sure that I would recommend it for everyone as I think it suits a certain type of learner more than others.

    I have recommended Textfugu to fellow Japanese learners based on Tofugu and the free lessons as I can’t afford to buy a subscription yet, but I will once I get a job!

    I also use and love Anki and quite a few others on your page but I
    didn’t want to spam my facebook friends, especially only a few of them
    are interested in Japanese!

  • Rhiannon83

    I recommended Rikaichan because it saves a lot of time and means I don’t have to stop and interrupt my flow when I am reading/working. Jisho.org is great for when I am studying and I want to spend the time looking up and learning new words and getting lots of info but Rikaichan is quick and easy.

    Although I am following RTK i’m not sure that I would recommend it for everyone as I think it suits a certain type of learner more than others.

    I have recommended Textfugu to fellow Japanese learners based on Tofugu and the free lessons as I can’t afford to buy a subscription yet, but I will once I get a job!

    I also use and love Anki and quite a few others on your page but I
    didn’t want to spam my facebook friends, especially only a few of them
    are interested in Japanese!

  • Fishy Chips

    I recommended these resources. Having an income of $0 its only free stuff.

    Tae Kim: The site is amazingly detailed. Very good for elaboration on things often described vaguely in other places. I tend to like stuff that have both a “literal” and “figurative” explanations. Great overall source.

    Lang8: I only used it a short amount of time before having my attention diverted to more important things, and besides, my Japanese isn’t quite good enough to really benefit from it a whole lot. That said, it is an amazing example of a site- for Japanese and English. Don’t use the translator. Defeats the purpose.

    Anki: AMAZING AMAZING!! There are sooo many decks downloadable. I have a couple only, but it really is good. A couple really good one are the “Core 2000 Japanese Vocabulary” deck and the “How to Tell the Difference Between Japanese Particles” deck. Probably the top choice for me, having no money and all. (Bonus: many, many other decks are available. I also have a German one, but there are ones on almost anything.)

    RealKana: Really good tool for those vaguely familiar with the Kana. I personally got about 750% better at Hiragana and Learned Katakana almost entirely off this.

    Rikaichan: Kanji=Huge roadblock for many people on accessing “real” Japanese websites and such. It makes you feel superhuman, and builds your confidence. Don’t abuse it.

    In addition I recommended all the sheets. I have the Ultimate one laminated, and have the Kana charts printed. They are great for a quick check when in doubt.

    I haven’t tried any more of these, but, nevertheless I feel the 5 listed themselves are quite useful. One thing besides these I would recommend are audio programs. I don’t like the Japanesepod101 ones myself, having no money and all, I can’t afford the premium membership, and its just too much hassle to deal with. Plus most of the thing is promoting itself.

  • Basma

    I recommended Textfugu, Anki & Denshi Jisho

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=513461855 Paul Sheen

    http://www.alc.co.jp/index.html is a great site to support your Japanese learning. It sources from a lot of great dictionaries and also acts like a corpus in a way as it uses a lot of online news resources in its searches. It’s great for checking chunks & collocations, sadly I think it is overlooked by many people despite its usefulness.

  • Efrat

    I chose few things:
    1) Anki- it realy helps, and you can use decks of the resources you use. And it’s free!
    2)JapanesepPod101, because it’s good for practicing hearing.
    3)NihonShock’s cheat sheet, because it has so much important things in it, and you can take it everywhere and just take a look if you you need. And of course, it’s free. 
    4)Denshi jisho, because it’s realy good you can look for kanjies by radicals.
    5) Rikaikun and rikauchan, because it helps if you see a word you don’t know.

  • Marcus

    I recommended Lang-8, Anki, rikai-chan and Tae kims guide.

    Lang-8 as it really will help you to learn real natural japanese and it´s also a really fun way of learning while possibly getting new friends!

    Anki, which is in my opinion one of the easiest ways to get atleast that little study time everyday even if you are too busy with work or school to be able to sit hour after hour with tetxbooks.

    Rikai-chan for being the fast way to look upp all those pesky words and knajis hindering your readning! Last but not least I recommend Tae kims guide for being a generally good textbook with easy to understand explenations.margeta-[at]hotmail[dot]com

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1635704913 Even Tolo Dybevik

    Hi! My name is Even, I’m 14 year old from a little city in Norway! :] I reccomended more than one thing, here they are:
    TextFugu: I honestly haven’t got that or payed for it, but I have read all the free lessons and they’re really good and I just know the full TextFugu must be great too!
    Tae Kim’s Guide to learning Japanese: I have both Tae Kim’s apps for my iPhone and the first one is great for Japanese grammar and sentence construction and stuff like that! His Kana app is also very good for remembering them, still have problems with Katakana ;]
    Mango Languages: I reccomended that, I have only tried the free lessons, I signed up twice, one for the Japanese and one for the German. Both of them were great! I can now say Ii tenki desu ne? Which I couldn’t before. And if the rest of the website is just like the free trials. I know it will be awesome and effective!
    Tofugu’s Japanese Particles Cheatsheet: This I reccomended because particles are hard sometimes, therefore I have this cheatsheet on my deskop to look up some of the particles when I wonder, it’s really usefull!
    Kotoba: I have this on my iPod, it’s for learning Kanji, which I haven’t started on yet but I have only taken the easy ones and it seem great!
    I didn’t reccomend any of the dictiponary cause’ I haven’t tried them. But I use one called Tangorin, which is pretty nice and has always helped me with words.

    I really, really wan’t to win either TextFugu (My goal!) or Mango languages since I have been a Japanophile all my life and love Japan and Japanese with all my heart, thank you so much for this opportunity! :] Also I didn’t know where to put my e-mail >_<' Anyways it's: even_td@hotmail.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/nadine.lapworth Nadine Lapworth

    Hey Tofugu! I’ve been stalking the website for ages but this is my first comment, hoorah!
    As a bit of background I’ve only started PROPERLY learning Japanese the past few weeks before I start my degree in it this September! However I’ve been doing little bits here and there for years.

    So, I reccomend…. *drumroll*

    1. TEXTFUGU
    I haven’t been able to purchase a subscription or membership simply because I’m a poverty-stricken student, but I have used the lessons that are available for free and they have explained things in an entertaining, and clear, way. I especially like the way the website is presented as I’m a bit of a picky web-designer myself. I love the clarity of the layout and the easy transitions between lessons. I didn’t think I’d adjust to learning from a screen (who doesn’t like the feel of a good book?) but it actually works for me. The pace is also good for complete beginners like me! Though obviously it can’t be used as a resource on it’s own… you need a place for DRILLING (or shall I say, a bit of Textfugu homework?)

    2. Tae Kim’s Guide to Learning Japanese
    This is an excellent resource for some basic points but in much greater detail than can be found in most other places. I found it easier to print off the PDF’s because otherwise the wall-of-text is a bit off-putting on a screen. I’ve learnt some great information from this website which I haven’t seen elsewhere, and I look forward to gathering more intermediate grammar points as I progress.

    3. Anki
    An obvious reccomendation; making flashcards in real life is a LOT more time consuming and this is a simple and easy way to create them and test yourself. I haven’t really adopted the use of the ‘Easy – Very difficult’ options as I like to practice all the kana that I’m learning again and again to keep them drilled in! However I am sure this would be more useful when learning the Kanji. One niggle I would say is that it’s not the prettiest of software, but that’s just me being picky!

    4. Rikaichan
    I LOVE Rikaichan. For someone who hasn’t learnt many Kanji yet it works wonders for translating (or, trying to make sense of…) sentences online. It is also really useful for grammar, because through this translation you can see the way sentences are constructed. It also gives the kana for all the Kanji that it translates, which is also an awesome feature. Defnitely my favourite resource so far.

    5. Real Kana
    Does what it says on the tin; I love the fact you can choose which kana to revise (which I haven’t seen anywhere else, apart from Anki obviously) which is great for people like me learning them now.

    6. NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet/Tofugu’s Japanese Particles Cheat Sheet
    Both these cheatsheets are great for beginners like me, trying to make sense of the particles and other grammatical points! I like the depth of NihonShock’s sheet, but I also love the simplicity and clarity of Tofugu’s sheet.

    And there you have it!

    (Email: theologay(at)live(dot)co(dot)uk)

    P.S. Thanks for the resource list! It’s the most useful that I’ve found online so far. :)

  • Mark

    Anki, ‘Fugu, Tae Kim, Solid combo, Especially Textfugu, highly reccommended, I’m nearly up to to the top of it though, so its best for beginners, if you’re in Lower Intermediate or above (possibly me) then you should prob try Gakuu (which I haven’t tried yet, but looks good) or try a month of it (like I did, but I’d love to buy a lifetime pass, so I can always do the new stuff as it comes up)

    Anki because you can create your own list OR steal someone elses, and the smart repitition is savage. Also because you need it for Textfugu, all the lists and stuff.

    Tae Kim’s guide because it’s a savage grammar guide, and makes for good iphone reference.

    (email: Mark.1003@yahoo.com)

  • http://twitter.com/tonyplaystation Tony Playstation

    Anki for the iPhone (other smartphones are also available) is really, really good and stuff. 

    Yes it’s expensive for an app, but I can put barely any effort into learning Japanese while I’m in a restaurant, waiting for a bus, having a poo or anywhere else you’d care to mention (except on a plane, despite my protests that I had it on “airplane mode”).

    A few minutes here and there throughout the day has led to me doing 600+ hours of bonus Japanese studying in 9 months! I kid you not when I say that this is a “bitchin'” investment.AnkiMobile. It’s the bee’s knees!

  • http://twitter.com/tonyplaystation Tony Playstation

    Anki for the iPhone (other smartphones are also available) is really, really good and stuff. 

    Yes it’s expensive for an app, but I can put barely any effort into learning Japanese while I’m in a restaurant, waiting for a bus, having a poo or anywhere else you’d care to mention (except on a plane, despite my protests that I had it on “airplane mode”).

    A few minutes here and there throughout the day has led to me doing 600+ hours of bonus Japanese studying in 9 months! I kid you not when I say that this is a “bitchin'” investment.AnkiMobile. It’s the bee’s knees!

  • Only Revolutions

    I recommend Tae Kim’s Guide and Anki, because I don’t have the possibility to buy any kind of resources, a computer and Internet are all I can use, and having learnt English on my own because school didn’t really teach me anything, I’d rather keep learning on my own, at my own pace. At that level,  Anki is a great way to learn new Kanji and vocab, and Tae Kim’s Guide to Learning Japanese (+ Grammar Guide) are very practical ways to learn how to actually speak, phrase things, and I know that if I keep doing a little Japanese every day, I’ll get to the point where I’ll be able to have a normal conversation in Japanese :)

    I also recommend rikaichan (although I use rikaikun), because it is very practical to look up and learn new kanji/words as long as you don’t overuse it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001527558986 Auntie Sinéad

    Textfugu! As corny as it sounds the only bad thing I’ve to say is I wish I’d found it sooner. There are so many resources online that sometimes it can be overwhelming. After a year of self study which saw me jump from one site to another and amount an array of text books and cheat sheets I have  finally  found a resource that teaches and motivates me…and shock horror makes me laugh out loud.

    It really has made me look at my language learning from a new angle. And my mental health is all the better for it!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001527558986 Auntie Sinéad

    Textfugu! As corny as it sounds the only bad thing I’ve to say is I wish I’d found it sooner. There are so many resources online that sometimes it can be overwhelming. After a year of self study which saw me jump from one site to another and amount an array of text books and cheat sheets I have  finally  found a resource that teaches and motivates me…and shock horror makes me laugh out loud.

    It really has made me look at my language learning from a new angle. And my mental health is all the better for it!

  • Shleena Nazeer

    Textfugu – I love using textfugu for learning Japanese, it keeps you motivated to learn, cuts out all of the useless stuff you won’t ever use and they make it so clear and easy to learn. I got the ‘Forever and Ever Plan’ and I would recommend this to anyone. 
    Anki – This program is awesome, it is good for learning new vocab, kanji, hiragana and katakana. I love using this too because I can learn very quickly with this program.  Also the decks that Koichi has made that includes audio so you can listen to the pronounciation is so useful.  Use it!Rikaichan – I’ve only started using this but it is very helpful so far to translate the meanings of Japanese text.RealKana – This was so useful to help me learn my hiragana and katakana and I would recommend it to anyone who wanted to learn all of the kana.Textfugu’s Hiragana and Katakana Charts – These charts are very well laid out which makes it easy to look up any kana which you may have forgot. I’ll have to try some of the other resources that have been put up but so far these are the ones that have been very useful to me.

  • Shleena Nazeer

    Textfugu – I love using textfugu for learning Japanese, it keeps you motivated to learn, cuts out all of the useless stuff you won’t ever use and they make it so clear and easy to learn. I got the ‘Forever and Ever Plan’ and I would recommend this to anyone. 
    Anki – This program is awesome, it is good for learning new vocab, kanji, hiragana and katakana. I love using this too because I can learn very quickly with this program.  Also the decks that Koichi has made that includes audio so you can listen to the pronounciation is so useful.  Use it!Rikaichan – I’ve only started using this but it is very helpful so far to translate the meanings of Japanese text.RealKana – This was so useful to help me learn my hiragana and katakana and I would recommend it to anyone who wanted to learn all of the kana.Textfugu’s Hiragana and Katakana Charts – These charts are very well laid out which makes it easy to look up any kana which you may have forgot. I’ll have to try some of the other resources that have been put up but so far these are the ones that have been very useful to me.

  • Nikki

    I recommended Lang-8 and JapanesePod101.  Lang-8 because if you are learning on your own like I am, its nice to have someone to correct your mistakes.  JapanesePod101 because I like to listen to their podcasts when I’m cleaning.

  • Nikki

    I recommended Lang-8 and JapanesePod101.  Lang-8 because if you are learning on your own like I am, its nice to have someone to correct your mistakes.  JapanesePod101 because I like to listen to their podcasts when I’m cleaning.

  • Guybrush Threepwood

    TEXTFUGU:  Lessons so simple yet engaging, even a monkey (already trained in speaking English) could understand them.  The Season structure really makes it feel like your Japanese is “levelling up”, each lesson giving you an XP boost – though it’s language skills you’re gaining, not androgynous clothes, magic spells and skyscraper-sized demon swords.
    Robin: “Holy Fugu fish, Batman!  My Japanese is already level 3!!”Batman: “Well Robin, I’d say that’s a pretty **INTERMEDIATE AND/OR ADVANCED** level, if you ask me.”

  • http://twitter.com/xianglie Natalie Venning

    Using the Ultimate Nouns (1&2), Adjectives, and Verbs Vocab Packs would make anyone ‘JFDI’ and learn Japanese… my studying partner can tell you how unmotivated I can be but with such pratical cards that can assist moronic amateurs like me and shining intermediates like Ameera I would be able to procrastinate my degree with even more websites in different langauges…. I mean better my life…    :3

    natalie.venning@gmail.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1418095449 Kad Mudkipson

    I recommended Tae Kim’s guide to learning Japanese. There have been many times where I just can’t grasp something that I’m learning from a textbook and need a different explanation to give me a better perspective on it. At times like this, I have always been able to count on Tae Kim’s awesome grammar pages for further help. Even now as an Intermediate learner of Japanese, I still use Tae Kim’s site the most out of all of the resources I own.
    It definitely earns my seal of approval!  ;D

  • Denn0156

    I recommend Denshi Jisho. I tend to get stuck when reading Japanese text so I have “Find Kanji by Radicals” bookmarked. Sometimes it is nice to learn a random kanji by letting the radicals guide me!

    (denn0156@d.umn.edu)

  • Denn0156

    I recommend Denshi Jisho. I tend to get stuck when reading Japanese text so I have “Find Kanji by Radicals” bookmarked. Sometimes it is nice to learn a random kanji by letting the radicals guide me!

    (denn0156@d.umn.edu)

  • codebeard

    Are you someone who can’t remember anything, ever?

    Do bank staff become suspicious when it takes you several minutes to recall your home address?

    Have you already forgotten why you were reading this comment?

    Then, you should get Anki. Get it now. http://ankisrs.net/

    At first, you will say “what the heck, this looks complicated and I don’t really know what I’m doing.” Then, you will watch the intro video on the main page (because I told you to), and you will say “Oh, do want.”

    After a few minutes learning the ropes, you will be making flash cards to remember all the things you want, and learning great habits to study every day. Good luck!

  • Em_15_rainstorm

    I recommend quite a few resources from that list– mostly the free ones!
    One that isn’t free is the Japanese the Manga way– I absolutely love it. The examples are excellent, they give plenty explanation, and you can always read just the manga to test your understanding.
    Then, there’s some free resources I love like Lang-8. You can learn so much about how to speak naturally there, and there’s no shortage of native Japanese speakers! Also, the comments they make are really helpful, too.
    Anki, it’s great, it’s free, you can customize it. Period.
    JapanesePod101, if you just go for the free stuff, does provide a decent amount of audio material and good explanations as well as cultural insights.
    And, last but not least, the NihonShock Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet really does live up to it’s name. Seriously.

  • Em_15_rainstorm

    I recommend quite a few resources from that list– mostly the free ones!
    One that isn’t free is the Japanese the Manga way– I absolutely love it. The examples are excellent, they give plenty explanation, and you can always read just the manga to test your understanding.
    Then, there’s some free resources I love like Lang-8. You can learn so much about how to speak naturally there, and there’s no shortage of native Japanese speakers! Also, the comments they make are really helpful, too.
    Anki, it’s great, it’s free, you can customize it. Period.
    JapanesePod101, if you just go for the free stuff, does provide a decent amount of audio material and good explanations as well as cultural insights.
    And, last but not least, the NihonShock Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet really does live up to it’s name. Seriously.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=642422121 Dávid Halmi

    Hey there,  greetings from Hungary, EU, and here are my recommendations:

    textfugu – it has fugu in its name. how can it be bad?
    remembering the kanji 1 – i have it, i love it, i’m about halfway. fear me! :)
    readthekanji – you had me at the screenshot of the prod.
    ALL japanese vocabulary resources – they’re a MUST
    ALL worksheets / cheatsheets – they’re a MUST too

    good luck everyone!

  • Kaxxina

    I love my kotoba app! Always handy and easy to use! :)

  • Em_15_rainstorm

    Oh, and I forgot to mention– ReadtheKanji is rather useful for learning kanji, even if it’s just familarizing yourself with the characters. I’ve only used the free version, but I’m sure that it would be even more useful if you actually paid for it. However, the free stuff is good too.

  • Michelle

    I recommend the Particles Cheat Sheet, and the  Ultimate Cheat Sheet – because I can’t stand particles and can’t, for the life of me, work out when I should be using which ones, nor can I ever remember how I’m suppose to change a word into it’s potential form, past plain negative, ect, ect – and because who (especially poor high school students) doesn’t love free Cheat Sheets.  :D 

  • Emily Suvannasankha

    I recommended Textfugu, because I’m halfway through the first season and am already loving it! The way it’s written – like Tofugu – makes it fun and funny to read through whether you’re planning on having a hardcore study session or just refreshing your mind with a quick flip through. I thought kanji would be painful, and well, it is, but not as much as I was expecting thanks to the simple terms Textfugu explains each kanji in. I love Koichi’s motivation emails, too – it seems like they go to every length possible to keep you motivated and learning happily. But my favorite part of Textfugu is the welcoming community of fellow fugu-ers that help you along each step of the way. Thanks, Koichi and Hashi, for making the best Japanese textbook ever. ^^
    (email: xyuki.chiix@gmail.com)

  • murasaki

    I have to say I’m a sucker for all things JPod, because I discovered them in their pre-subscription startup phase, and was hooked by the podcast format and the hosts’ charm and humour.  The podcasts were like a radio show to me, and I couldn’t wait to tune in.  When they went subscription, I felt it was worth it because of the format’s convenience (the PDF notes rounded out the lessons nicely) and the fact that the quality was better than anything you could get at the bookstore (or elsewhere online).

    Despite the fact that things have changed in online language learning, JPod still offers a way to start off with a solid base and grow from there in a number of different directions (business, cultural learning, and so forth).  By now they’ve amassed an amazing archive full of lessons, so you can fill in any gaps in your Japanese learning if you started elsewhere or use other resources.  I went back to early lessons just for fun recently, and they still sound fresh and relevant.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=742877953 Karin Siehs

    I’ve recommended this site and the tools I like and use quite a while ago already, since some of my friends are eager to learn Japanese as well and I wanted to let them know of great resources. Since I’m a poor student, it’s free tools only so far – but they’re a great help already :)

    First of all, I’ve stumbled upon Tae Kim’s guide before even knowing about Tofugu, and it helps me a lot with understanding grammar. Might help to have like 1-2 additional (sets of) examples for each part, but it’s very well-written and the contents have made it into one of my Anki decks.

    Speaking of which, Anki/Anki Mobile is the tool I use most right now – each day for 2-3 hours, to be exact. Besides grammar, I also repeat a merged deck of kana and JLPT-4 kanji (plus some words based on them), some core vocab and sentences. I’m looking forward to improve my decks with the thanks-for-recommending-and-commenting pack, thank you so much for granting everyone access to it who takes part in this :D <3

    For my JLPT kanji words addition, I checked ReadTheKanji and copypasted to new Anki cards. It's one of the tools I started with, but since I prefer to be able to learn anywhere and anytime without having to rely on my somewhat unpredictable internet connection, I moved on to Anki. Though I really liked ReadTheKanji's approach with a huge character plus a sentence in which it is used, which proved really helpful.

    Next, Cheat sheets. Since Kana are going quite well by now, I recommended NihonShock's Ultimate and Tofugu's Particle sheets, which are a nice resource to have around if you want to understand when to use which particle. Tae Kim and those where the first resources I found that would distinguish for example wa/ga in a way that everyone would understand, and I was AMAZED to find out that Japanese doesn't require words like "etc." since there's to/ya :D

    Denshi Jisho has been an open browser tab for weeks now. Fun fact: despite this, I still don't recognize the Kanji for "dictionary" whenever it comes up on Anki. Shame on me.
    However, it shows lots and lots of words and I especially like the "Kanji details" page which shows radicals, stroke order, how to read it, meaning and everything else you need to know.

    One thing I didn't recommend is Genki – we used it at a language course at Uni and I felt like I learned a lot more from Japanese TV shows.
    For example, it taught me the differences between kore-sore-are-dore and such, but I simply couldn't figure out when to use kore/kono. Embarrassing, now that I look back and found it REALLY easy to understand, once I found a proper explanation – or maybe I was just not motivated enough to learn it back then :'D
    All I remember is that Japanese people on the CD talk to foreigners like meeeaaariii-saaan extremely slowly – which can be understood as being polite, or thinking we're too dumb to learn it anyway (or both) :P – and that the step from using Romaji to not having them anymore seemed a bit harsh, since you're tempted way too much to rely on them instead of actually learning Kana properly.
    However, I'm sure it has taught lots and lots of people the basics, and the small stories in there were actually nicely written and told.

    Last but not least, I'm really happy to have found this site with all its amazing links and infos, and I'm really thankful for giving everyone this opportunity to win access to some of the best tools for studying Japanese "at home". I've thought about wishing for access to TextFugu and one or two other sites for Christmas, and time will show if you're a Summer Santa ;D
    However, even if the redder and rounder Winter version has to step in, I'll still love this page and all the great stuff on here, just for helping and supporting everyone who is willing to study Japanese in every way you can.

    どうもありがとう。<3

  • Uniko

    I recommend Lang-8 because it’s the only one I’ve ever used!!:P

    Well, that’s just a joke but I really like it! It’s free, easy to start, quick responses by many native speakers. You can write about your daily life, news, novel translation, business letters…anything! And you’ll get natives’ corrections:) It’s really awesome. 
    Thanks Koichi for sharing this great web service!

  • バイソン

    I recommended Genki. It was the first Japanese textbook I ever received. My Japanese-American friend basically gave it to me for free. It helped me build a great foundation with the language, because it was friendly and didn’t scare me away! I love it!

  • http://www.tofugu.com/ Hashi

    Amazing.

  • Ben_R_R

    I recommended Genki I and Text Fugu, I unfortunately have not had a chance to try the others yet.

  • Ben_R_R

    I recommended Genki I and Text Fugu, I unfortunately have not had a chance to try the others yet.

  • Anna ChiakiChama

    I recommend textfugu because it’s well explained and it’s awesomeness and fun-ness make’s it so hard to stop studying! I also recommend Japanese for busy people cuz of all it’s exercises (-though I have a teacher) and I absolutely love Lang-8! It has helped me alot. there is abunch of nice ppl who happily helps you with all your weird-ass grammar and the wtf spellings. :D

  • Hailey

    Textfugu: because I’m a kissa…I mean because it’s amazing. I, unfortunately, don’t have a paid subscription to Textfugu (getting one soon, hopefully!!), but the free lessons on Hiragana and Katakana have helped me learn these two alphabets quicker than I could have ever imagined. So much love for this site <3

    RealKana: I use this site everyday to help me practice my Hiragana and Katakana. Just 10 minutes a day helps me remember all the characters.

    JapanesePod 101: Three years ago, when I first got interested in learning Japanese, this was the first site I used. Seeing it on the recommendation page made me smile so I recommended it =P

  • http://twitter.com/xUsagii 冬魂です。

    I tried not to click everything I’ve used in that list (because there are some that are really good and I wanted to so badly click ‘recommend’ but I haven’t used it long/often enough to give an accurate reason)  but I’m going to try and keep my reasons short and simple (looking at all those comments, especially the long ones makes my brain hurt so good luck lol.)

    TextFugu – The first GOOD resource I found on the Internet. Been using it for over a year now and I’d highly recommend it to anyone trying to learn Japanese – it’s very affordable, witty, fun and actually has this ‘kick’ which makes you want to continue with lessons, it’s actually hard to believe learning Japanese could be that fun. I really wish the lessons were updated more often but it’s still all good.

    Remembering the Kanji 1 – I have the book (I like to support the Author) but it’s an extremely helpful book for learning to write and remember the kanji radicals. Sometimes his memorization ‘stories’ aren’t very helpful (quite a few I am remembering have been the stories I have made up which are better for me) but very beneficial nonetheless.

    Lang-8 – I don’t really write Japanese journal entries very often (boo at me!) but it’s inspirational to see other journal entries written by English natives like me wishing to learn Japanese. I actually spend almost all of my time on Lang-8 correcting journals written in English and talking to Japanese natives, helping them to improve in English and telling them about British culture. Should really try and get some Japanese help from them sometime. Also makes me realise that being helpful rather than helped can be a weak point. ^^;

    Anki – amazing for reviewing things like RTK, the kana and vocab. Really helps to drill those pesky ones in my mind. Has been my lifesaver when I have to learn vocab my Japanese tutor has taught me. (Unfortunately during holidays I have no lessons from her so I have to self learn myself – which I usually do combined with the tutoring I get anyway. .__.”)

    Rikaichan – usually when I see words/phrases/sentences/paragraphs I don’t understand/can’t read (curse you kanji!) I used to copy + paste into Google Translate which (most of the time) gave me a very poor, rough translation – if I was lucky. Now, I can learn meanings and pronunciation of words and phrases (not so much sentences and paragraphs) a lot quicker and usually get a much better and precise translation.

    RealKana – OMG, okay I’d recommend this to absolutely anyone learning kana. I learned all the Hiragana from my Japanese tutor in about 6 weeks (learning 10 Hiragana a week) but I found this website in the middle of learning Katakana. I drilled the whole Katakana ‘alphabet’ into my mind within about an hour and a half – mind you I was about 1/2 way through. It’s SUPER helpful for drilling the kana in your head and most people learn the kana in about a week with this super helpful ‘program’ (not really a program). Old school and basic but one of the best things since sliced bread (err, in terms of Japanese learning).

    Denshi Jisho – a super helpful dictionary. I don’t know how to explain this but it’s awesomeness. (My brain is going dead from all these ‘why’ answers so unfortunately Jisho gets a very short and undetailed reason. SO SORRY, YOU REALLY ARE AWESOME OH LITTLE JISHO. :()

    Okay, this ended up being way longer than I imagined (omgwut, so long – think mine is one of the longest actually, I’M SO SORRY! T_T) but I hope my reasons are good enough. Would be great to win something as an early birthday present (birthday is in September)! ^o^

    ~Winter Spirit <3 -hoping for the best-

    (abbierocks–x@hotmail.com)

  • http://twitter.com/xUsagii 冬魂です。

    I tried not to click everything I’ve used in that list (because there are some that are really good and I wanted to so badly click ‘recommend’ but I haven’t used it long/often enough to give an accurate reason)  but I’m going to try and keep my reasons short and simple (looking at all those comments, especially the long ones makes my brain hurt so good luck lol.)

    TextFugu – The first GOOD resource I found on the Internet. Been using it for over a year now and I’d highly recommend it to anyone trying to learn Japanese – it’s very affordable, witty, fun and actually has this ‘kick’ which makes you want to continue with lessons, it’s actually hard to believe learning Japanese could be that fun. I really wish the lessons were updated more often but it’s still all good.

    Remembering the Kanji 1 – I have the book (I like to support the Author) but it’s an extremely helpful book for learning to write and remember the kanji radicals. Sometimes his memorization ‘stories’ aren’t very helpful (quite a few I am remembering have been the stories I have made up which are better for me) but very beneficial nonetheless.

    Lang-8 – I don’t really write Japanese journal entries very often (boo at me!) but it’s inspirational to see other journal entries written by English natives like me wishing to learn Japanese. I actually spend almost all of my time on Lang-8 correcting journals written in English and talking to Japanese natives, helping them to improve in English and telling them about British culture. Should really try and get some Japanese help from them sometime. Also makes me realise that being helpful rather than helped can be a weak point. ^^;

    Anki – amazing for reviewing things like RTK, the kana and vocab. Really helps to drill those pesky ones in my mind. Has been my lifesaver when I have to learn vocab my Japanese tutor has taught me. (Unfortunately during holidays I have no lessons from her so I have to self learn myself – which I usually do combined with the tutoring I get anyway. .__.”)

    Rikaichan – usually when I see words/phrases/sentences/paragraphs I don’t understand/can’t read (curse you kanji!) I used to copy + paste into Google Translate which (most of the time) gave me a very poor, rough translation – if I was lucky. Now, I can learn meanings and pronunciation of words and phrases (not so much sentences and paragraphs) a lot quicker and usually get a much better and precise translation.

    RealKana – OMG, okay I’d recommend this to absolutely anyone learning kana. I learned all the Hiragana from my Japanese tutor in about 6 weeks (learning 10 Hiragana a week) but I found this website in the middle of learning Katakana. I drilled the whole Katakana ‘alphabet’ into my mind within about an hour and a half – mind you I was about 1/2 way through. It’s SUPER helpful for drilling the kana in your head and most people learn the kana in about a week with this super helpful ‘program’ (not really a program). Old school and basic but one of the best things since sliced bread (err, in terms of Japanese learning).

    Denshi Jisho – a super helpful dictionary. I don’t know how to explain this but it’s awesomeness. (My brain is going dead from all these ‘why’ answers so unfortunately Jisho gets a very short and undetailed reason. SO SORRY, YOU REALLY ARE AWESOME OH LITTLE JISHO. :()

    Okay, this ended up being way longer than I imagined (omgwut, so long – think mine is one of the longest actually, I’M SO SORRY! T_T) but I hope my reasons are good enough. Would be great to win something as an early birthday present (birthday is in September)! ^o^

    ~Winter Spirit <3 -hoping for the best-

    (abbierocks–x@hotmail.com)

  • Qiu Calvin

    Love Denshi Jisho for looking up vocabs after reading the daily Mainichi primary school page. (There’s also this really cool iOS dictionary called Midori with vocabulary translation for passages I copy in! It also draws from WWWJDIC, like Denshi Jisho)

    Also recommended Tae Kim’s Guide. Awesome resource that fills in gaps in grammar by providing some easy-to-understand context to Japanese language.

  • Qiu Calvin

    Love Denshi Jisho for looking up vocabs after reading the daily Mainichi primary school page. (There’s also this really cool iOS dictionary called Midori with vocabulary translation for passages I copy in! It also draws from WWWJDIC, like Denshi Jisho)

    Also recommended Tae Kim’s Guide. Awesome resource that fills in gaps in grammar by providing some easy-to-understand context to Japanese language.

  • Jenwilcher

    I recommend

    Textfugu:  I tend to be a self learner, so this site is perfect.  The fact that the first few lessons are free is a real bonus.  But, what I really like about Textfugu is I can print out as many of the handouts as I like and just keep doing them until I get it down.

    RealKana:  I like the game aspect of it and find it really does help you memorize Hiragana/Katakana characters.

  • Jenwilcher

    I recommend

    Textfugu:  I tend to be a self learner, so this site is perfect.  The fact that the first few lessons are free is a real bonus.  But, what I really like about Textfugu is I can print out as many of the handouts as I like and just keep doing them until I get it down.

    RealKana:  I like the game aspect of it and find it really does help you memorize Hiragana/Katakana characters.

  • Avlor -

    I recommended Japanese Particles CheatSheet, Rikaichan and Lang-8.  I use each of these regularly and can vouch for them.  The particles cheat sheet helped me start to get a grasp of these elusive and tricky little words that are soooo important!  Rikaichan is a tool I use everyday to help decode Japanese and quickly look up words in Japanese.  Lang-8 is great to practice your Japanese and meet new people!

  • Avlor -

    I recommended Japanese Particles CheatSheet, Rikaichan and Lang-8.  I use each of these regularly and can vouch for them.  The particles cheat sheet helped me start to get a grasp of these elusive and tricky little words that are soooo important!  Rikaichan is a tool I use everyday to help decode Japanese and quickly look up words in Japanese.  Lang-8 is great to practice your Japanese and meet new people!

  • bduddy

    Can I win anything by telling you by least favorite Japanese resource? It’s the textbook we use at my college…
    http://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Spoken-Language-Part-1/dp/0300038348

    What I did recommend was the NihonShock cheat sheet – it seems like a lot of good information in two pages.

  • bduddy

    Can I win anything by telling you by least favorite Japanese resource? It’s the textbook we use at my college…
    http://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Spoken-Language-Part-1/dp/0300038348

    What I did recommend was the NihonShock cheat sheet – it seems like a lot of good information in two pages.

  • http://www.facebook.com/zack.el.loco Zack Pablo Millsaps

    For awhile now I have been hard at work learning bits and pieces of Japanese from different online sites and textbooks, never getting far enough to put a dent into my studies.  Am I lazy?  Not at all.  Am I busy?  Yes, but not even close enough to use it as an excuse to not learn Japanese.  After trying many things I have found the things I’ve enjoyed the most.  Here are my recommendations for learning Japanese:

    Textfugu
      Textfugu has helped me advance in my Japanese through the most effective technique I have found, motivation.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been fired up on learning Japanese and I start but then it just dies down and I forget about it for another couple of weeks.  It’s a pain, I’ve been learning Japanese based on a very shallow motivation, but through Textfugu I’ve advanced in learning in a textbook that I feel is someone speaking directly to me teaching me directly.  Textfugu is wonderful and I wish there was a way to learn any language through this program Koichi has gifted us.  Thank you Koichi!

    JapanesePod101
      During my search for anything that teaches Japanese I found JapanesePod101.  Never have I found such amazing work for free on any other website.  Japanese Pod101 has taught me phrases, Japanese culture, and vocabulary in a very convenient way, laying in my bed listening.  I recommend JapanesePod101 to everyone, especially now since you can find them free on iTunes, download the things you’re interested in and then get a dose of Japanese.

    Mango Languages
      I found Mango through my father who was looking for ways to learn German.  When I started Mango Languages in Japanese I took the free trial, back when it was fairly new, and was very impressed.  Some of the longest phrases I know in Japanese I learned from Mango Languages.  It’s way of teaching online is very impressive and the process that they teach you grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation really helped me get to my level in Japanese today.  Mango Languages is perfect for anyone who prefers a more flash interactive way on the internet to learn.

    Well that’s about it.  Thank you for reading!  (tehsaplings@gmail.com)

  • Boywithdreams

    Denshi Jisho:

    This is absolutely necessary for anyone learning Japanese. Denshi Jisho is an intuitive, pretty comprehensive online dictionary for those of us who think thumbing through paper is a waste of time. It gives stroke order for Kanji, a highly useful Kanji by Radicals search query, and gives example sentences with the words. 

    Rikiachan/Rikiakun:

    I recommend this to all of my friends. Even if they aren’t learning Japanese right now, they may want to because this browser extension is so awesome! Just hover over any Japanese text (or Chinese for that matter) and you get Denshi Jisho’s translation. Easy as that. 

    Remembering the Kanji:

    Great, great, great, great. I don’t know why you would learn Kanji as an adult any other way. The problem is there is really no other way. Remembering the Kanji, and also Textfugu, use  fun, creative stories attached to the radicals to come up with a sure-fire way of remembering those 2000 or so little buggers’ meanings. The only setback is that you don’t find out the readings until later, but as long as you are studying Japanese while you do this, it shouldn’t be a problem. 

    Tae Kim’s Guide to Learning Japanese:

    Grammar. Straightforward. Useful. And it doesn’t leave the plain forms until much later like most textbooks do!

    RealKana:

    When I started out, this was where it was at. Drilling the Kana over and over on this site worked wonders. And it is sooooo important to get your Kana down immediately when you start learning Japanese. 

    Read the Kanji:

    Also a neat little site I’ve tinkered around with a bit. I love the feel of it and would love a free subscription….

    Others:

    Rhino Spike is a nifty site I just tried out recently. Along the same lines of working together to correct others’ stuff, Lang 8 is pretty fun too. 

    I’m a little disappointed, however, that iKnow was taken off the list, even though I get it. It’s an awesome resource, even if you don’t pay to do the quizzes. In Japanese Core, the voice talent is authentic (maybe a little too much) and it’s easy to learn other words subconsciously as you are learning the one you are supposed to be learning. 

    Also, and I don’t remember where I found this, but another amazing site for learning grammar is Visualizing Japanese Grammar 

    http://www.gwu.edu/~eall/vjg/vjghomepage/vjghome.htm

    It’s a collection of 66 very in-depth grammar videos, entertaining and full of cute little drawings. Each video even has a short quiz you can take!

    Anyway, thanks for your dedication, humor, and destroying the Japanese learning industry with Textfugu/Tofugu. I’m a big fan.

    Cameron
    (boywithdreams@gmail.com)

  • Anonymous

    Japanese the Manga Way was one of  my first Japanese language books, and it has remained on a prime self position in my bookcase! After learning a few Japanese words and phrases from travel guides and the like, this book gets you putting them together into coherent sentences! It’s a perfect introduction to grammar! JtMW is extremely well organized and very thorough in its explanations. Using sentence examples from manga makes the book fun to work with, but I never feel like the content is “diluted” in any way. It is a MUST HAVE for any Japanese language learner, and it will serve you well from the beginner stage all the way up to intermediate.

    I recommend the ALC dictionary too; it’s great for learning collocations and for seeing how certain words are used in different contexts. It helps me correct the issues that come with word-for-word translations, and  I end up with my sentences sounding much more natural and authentic.

    -Nessa
    (email: ogbuehiva3055@mbc.edu)

  • Jackee

    I recommended Lang-8. I believe it is a valuable resource not just for Japanese but any language. Its one of the few resource from what I know which allows you to use what you learnt from your studies, which in this case is Japanese. You can write about anything you want, whether its your daily life, your travels, or a particular topic you are interested in and would want to write about. The topic is not really the point, so people are free to write about anything and hopefully someone will read it. This in turn gets corrected by native Japanese or those who are fluent and confident enough to highlight your mistakes and correct them using the tools available in Lang-8. Not everyone has the opportunity to have a teacher to correct their mistakes. The most annoying is not knowing where you made the mistake and therefore you won’t know whether you will make the same mistake again in the future. This is what makes Lang-8 useful.

    Also it gives you the opportunity to type in Japanese, as nowadays we live in an age where we are dependent on computers rather than pen/paper so its good practice for your Japanese keyboard typing skills especially where you have to press ‘spacebar’ frequently to find the correct kanji you want to use.

    This will build up your confidence when you see less and less mistakes you are making meaning you are progressing well in your studies and that you are going in the right direction in how you are learning. If you continue to make the same mistake, you will know and  hopefully you will correct the mistakes you are frequently making.

    Not only are you given the opportunity to type and make many sentences by yourself, you can also read other peoples posts and see what kind of mistakes they are making when they are typing in Japanese when its corrected by a Japanese.

    The community there is nice and you are bound to make a few friends there as you interact with them more when helping with each other. Good chance to meet Japanese people especially if you live in an area where it is quite difficult to meet them.

    email: hijack5@hotmail:disqus .com

  • Saitohama

    Having attempted to painstakingly memorize Chinese characters, I would definitely recommend Anki as a time-saver for learning Kanji. Everyone knows how easy it is to remember hiragana/katakana, right? Anki is extremely helpful by providing hiragana ‘subs’ underneath Kanji flashcards- eliminating the need to double-check on google translate ^^  Plus, Anki is available as an app, so you can study on the bus, subway, or even in line at airport security!

  • Pinkcatmints

    I chose Genki 1 because it’s always good to have a steady textbook to reference and for requirement, the Genki series isn’t bad.    I also voted for Tae Kim because that site is abosolutely fantastic in my opinion.  I have been using it to supplement my textbooks.  All the notes about shortening grammar (aka natural human laziness) are especially noteworthy.  I voted for Rikaichan because I use it all the time!  When trying to read a Japanese site or trying to figure out what some fearsome, 15+ stroke kanji means— rikaichan saves!  I have yet to experience Text Fugu in its entirety so I cannot recommend it, but I plan to look into it soon!  Same goes for Japanese the Manga Way.  However, I have used a book that sounds like that one before and it was really interesting.  I was too much of a beginner to understand more than the introductions…. but I did learn how to formally (and by formally I mean in a situation where you are introducing yourself to your fiance/fiancee’s intimidating parents) introduce yourself.  Always a useful lesson.~

  • Andreas L

    Kotoba for iOS is great. I have it on my iPhone and if I want a word translated I get all the different readings, example sentences and even the stroke count for a kanji. I use it together with the Chinese keyboard, which allows me to draw a kanji that I have seen for example in a book, and translate it to English. But if you’re no good at drawing you can compose radicals in the app and find the kanji.

    Another nice thing is that you can see which kanjis the Japanese children are learning in school at a certain grade. How old are you really in Japan?

  • Andreas L

    Kotoba for iOS is great. I have it on my iPhone and if I want a word translated I get all the different readings, example sentences and even the stroke count for a kanji. I use it together with the Chinese keyboard, which allows me to draw a kanji that I have seen for example in a book, and translate it to English. But if you’re no good at drawing you can compose radicals in the app and find the kanji.

    Another nice thing is that you can see which kanjis the Japanese children are learning in school at a certain grade. How old are you really in Japan?

  • Anonymous

    I couldn’t decide which one to pick because there are a few things you’d need for learning Japanese seriously. So I picked a few and spammed my facebook friends xD

    First of all, you’ll need textfugu! I would never be so far without it! It’s motivating, funny and sooo easy! I remember people saying, “Forget about learning Japanese – it’s too hard!” But it doesn’t have to be hard – just use textfugu :D

    Then you’ll need Anki. I’ve never seen a good and FREE vocab trainer like this! And the best thing about it is the name :D I’m called Anki by my friends aswell because my name is Anke!

    Today I registered with Lang-8 and I think it’s a wonderful Idea! I can help other people and they are helping me – I love it, I recommended it!

    And of course is textfugu’s 80-20 rule true und very helpful, so I’d love to have the Ultimate Japanese Vocab Packs! I bet they’re extremely useful, so I recommended one of them aswell – without vocab you can’t speak!

    my e-mail: facebook@shampie.de

  • Sebbe

    Tae Kim’s guide is awesome because its a free place to look up gramma and learn some vocab.
    Remembering the Kanji is awesome because you can learn kanji without writing it 10 000 times :)
    Anki in use with RtK is nice and a good way to keep the things you have studied fresh.
     

  • http://twitter.com/Kickastina Kristina

    My top three recommended resources would be, in no particular order, Anki (both), Japanese
    The Manga Way, and TextFugu. ^^

    Anki is a great tool for any learning practice. It works as a customizable flash cards. The one hooked up to your computer can easily synch with the one on your phone, making it an AWESOME study tool on the go. Whether you are commuting for just a few minutes (not driving of course- that’s a no-no!) or waiting in a four hour line to see a midnight premiere of your favorite movie that’s been sold out, it is terrific for reiterating vocabulary, grammar, and formulas.

    My second resource that is great would be Japanese The Manga Way. Although I haven’t had much experience with it, from what I have seen and heard it’s helpful, funny, and practical. It makes it easy to understand by using examples from manga/anime and then doing a further explanation.

    TextFugu is one that I am much WANTING to join in on, but do not quite have the funds yet for. However, I have tried the first lessons and the way Kanji was being taught by radicals and mnemonics . The radical teaching system I thought was pretty useful in remembering in the long-term run. The mnemonics helped to remember by really sticking-out key information in odd, quirky connections. It made it remember it more vivid and longer.

    (Email- Kickastina93@gmail.com)

  • http://twitter.com/Kickastina Kristina

    My top three recommended resources would be, in no particular order, Anki (both), Japanese
    The Manga Way, and TextFugu. ^^

    Anki is a great tool for any learning practice. It works as a customizable flash cards. The one hooked up to your computer can easily synch with the one on your phone, making it an AWESOME study tool on the go. Whether you are commuting for just a few minutes (not driving of course- that’s a no-no!) or waiting in a four hour line to see a midnight premiere of your favorite movie that’s been sold out, it is terrific for reiterating vocabulary, grammar, and formulas.

    My second resource that is great would be Japanese The Manga Way. Although I haven’t had much experience with it, from what I have seen and heard it’s helpful, funny, and practical. It makes it easy to understand by using examples from manga/anime and then doing a further explanation.

    TextFugu is one that I am much WANTING to join in on, but do not quite have the funds yet for. However, I have tried the first lessons and the way Kanji was being taught by radicals and mnemonics . The radical teaching system I thought was pretty useful in remembering in the long-term run. The mnemonics helped to remember by really sticking-out key information in odd, quirky connections. It made it remember it more vivid and longer.

    (Email- Kickastina93@gmail.com)

  • B. Biscuit

    I personally liked Tae Kim’s Guide when I first started learning Japanese. I felt like everything was explained in a way that made sense. The examples he uses are totally random and give a little smirk every time I read them. Rikaichan is also extremely helpful. 

    (Intermediate Learner!!)

  • bduddy

    Wait… can you see our e-mails? Just to be sure, mine is bduddy55555@gmail.com

  • Scott Bates

    I recommend Japanese for busy people; it’s a great text book for starting out your Japanese adventure, the grammar is aimed at businesses but it helps improve spoken Japanese with the addition of a CD!
    Also Textfugu looks great!! It was worth a try :)

  • Anonymous

    I picked Denshi Jisho and Rikaichan. And the following are the reasons for each one:

    1. Denshi Jisho

    A web-based dictionary using JEdict which can save your life when you are studying with a textbook but need to know the writing form of a word or the usage in sentences while you’re in front of a computer – that is awesome – and it also has a mobile site.

    2. Rikaichan

    A little and light add-on for Firefox that definitely saves my life when I’m trying to read pages like Newtype and Dengeki ones (and often, a newspaper site). It shows to the user the word, and if you press a button (I think it’s ctrl) it also shows the kanji usage in names, places and info for that kanji alone (e.g. the number of the kanji in some books and dictionaries, radical info, meaning and frequency)

    And there’s a site which I started using some time ago, called “JLPT Study page” (http://www.jlptstudy.com) that is really useful if you’re trying to study for JLPT N5~N2 or just review vocabulary, particles and use of verbs.

  • Snapcasezx3

    I really like Japanese the Manga way.  My main motivation for learning Japanese is to read Manga in Japanese.  This book was made for me.  It directly gets me closer to my goal.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=38708642 Amani Pitts

    Totally recommended Textfugu after years of searching for a Japanese Learning source that suited by way of thinking

    Gakuu- although still a beginner I use this site to force myself into language immersion and translating parts of the articles for study

    And PLEASE people use all of the cheat sheets, they are so wonderful for my brain on the train and when I start to stumble on some of the very elementary things in my learning

    If my friends find this though I am so dead because they are tired of me talking about this great site and all the things I learn from using the multiple resources suggested, except the one friend I got addicted to using these resources to learn herself

  • AvidReader

    heyhey!- I recommended Lang-8, I found this site to be extremely helpful, and user friendly… basically I fell in love with the whole concept- honing skills in reading, writing and sentence structure. With this TRIFECTA of AWESOME! it becomes almost impossible to say no! The number one thing that sold me to recommend this was the fact that ANYONE can use it for ANY LANGUAGE! seriously, I used this for Spanish/ Japanese (of course ;D) my sister could use this for Mandarin, my brother for Italian or my friend with French… there really isnt a loosing side here! – and this is SO much better then any of those video-chat based website, that claim to be “language learning  based” – (lets face it… thing can get REAL AWKWARD.. REAL FAST over a web cam… O.o) 

  • Fishy Chips

    Let me also add, I have a small Oxford Mini Japanese Dictionary. ABSOLUTELY GREAT! All the Japanese are in… Japanese. Kanji with Kana Syllabary. There are explanations on many things that don’t translate right, and even a phrasebook and section on many different things. The only problem is sometimes looking up a word, its not there. That is usually meaning that it is a vulgarity, or you are looking up a word which is not British English. :P

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1557601331 Tanner Lambson

    I use Lang-8 every day (I mean, that’s sort of the point isn’t it…?). I really love the people aspect. It’s extremely useful for learning everyday Japanese. Like people speak. In real life. I recommend it for everyone. Beginners, intermediate, and advanced can all use it and reap it’s usefulness.

    I also recommended Textfugu. I don’t have an account, but I love the free portion. It’s already helping. Also…Denshi Jisho. It’s amazing. ‘Nuff said.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1557601331 Tanner Lambson

    Did I mention I’m an intermediate student…?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1503326602 Michael Jap

    As beginner learner, I recommend:

    ++NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet++
    It is very useful for beginner, because there are Hiragana & Katakana charts and  important “cautions” messages. Also, there is romaji version for people that not memorized hiragana yet.
    Actually I like this cheat sheet because it is include a lot things that important in just 2 pages.

    ++ TextFugu’s Hiragana Chart &  TextFugu’s Katakana Chart
    It is very clear charts. It is simple and includes dakuten and combos. It is beginner’s best friend.

    As beginner I really like cheat sheets rather than in computer, because it is printable and offline. Since there a lot temptation in computer that disturb my study. Cheat sheets have limited information but it is contain basic things which important.

    [michaeljap88@gmail.com]

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1503326602 Michael Jap

    As beginner learner, I recommend:

    ++NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet++
    It is very useful for beginner, because there are Hiragana & Katakana charts and  important “cautions” messages. Also, there is romaji version for people that not memorized hiragana yet.
    Actually I like this cheat sheet because it is include a lot things that important in just 2 pages.

    ++ TextFugu’s Hiragana Chart &  TextFugu’s Katakana Chart
    It is very clear charts. It is simple and includes dakuten and combos. It is beginner’s best friend.

    As beginner I really like cheat sheets rather than in computer, because it is printable and offline. Since there a lot temptation in computer that disturb my study. Cheat sheets have limited information but it is contain basic things which important.

    [michaeljap88@gmail.com]

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1503326602 Michael Jap

    As beginner learner, I recommend:

    ++NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet++
    It is very useful for beginner, because there are Hiragana & Katakana charts and  important “cautions” messages. Also, there is romaji version for people that not memorized hiragana yet.
    Actually I like this cheat sheet because it is include a lot things that important in just 2 pages.

    ++ TextFugu’s Hiragana Chart &  TextFugu’s Katakana Chart
    It is very clear charts. It is simple and includes dakuten and combos. It is beginner’s best friend.

    As beginner I really like cheat sheets rather than in computer, because it is printable and offline. Since there a lot temptation in computer that disturb my study. Cheat sheets have limited information but it is contain basic things which important.

    [michaeljap88@gmail.com]

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1503326602 Michael Jap

    As beginner learner, I recommend:

    ++NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet++
    It is very useful for beginner, because there are Hiragana & Katakana charts and  important “cautions” messages. Also, there is romaji version for people that not memorized hiragana yet.
    Actually I like this cheat sheet because it is include a lot things that important in just 2 pages.

    ++ TextFugu’s Hiragana Chart &  TextFugu’s Katakana Chart
    It is very clear charts. It is simple and includes dakuten and combos. It is beginner’s best friend.

    As beginner I really like cheat sheets rather than in computer, because it is printable and offline. Since there a lot temptation in computer that disturb my study. Cheat sheets have limited information but it is contain basic things which important.

    [michaeljap88@gmail.com]

  • Richard Hebert

    Textfugu because it changed my life. May sound stupid, but after so many failed attempts at trying to study it was the first time that it ever actually has worked, now I am modeling the rest of my life around what I am learning.

    Anki, because it takes so much stress off of what to study on a daily review, makes the world of difference!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1503326602 Michael Jap

    As beginner learner, I recommend:

    ++NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet++
    It is very useful for beginner, because there are Hiragana & Katakana charts and  important “cautions” messages. Also, there is romaji version for people that not memorized hiragana yet.
    Actually I like this cheat sheet because it is include a lot things that important in just 2 pages.

    ++ TextFugu’s Hiragana Chart &  TextFugu’s Katakana Chart
    It is very clear charts. It is simple and includes dakuten and combos. It is beginner’s best friend.

    As beginner I really like cheat sheets rather than in computer, because it is printable and offline. Since there a lot temptation in computer that disturb my study. Cheat sheets have limited information but it is contain basic things which is important.

    [michaeljap88@gmail.com]

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1503326602 Michael Jap

    As beginner learner, I recommend:

    ++NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet++
    It is very useful for beginner, because there are Hiragana & Katakana charts and  important “cautions” messages. Also, there is romaji version for people that not memorized hiragana yet.
    Actually I like this cheat sheet because it is include a lot things that important in just 2 pages.

    ++ TextFugu’s Hiragana Chart &  TextFugu’s Katakana Chart
    It is very clear charts. It is simple and includes dakuten and combos. It is beginner’s best friend.

    As beginner I really like cheat sheets rather than in computer, because it is printable and offline. Since there a lot temptation in computer that disturb my study. Cheat sheets have limited information but it is contain basic things which is important.

    [michaeljap88@gmail.com]

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1503326602 Michael Jap

    As beginner learner, I recommend:

    ++NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet++
    It is very useful for beginner, because there are Hiragana & Katakana charts and  important “cautions” messages. Also, there is romaji version for people that not memorized hiragana yet.
    Actually I like this cheat sheet because it is include a lot things that important in just 2 pages.

    ++ TextFugu’s Hiragana Chart &  TextFugu’s Katakana Chart
    It is very clear charts. It is simple and includes dakuten and combos. It is beginner’s best friend.

    As beginner I really like cheat sheets rather than in computer, because it is printable and offline. Since there a lot temptation in computer that disturb my study. Cheat sheets have limited information but it is contain basic things which is important.

    [michaeljap88@gmail.com]

  • Jennifer H

    I recommended Remembering the Kanji, Anki, Jisho.org, and Rikaichan. 

    Remembering the Kanji and Anki have gotten me so far in my studies. Even though I’m at around an intermediate level, kanji has always been an issue for me, but with Heisig’s method I’ve been able to learn 1556 kanji within less than two months! Huge progress, I’d say :)

    Anki is also invaluable for not just remembering kanji, but for learning vocab words and helping reinforce grammar. I definitely plan on using this for a long time to come.

    I do have an electronic dictionary, but a lot of times, Jisho.org is just more convenient. Looking up words and searching for kanji with radicals is super easy. I also like how it lists what number a kanji is in Remembering the Kanji.

    Rikaichan is so helpful for browsing Japanese websites and looking up unknown vocab. It’s a lot faster and more convenient than copying and pasting words into another online dictionary.

  • Jennifer H

    I recommended Remembering the Kanji, Anki, Jisho.org, and Rikaichan. 

    Remembering the Kanji and Anki have gotten me so far in my studies. Even though I’m at around an intermediate level, kanji has always been an issue for me, but with Heisig’s method I’ve been able to learn 1556 kanji within less than two months! Huge progress, I’d say :)

    Anki is also invaluable for not just remembering kanji, but for learning vocab words and helping reinforce grammar. I definitely plan on using this for a long time to come.

    I do have an electronic dictionary, but a lot of times, Jisho.org is just more convenient. Looking up words and searching for kanji with radicals is super easy. I also like how it lists what number a kanji is in Remembering the Kanji.

    Rikaichan is so helpful for browsing Japanese websites and looking up unknown vocab. It’s a lot faster and more convenient than copying and pasting words into another online dictionary.

  • Jennifer H

    I recommended Remembering the Kanji, Anki, Jisho.org, and Rikaichan. 

    Remembering the Kanji and Anki have gotten me so far in my studies. Even though I’m at around an intermediate level, kanji has always been an issue for me, but with Heisig’s method I’ve been able to learn 1556 kanji within less than two months! Huge progress, I’d say :)

    Anki is also invaluable for not just remembering kanji, but for learning vocab words and helping reinforce grammar. I definitely plan on using this for a long time to come.

    I do have an electronic dictionary, but a lot of times, Jisho.org is just more convenient. Looking up words and searching for kanji with radicals is super easy. I also like how it lists what number a kanji is in Remembering the Kanji.

    Rikaichan is so helpful for browsing Japanese websites and looking up unknown vocab. It’s a lot faster and more convenient than copying and pasting words into another online dictionary.

  • Zac Citron

    Hey,

    I recommended Textfugu, Anki, RealKana, and I tried recommending Kodansha Kanji Learner’s

    Dictionary, but the damn button won’t work!

    Now for the juice:

    1) Textfugu: The hardest part about learning Japanese, for me and I think many others, is having a set path to follow. If someone throws a Kanji dictionary in your face, a Hiragana chart on the table and says “learn Japanese,” most people will freeze. The human mind likes to “follow directions” which Textfugu provides.

    Furthermore, since Textfugu already has a set path laid out for you, you can devote the mental energy that would have been required to build that path towards learning the damn language! Koichi makes sure you learn the important information first, as opposed to many standard approaches.

    Moreover, Textfugu is divided into highly manageable chunks. Most people, I believe, prefer smaller, digestable chunks rather than large amounts of information. This is why books have chapters and why Twitter is so popular. Quick, easy, and informative.

    Only have 5 minutes? That’s long enough to get through a paragraph or learning the next Kanji. Only have 2 minutes? Learn the next vocab word. Koichi manages to provide such divisible information that you can learn “how to count from 1 to 100,00″ or you can learn “1 to 10″ or you could learn “1” or you could just learn about the numbers themselves. Totally up to you.

    There are even vocab packs with vocal pronunciation for your assistance almost every chapter, a hugely helpful addition to an already outstanding package. I can’t express with words how helpful hearing the words spoken is.

    The major con of Textfugu is that it is tailored for a beginner. I hesitate even writing this, as
    someone may use this reason as an excuse not to adopt Textfugu. It’s not a good reason at all. I simply mean that, if you are familiar with Japanese, Textfugu is probably not going to be the most helpful source you could use. For someone who has not begun Japanese or is fresh to it, stop making excuses. Textfugu is your gateway into the magical world of Japanese.

    I want to add that, Koichi’s quotes of inspiration are great. At first you may find them cheesy or you may gloss over them, but they are truly a learning aid. Read every quote and read every line of motivation — you never know what might click.

    2) Anki: Simply put, Anki is free and probably the best note-card program available.

    In case you are confused, or failed to see the awesome in my previous statement, I’ll go on a bit.

    Anki provides you with the ability to import cards created by others (and create them if I’m not mistaken) including the ones used in Textfugu. In fact, I would consider Anki “mandatory” for a Textfugu user.

    You can choose the rate at which you remember words. For instance, I am very familiar with the word “Tomodachi” (friend) because my brother and I have an inside joke about it. Thus, when the card comes up, I can select to review it either immediately, or at different time intervals. With my example, I could select to only review “Tomodachi” every 5 days, 6 months, etc. For words you have trouble with, you can select to review them immediately, or every day, every two days, etc.

    Note: You can absolutely review your cards early. Anki does not prevent you from doing so.

    The last squeeze of awesome comes from the sound. Notecards can have sound accompany them, like vocab words. This is a priceless feature for a language learner. You can learn a language all you want through text, but hearing it and speaking it is a different game. I cannot stress enough how helpful this is.

    The major con is that, for me at least, it took a bit of time to figure out the controls. On the positive side, I never actually looked them up — after feeling around for a while you’ll get them. It ain’t difficult, it’s just not completely obvious.

    3) RealKana: This is the slickest, cleanest way to drill your kana. Simply choose what characters you’re interested in drilling and it’ll spin them your way over and over until your hands fall off. It’s use is straight forward and narrow, but it does the job damn well.

    Furthermore, my favorite thing about RealKana is the iPhone application. At $2.99 (not a bad price) you get the full program on your phone.

    Why is this great? Because it means that whenever you have 30 seconds to spare you could pop open the app and crunch through some kana. Waiting in line at Chipotle for a burrito? Tear open RealKana and truck through that hiragana you’re struggling with.

    The convenience of having a flash-card drilling program at your finger tips whenever you have
    downtime is crazy awesome.

    4) Kodansha Kanji Learner’s Dictionary: As far as Kanji dictionaries go, I’m not too much of an
    expert. I have a few things to say about this product.

    First, it’s sleek and sexy. I would call it the most attractive piece of Japanese learning equipment available.

    Second, it has an interesting look-up system. Unfortunately, I rarely use it and I didn’t spend the time learning how to use it either. I tend to just look in the back index — which is organized
    fabulously.

    Third, there is an insane amount of information for every Kanji. Warning: This is highly
    intimidating for a beginner.

    Overall, this is a great piece of reference material. I wouldn’t recommend you sit down and crunch Kanji straight out of this book as you’ll be learning a bit too much. Koichi stresses the 80-20 rule (learn the 20% of information that gets you 80% of the way) and this book doesn’t make the 20% clear. It gives you all 100% of the information, leaving the deducing up to yourself.

    However, for a perfectionist, this book is fantastic. You’ll learn everything you need to know about Kanji. No stone of information left unturned.

    I hope this helps!

  • Chad

    Koichi, you should definitely make a tumblr

  • Anonymous

    I recommend at least trying Textfugu. I’m only a few lessons in, but so far (I’m a freebie user right now), I really love it. Textfugu really shows you how you can start learning Japanese, instead of pondering HOW to learn Japanese, you can actually START learning Japanese.

    I also recommend RealKana. I have no idea how I would practice identifying kana without this website. 

    (email: tyler.ivers@gmail.com)

  • Yusefkalam

    I recommended TextFugu because if you really wanna start learning the Japanese language, even if it’s from scratch, this is a good place to start. yusefkalam@gmail.com

  • Yusefkalam

    I also recommend real kana because I used it to learn hiragana within a quick two week period.

  • Chris Hawkins

    Anki! The only thing that could make reviewing easier would be if Anki could read your mind, The only thing that could make creating cards easier would be if I could remember the hot-key to switch keyboards.

    Of course, TextFugu is the most powerful Japanese learning resource in the world! No, the universe! Created by no other than the Almighty Learning God, Koichi!(*kiss, kiss, grovel*)Seriously, even though I have only scratched the surface, a.k.a. free lessons, I can say that TextFugu is possibly the best at keeping my Japanese learning experience structured, informative, and most importantly entertaining.

  • http://twitter.com/mao_sama yuuki kuran

    I recomended NihongoUp since its one of the few resources that ive used in that list, It has a ipod/iphone ver. which is helpful to learn japanese whaile travelling, waiting for the bus etc, I especially like this one because it has the kanji, grammar, hiragana & katakana revisions all packed into one cool app. 

    Another one that I constantly use and recomend is the Rikaichan web browser extension, I LOVE this. I also LOVE to browse japanese web pages and read a lot of japanese blogs. this has helped me mostly in my kanji studies. while reading blogs or web pages many kanji’s or words that i dont understand, RikaiChan helps a lot. 

    I also recomend Tofugu’s Japanese particles cheatsheet. this was introduced by my college japanese professor and this cheat sheet is simply AWESOME!!! it has helped me soo much in using the particles and understanding them. definitely a must for any japanese languange learning beginner. 

    email: hachiko.nana.komatsu@gmail.com

  • http://haleyandhope.deviantart.com/ Haley

    Here are my recommendations for eight of Tofugu’s Japanese Language Resources. I ended up writing a lot, because I am really obsessed with all of these and can’t help but gush about them to my friends, even if they don’t understand Japanese! XD;;;

    JAPANESE TEXTBOOKS:
    1. Textfugu
    Shortly after I was started learning Japanese as a n00b a bit over a year ago, I found Textfugu. It has videos, free content, and study resource links to lovingly guide newbies in the right direction. As I read each page of this virtual textbook, I felt a spark of inspiration from Koichi’s entertaining explanations, use of motivational quotes, and study tips. I became determined to slowly become as good as him (XD;; ). Unfortunately, I finished the free content long ago (and am now consider myself intermediate level), but at least there’s still Tofugu.

    2. Tae Kim’s Guide to Learning Japanese
    This website is extremely, mind-blowingly in-depth about explaining how to use Japanese grammar in a super simple way. It explains each concept without flowery linguistic wording and uses charts so you can clearly understand conjugations. Then, there are quizzes after each chapter so it’s solid in your mind and builds up from there. You can hover your mouse over the vocab for its kanji, and since they’re repeated so much, you’re bound to remember them. It definitely teaches the foundations of Japanese, *especially* if you take notes in a Word document.

    JAPANESE LANGUAGE LEARNING WEBSITES & SOFTWARE:
    3. Lang-8
    Somehow, correcting the errors in other people’s entries has never been so much fun. XD It’s interesting and valuable to get to see the perspective of what Japanese users think about their English studies, differences between Japan and America (if they’re writing about being abroad), and what each user as a person enjoys doing every day. Writing my own journal entries in Japanese improved my confidence about what I’ve learned so far and let me know what I need to improve at; it helps me sort out sentence structure in my head.

    4. Rikaichan
    Rikaichan is super helpful and fast to use. Just hover your mouse over Japanese text and it’ll highlight each word and give its possible definitions in a pop-up. It’s a lifesaver when you’re looking at Japanese blogs and might not know when one word starts and another begins.

    5. ReadTheKanji
    This site uses virtual “flashcards” with Japanese sentences to test your knowledge of hiragana, katakana, and/or kanji (depending on your settings). It’s a quick way to find out how skilled you are, especially if you keep getting just about every flashcard wrong (lol). As you master each kanji, it gets color-coated depending on how well you know it compared to other kanji in a giant table. It’s helpful to write out the sentence and then the answer (if you got it wrong) in a notebook to study for next time you return to ReadTheKanji.

    6. NihongoUp
    An in-depth online textbook with charts, dialogs, blogs about obscure Japanese culture, and audio for almost every example sentence (and that’s just beginning to mention what free accounts get). I had the privilege of trying out one month of their “Learn” package for the price of the “Review” one due to the owners’ generosity (they are very fast at replying for customer service). Subscribers get to play their review games and get bonus quizzes and cheat-sheets (to name a few of their services). They even hold quite a few different types of contests for expensive Japanese-learning swag.

    JAPANESE WORKSHEETS/CHEATSHEETS
    7. Tofugu’s Japanese Particles Cheatsheet
    A helpful reference sheet that explains the most common particles, has examples, and can be memorized quickly. It’s the perfect size to tape in the back of your “Nihongo notebook” that you read on the job when you should be working. ;D

    JAPANESE DICTIONARIES
    8. Denshi Jisho
    Denshi Jisho is my bff. There isn’t a day when I don’t use it to look up words. Even my sister, who can only read romaji uses it, because you can search or receive results in romaji or kana. When I’m challenging myself by trying to read Japanese manga and web comics, I use its “Kanji by radicals” feature to look up kanji I don’t know. You can even go from there and look up sentences and new vocabulary that contain said unknown kanji! It’s pretty much the “poor man’s electronic dictionary” if I do say so myself.

  • Gypsy

    I have just recently started self-learning after studying for four years in school. It was a hard transition, but with all the resources like Lang-8, LiveMocha, and Tofugu I have been able to get advise and help from others besides just my textbooks and dictionaries. It’s amazing how much an online community can help one grow! 

  • http://twitter.com/Forestofmagic Makoto Kikuchi

    I picked Textfugu. While I only have the monthly subscription for now, I like that it addresses the issue with the way native Japanese people learn Kanji. Instead of learning kanji that’s complicated to write, (yet easy to understand the meaning of) you start with ones that are bound to stick with you. This makes the whole process a lot less painful. (Email: scientiam.et.sapientiam@gmail.com)

  • wohdin

    Kotoba! – probably one of the best dictionary applications ever. Not just the best for phones, the best PERIOD. It’s so easy to use, and so feature rich, and is really well-maintained, and is pretty regularly being updated with new features. And – IT’S FREE. Seriously, if you own an iOS device and don’t have this, then why are you on this website?
    Anki – great new-age flashcard app that has an easily portable iOS version. It has a whole library of flashcard sets, not just for Japanese – but for a whole slew of subjects, not even limited to languages. Great for anyone who needs to study, well, anything, not just Japanese. But it’s definitely great for that too.
    Lang8 – it’s awesome to be able to be corrected on your Japanese by native Japanese speakers. As long as you can handle being corrected and can take constructive criticism, USE THIS SITE. Not only that, but you can feel good about helping others in the same way with their English.
    Forvo – I use this too, it’s a great tool for clarifying some of those Japanese word tone issues that may pop up from time to time, since virtually no Japanese resources actually teach them. I would have never figured out how to properly pronounce 雰囲気 if it weren’t for this site lol.

    Finally, one app that is NOT mentioned anywhere, and honestly in my opinion doesn’t get nearly enough recognition, is Wakan. It’s not that well known, probably because it’s not been maintained in a few years, but it’s still really feature rich and is a staple part of my Japanese learning. Basically it’s a Japanese text editor, that displays text in three sections per line: furigana, large-font Japanese text, and a “translation” (more specifically, the dictionary definition) beneath each word. Further, you can hover over any word or kanji and see more details about the dictionary entries. In terms of dictionary usage, you can lookup words and common set phrases both in English and Japanese romaji, and you can look up kanji with a great number of custom filters such as stroke count, radical composition and reading. You can even flag kanji and dictionary terms as learned. There are custom dictionaries available for names and places, scientific terminology, and even classical/Buddhist terms. It’s based on EDICT, but unfortunately it’s based on a really old version, meaning it’s not compatible with newer versions, so it’s a little outdated. Still, it’s got a whole lot of dictionary content. As a “bonus”, it also supports Mandarin Chinese with most of the same features.

    For it to be so poorly maintained and, at least with more modern versions of Windows, pretty buggy, it’s one of the most complete Japanese assistant programs I’ve ever used. I just wish it was still being developed.

  • Hinoema

    I want one of the prizes to be a subscription to that Japanese Candy of the Month Club. 

    Srsly, this is cool. I don’t have facebook, but good luck to those who do. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000079188103 Martin Krošlák

    I recommended several of resources mentioned there (as I use pretty much all of them).

    Tae Kim’s guide, because it explains grammar in very good way.
    Anki, simply because it’s awesome (it really helps if you’re like me and hate seeing those blue numbers saying how many cards are due today and want to go through them all :) ).
    RealKana helped me a lot back when I was just starting and didn’t know kana so well.
    I’m using Rikaichan a lot since I’m not so well versed in kanji yet, but I have  bad habit of just looking at the meaning, ignoring readings altogether. :(
    All the cheatsheets mentioned there are great (although I really don’t like the “cheat” part of their name  :) ).
    Denshi Jisho simply because it’s much more user friendly version of Jim Breen (imo at least).

  • Chris Dame

    This is an amazing resource, and I’m happy to say I’ve used most of them. You’ve definitely picked good ones. I’ve done some recommending, and am looking forward to at least the noun pack. Here’s hoping I win more!

  • Shannon

    Textfugu helped headstart my Japanese education before I start my minor in college.  And Anki is the best way to memorize things, for sure.

  • Kairi Izumi

    TextFugu: It’s really human, and guides you through everything without leaving you feel lost and overwhelmed. Koichi’s way of teaching Kanji really works wonderfully.
    Anki: Not a lot to be said about Anki. Sure, drilling isn’t fun, but it does work. 20 minutes reviewing on Anki a day really helps get that Kanji vocabulary into your head.
    Denshi Jisho: Again, not much to say (it’s a dictionary!). I found it especially useful in looking up Kanji characters that I hadn’t yet come across.

    (email: ibutsu@me.com)

  • Eleanor Chandler

    Japanese at uni, let’s start!

    It seemed like a chance to stand apart,

    But study after class seemed so baffling,

    Each stroke I forgot left a sting,

    The passion I once had did depart,

     

    But like a shining beacon Tofugu came,

    Bearing gifts to lift my game,

     

    The night before the essay was due,

    My friends at Lang8 knew what to do,

     

    Tofugu’s cheatsheet untangled the web

    Of those fuzzy particles は, がand へ、

     

    Denshi Jisho and Rikaichan created online
    ease,

    When unfamiliar words came to tease,

     

    But no connection was no complication,

    Kotoba was more than just translation,

     

    So, here’s to Koichi and the crew,

    Thanks for a great point of view,

    I’m proof you can recommit,

    Let’s all jfdi,

    (Next, I hope to try Textfugu! )

     

  • Eleanor Chandler

    Japanese at uni, let’s start!

    It seemed like a chance to stand apart,

    But study after class seemed so baffling,

    Each stroke I forgot left a sting,

    The passion I once had did depart,

     

    But like a shining beacon Tofugu came,

    Bearing gifts to lift my game,

     

    The night before the essay was due,

    My friends at Lang8 knew what to do,

     

    Tofugu’s cheatsheet untangled the web

    Of those fuzzy particles は, がand へ、

     

    Denshi Jisho and Rikaichan created online
    ease,

    When unfamiliar words came to tease,

     

    But no connection was no complication,

    Kotoba was more than just translation,

     

    So, here’s to Koichi and the crew,

    Thanks for a great point of view,

    I’m proof you can recommit,

    Let’s all jfdi,

    (Next, I hope to try Textfugu! )

     

  • Der Cuben

    I recommended Denshi Jisho and Remembering the Kanji because, between those two and Surusu, I’m having no problem getting through the Kanji at my own (admittedly slow) pace.  RTK especially is awesome!

  • tetsumikado

    Heisig’s Guide to Remebering the Kanji is the best!
    Definitely the fastest and best way to learn kanji, and is even better when used in combination with anki.  This wasn’t on the resources page (although it should be), but a site called “reviewing the kanji” is extremely helpful conquering difficult kanji in the Heisig method.

    Also love Tae Kim’s grammar guide…everything’s in there!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Tyrie-Adams/100000168055297 Tyrie Adams

    Haiku time!

    I recommend two
    Love Anki and Genki 1
    Great for learning stuff

    I used Genki 1 last semester in my Japanese class. It was very simple to use. Its even possible to teach yourself with this book. To help get the vocab down I used Smart.fm to study. I’d recommend that too but its not free anymore D: So now I use Anki. Not as great as Smart.fm, but it gets the job done for free ^_^

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Marion-Paz-Fuentes-Andrade/1346577234 Marion Paz Fuentes Andrade

    About Read the Kanji, I like how they designed this application. I was just surprise how easy and useful could be. In fact, I really learned (and remembered) those kanji I was study for. Enter to this website was like enter to Charlie and the chocolat factory: Colors for your strongest and weakest point, customizing about the quiz and the kanji pup-up to look about the reading form and specifical detail about the word.
    Just the best awesomeness kanji website.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Marion-Paz-Fuentes-Andrade/1346577234 Marion Paz Fuentes Andrade

    About Read the Kanji, I like how they designed this application. I was just surprise how easy and useful could be. In fact, I really learned (and remembered) those kanji I was study for. Enter to this website was like enter to Charlie and the chocolat factory: Colors for your strongest and weakest point, customizing about the quiz and the kanji pup-up to look about the reading form and specifical detail about the word.
    Just the best awesomeness kanji website.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Marion-Paz-Fuentes-Andrade/1346577234 Marion Paz Fuentes Andrade

    About Read the Kanji, I like how they designed this application. I was just surprise how easy and useful could be. In fact, I really learned (and remembered) those kanji I was study for. Enter to this website was like enter to Charlie and the chocolat factory: Colors for your strongest and weakest point, customizing about the quiz and the kanji pup-up to look about the reading form and specifical detail about the word.
    Just the best awesomeness kanji website.

  • foozlesprite

    Tae Kim’s Guide to Learning Japanese-This is a great resource and reference for grammar.  Particles, conjugations, examples…Tae Kim’s has it all!  There’s a caveat to this one though; you’ll need some basic vocabulary and kanji to get through it, as the examples include kanji.  I’d recommend using it with the second resource I recommended, which is…

    Denshi Jisho!  This is an AMAZING dictionary site, and also an amazing place to look up kanji you don’t know.  There’s a page where you can click on any radicals in the kanji, and it will pop up all kanji which contain the specified radicals.  Jisho has a gargantuan vocabulary repository, and each word can be broken down by kanji (very helpful if you use mnemonics).  There are example sentences galore, and you can even restrict your search to commonly used words only.  You can input English, kana, romaji, or kanji, which makes it perfect even if you don’t have an IME installed.

    Japanese the Manga Way-This isn’t a comprehensive grammar resource by any means, but what it covers, it covers very well.  It’s exciting to see a grammar primer using examples from manga and breaking it all down both literally and figuratively so you can get a glimpse at the inner workings of the language, and how to THINK in the language.  The variety of characters used is large, so you get examples of how all sorts of people might talk and use grammar.

    Anki-I have nothing to say but positive things.  I’ve used Anki about half a year now, and it lets you enter whatever you want, however you want it.  If you want pictures, audio, sound, video…it does it all.  The best thing about Anki is that there are many vocabulary lists already out there.  I currently use the old Smart.fm lists from before Smart.fm became a pay service.  Spaced repetition really helps reinforce vocabulary.  Just don’t cheat and say you know something when you don’t!

    Skritter-I learned about Skritter via Tofugu, and bought myself a $60 tablet to try the trial.  It was worth every penny, and it’s worth the $10-a-month fee as well (you don’t find many college students willing to shell out a subscription fee to ANYTHING, so listen to me here).  It’s the perfect solution for rote kanji memorization, that adds fun to the rote.  You can add kanji/vocabulary in any order you like, so it could even act as a replacement for Anki. 

    The muscle memory helps out, there are tons of mnemonics on the site already, and you can add your own definition and mnemonic for anything.  You can use it in your browser or on your smartphone (if you’re lucky enough to own one).  A note here…my vocabulary has picked up 10x speed since I started learning kanji.  You may think they’re too much trouble, but most kanji compounds make SO MUCH SENSE, and I can even guess the meaning and reading of compounds I’ve never seen before.  It’s a thrill to see a kanji that I recognize.  Kanji and vocabulary feed into each other so much that it’s insane.  If you’re not learning kanji, you’re missing out!

    RealKana-If you’re not quite to the kanji stage, RealKana is where to start.  Pick a row of 5 kana.  Drill them before you go to bed in RealKana.  Do 5 kana a day, and you’ll know them all in no time.  Even if you don’t know what a word means, it feels amazing when you start looking at Japanese text and understanding what those kana squiggles mean!

  • Heather Ringer

    i recommend itks nice, even though i have only done the free bits, so see a socially/culturally relevant text book. it adds comfort when learning when the writing being done is just lax. itks not nearly as rigid as when learning from a standard text book. plus itks ensuringthe quality and* quantity that you lean. .. lus what text book has a name as “text fugu” fo thewin.   …only thing  have to say i please get a more mobile friendly commenting system!.. it took 4 attempts of rewwriting this whole comment to get it to actually post. *cry(. also pardon the typos. obile wont let me go back and ediit. :(

  • Heather Ringer

    i recommend itks nice, even though i have only done the free bits, so see a socially/culturally relevant text book. it adds comfort when learning when the writing being done is just lax. itks not nearly as rigid as when learning from a standard text book. plus itks ensuringthe quality and* quantity that you lean. .. lus what text book has a name as “text fugu” fo thewin.   …only thing  have to say i please get a more mobile friendly commenting system!.. it took 4 attempts of rewwriting this whole comment to get it to actually post. *cry(. also pardon the typos. obile wont let me go back and ediit. :(

  • Anonymous

    First of all, I recommend “Textfugu” – along with Textfugu’s Hiragana & Katakana Charts – because that is where I began my Japanese studies. I am glad that was my starting point because it gave me a terrific foundation which completely opened me up to this beautiful and interesting language! I have recommended Textfugu to many people, specifically people who want to learn Japanese but haven’t started yet, and people who just began learning Japanese. 

    Next to that, I recommend “Tae Kim’s Guide to Learning Japanese”, specifically the “Grammar Guide” because this where I turned once I had finished all the Textfugu lessons available to me allowing me to continue to advance my Japanese much further. I continue to read Textfugu when a new lesson is available, but when I want to learn a new grammar I turn to Tae Kim. It has great explanations of very common and important grammar, but it also has explanations for pretty much every grammar point you will come across as well as lessons on slang which is necessary if you want to understand Japanese shows, movies, music, and if you want to communicate with and understand your future Japanese friends. 

    The next thing I would recommend is something I have been using since I began my studies, “Denshi Jisho”. I would not have gotten as far as am now without this Online Japanese Dictionary. One of my favourite things about this dictionary is that you can search up Kanji you don’t know anything about, and Kanji you can’t copy and paste, using Kanji Radicals. You don’t have to know any Kanji Radicals either because they have them all there for you. You just have to look at the Kanji and then select the pieces you can see. This is great for looking up Kanji from online Ads, pictures, videos and Kanji in print. 

    After that I recommend “Gakuu”. I have only been using Gakuu since the start of July, but I already love it. If you are Intermediate or Advanced and want to up your skills to the next level, or practice your skills, Gakuu is the place to go. It uses Native Content to teach you uncommon grammar, great vocabulary and slang. It gives you a taste of the things you will see everyday in Japan. Whenever I want to spice up my studies, challenge myself, or gauge my progress I turn to Native content, and with Gakuu they do a lot of the hard work for you. So all you have to do is learn and practice. And you will never feel lost, because if you have a question, all you have to do is ask in a comment or e-mail the ones behind Gakuu and your question will be answered. 

    The next resources I recommend are great supplements to your studies. I have used them to aid and expand the possibilities of my studies. These resources are Anki, Lang-8, and Rhinospike. The first SRS I used was Smart.fm and it was great, so I never had a need for Anki, But since it began going downhill I started using it less and less. And then it became a paid service. Once that happened I needed a new SRS and so I immediately took the plunge into Anki. I haven’t looked back since. I love Anki because it is easy to use. You can study decks other people have made or easily make your own, and it doesn’t take long to learn everything there is to know about Anki. I also love that you don’t have to connect to the internet to use it. Which means you have no excuse not to study. I have been using Lang-8 since I began Season 3 of Textfugu – about a year ago. It is great for getting feedback on your studies, and it has a terrific community. I have learned how to properly use many grammar points which I thought I was using correctly. So, even if your writing is amazing, you will probably learn something new by using Lang-8. Next is Rhinospike. Rhinospike is a fairly new resource which means it probably has  long way to go, but I already love Rhinospike and I think it an amazing addition to your resources no matter how premature it is. What I love about Rhinospike is the ability to download the recordings people have made for you. This is great for practicing your listening skills. I don’t think it is good for content you have made, unless you are pretty advanced, but it is terrific for getting recordings of native content – especially since it is fast, accurate and free! I use it to get recordings of Japanese news articles, which I then download and put on my music listening device. It is great for Shadowing!

    The last thing I recommend is “NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet”. This is a great resource to have since it has an overview of very important grammar. So, you can use it if you need a refresher on some grammar or to give you a head start on grammar you don’t know so you can recognize that grammar and then find more in-depth explanations  on it – like in Tae Kim’s Japanese Grammar Guide. I like to use it to practice my Japanese while I am on the Train, at school, or just when I am away from my computer or any other Japanese resource. It is one page so it is very convenient!

    I hope these resources can help you as much as they help me!

  • Anonymous

    Sent you guys an e-mail with my E-mail address, since I used Disqus to comment.

  • http://twigwriters.com/forum Kumori Lawliet

    I recommended Kotoba because there’s nothing like a friendly little dictionary that fits in your pocket, especially when it speaks the same language that your favorite anime characters do. It’s just one of the best resources I’ve found, and I don’t know what I’d do without it. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Krista-Lee/507608697 Krista Lee

    Aniki – especially the mobile app. I practice my decks everywhere and at any opportunity, on the bus, waiting for appointments, when my friends are boring, before a movie starts, anywhere – and it’s all so handy on my iphone. Aniki keeps track of which cards you do well on and then nags at you until you have them down. It’s really helped me with vocab, verbs and kanji

    (krista_mitchell@live.com)

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Krista-Lee/507608697 Krista Lee

    Aniki – especially the mobile app. I practice my decks everywhere and at any opportunity, on the bus, waiting for appointments, when my friends are boring, before a movie starts, anywhere – and it’s all so handy on my iphone. Aniki keeps track of which cards you do well on and then nags at you until you have them down. It’s really helped me with vocab, verbs and kanji

    (krista_mitchell@live.com)

  • http://www.tofugu.com/ Hashi

    I wish there were more comments in limerick form. This is awesome! :D

  • http://www.facebook.com/Lawnmower16 Daniel Fawson

    I couldn’t agree more with what you have to say about Skritter. It makes all the new vocabulary make sense, so you can remember it really easily, and you start to get a feel for how to read kanji, even without having seen them before, just based on the radicals. I’m sad to see how few people are using this amazing tool.

  • Richard

    I recommended Tae Kim’s, Anki, Anki for Android, RealKana (lol…I used that back in the day!), Ultimate Adjectives (The description made me really REALLY want it!), and Rikaichan (or Rikaikun in Chrome).

    Why? Well all, except Ultimate Adjectives, are free! I would love if some of my friends started learning Japanese! It would definitely make me want to study more! :D

    I would have surely recommended TextFugu, but I haven’t tried it. :( I mean, I’ve seen the free lessons, but what I’m dying to see are the members only pages. 0.0

  • Anthony Shoulta

    I definitely reccommend Lang-8, especially for anyone who’s self-studying. It’s easy to misunderstand a lot of resources if you don’t have an experienced teacher, and practicing your grammar and vocab in a supportive environment full of native speakers is a great way to hone your Japanese skills.

  • http://www.tofugu.com/ Hashi

    Wellll we can probably bend the rules for you if you write some recommendations for us here in the comments :)

  • http://www.tofugu.com/ Hashi

    Between this comment and your internship application, I can tell that you are quite the poet :p

  • Thompson

    The Japanese particle cheat sheet is simply awesome, figuring out your ‘ga’s from your ‘wa’s is vital!

  • Thompson

    The Japanese particle cheat sheet is simply awesome, figuring out your ‘ga’s from your ‘wa’s is vital!

  • RsKari

    Actually my favorite source to learning Japanese is watching Japanese drama and movies! But since that’s not on the list…. 
    I recommend Lang-8 since it’s such a great idea to just write and be corrected to find out what  kind of mistakes you usually make. Since getting at the beginning of intermediate level I prefer trying to figure out the meaning of words by context but when that’s impossible I have kotoba, denshi jisho and rikaichan to help me! 

  • RsKari

    Actually my favorite source to learning Japanese is watching Japanese drama and movies! But since that’s not on the list…. 
    I recommend Lang-8 since it’s such a great idea to just write and be corrected to find out what  kind of mistakes you usually make. Since getting at the beginning of intermediate level I prefer trying to figure out the meaning of words by context but when that’s impossible I have kotoba, denshi jisho and rikaichan to help me! 

  • Ryan

    I really love Anki, Rikaichan, RTK, and lang-8.

    Anki because it’s an SRS (woot). I’d really recommend any SRS, they’re extremely useful. Learning vocab with Anki is often effortless. Combine this vocab bomb with rikaichan, and you’ve got yourself a 超強い vocab learning weapon.

    Rikaichan is amazing for unknown vocab. Don’t waste your time searching and searching through a dictionary, or even opening up a new tab to go to your favourite 英和辞書. All you have to do is hover the mouse over the word and BAM! The first time I used it my mind was bloooooown. Very useful.

    Lang-8. Great because native speakers correct you and you can correct learners of your language!

    Finally, Remembering the Kanji. Using Mneumonics and the order the Kanji are presented to you just make so much sense.  It’s the fastest I’ve ever learnt Kanji. Now, going through RTK old school is fine and dandy, but it can get quite a bit tedious creating a novel for each character. I really recommend the Lazy Kanji Kendo Mod. (link: http://www.alljapaneseallthetime.com/blog/the-lazy-kanji-kendo-mod ) It’s much more entertaining. But really, do whatever you want, RTK is awesome either way. Just don’t forget to use it with an SRS. Paper flashcards just don’t cut it nowadays.

    以上!

    (Although if I could, I’d recommend youtube. Lots of listening practice.)

  • ChibiKawaii1

    I recommend Anki because it is an amazing resource for learning Japanese.   Anki uses repetition for learned a new things so, you can practice what you don’t know more then words you already know.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mary-Sue/100002707573096 Mary Sue

    I recommend using  Rikaichan, I am at an intermediate level and I use it daily to help me read blogs. It allows me to highlight words so I can read them instantly it also gives me definitions of the words to help me, so I can build my vocabulary.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1576105710 Christine Cooney

    Sorry for my late submission. I’ve been suffering from a nasty head cold. They are not any easier to deal with in the summer. :(

    Note: I’m a beginner at Japanese. I took a year in college and that was over 10 yrs ago.
    Email: christine(at)cakuni(dot)com

    Recommendations:

    •    TextFugu
    First off you get to see some lessons for free. So you can try it out and see if it’s for you. Second it’s cheap. $20/month, $120/forever. (Which means you can put down $20 for one month and REALLY see if it’s for you or not.) Now I know for some people that isn’t cheap. However compared to other services out there, it’s a lot cheaper. I’ve have one experience with another company that wanted to charge more than I get on my two week paycheck. Umm. No.
    I believe in it so much that I got myself a membership for it. Now if life just slows down so I can USE it. :P (Just trust me when I say that I’ve had so much to deal with on my plate that I’ve been backlogged. I’m juuust getting through some of it now.)

    •    Japanese for Busy People
    I recommend this especially if you live in the state of Georgia. Why? The Japan-America Society of Georgia offers classes in Japanese and uses this textbook. See: http://jasgeorgia.org/eng/node/49 The classes are for 8 weeks and cost $200 for JASG members, $245 for non-members. However once as you enroll in their Japanese class they give you a year of membership to JASG. If you’ve missed a deadline to apply, just wait 8 weeks for the next opening.
    Also I’ve heard a lot of good things about this textbook from various sources. One negative review I read was that the book is for “serious students of the Japanese language.” If you’re reading this, that is exactly why you are here.
    Note: Comes in Romanized or a Kana version for volume I. (I’ve read II and III are in Japanese script.) There is also a workbook available as well.

    •    Read the Kanji
    Starting with your Hiragana or Katakana? Took it years ago but not sure how much you remember? This site is perfect for you. If you just know Hiragana and/or Katakana, you can use it FOR FREE!
    When you do start it, it’s good to know you ONLY have to translate the character written in red. I thought I had to translate the whole sentence when I started! If you’re using this on a smart phone or tablet and can’t find the red character, click Big-Kanji to see it.

    •    Almost recommend JapanesePod101
    Good if you want audio Japanese. Bad if you want email spam. Even after you buy a subscription, you’ll still get emails on discounts on.. subscriptions! Annoying, but that’s what email rules are for, right?

    Not on the list

    •    Kodansha’s Hiragana Workbook (ISBN10: 4-7700-3081-9 ISBN13: 978-4-7700-3081-8) & Kodansha’s Katakana Workbook (ISBN10: 4-7700-3082-7 ISBN13: 978-4-7700-3082-5)
    For the price it gives you some flashcards you can pull-out and use. Their website also has audio files that go with the books.
    Hiragana: http://www.kodansha-intl.com/9784770030818-audio/
    Katakana: http://www.kodansha-intl.com/9784770030825-audio/
    Cons: Kodanshi International has closed, so no new books will be published by them. They do plan to keep as many of their backlist titles in print as possible. So just in case I’d get these books sooner than later.
    Other con – The audio files can only be downloaded individually.

    •    Japanese Hiragana: An Introductory Japanese Language Workbook by Jim Gleeson (ISBN-10: 0804836205 ISBN-13: 978-0804836203
    Another Hiragana workbook?!? Yes another one. Why? Lots of practice blocks at the back of the book. Also it teaches you the Japanese version of English sounds, like a ticking clock or “glug, glug.” I think it’s cool to learn these things as you learn Hiragana.
    He’s written a katakana book too, but I don’t own it so I can’t say how it is.

    •    Hir@gana Times (aka Hiragana Times)
    You can buy this magazine from jbox.com. Just try one issue if you’re not sure if it’s for you. Articles are written in English and in Japanese. Any kanji has furigana above it to help you read it. It’s good for helping you to read both Hiragana and Katakana. One of the best ways to help you learn the kana is to read them. (The other is to write them, which I addressed in my above entries.) A few articles will actually break down each word in romaji, Japanese script, and English if you’re really a beginner, like me. :)

    Hope this helps you in your journey to learn Japanese!

    -Christine

  • Erin Franzen

    Genki is and has always been my favorite.  What’s really sweet about them is that volumes 1 & 2 follow the JLPT curricula to the kana.  Of course Anki anything also gets my recommendation, especially with its vast library of downloadable packs to save me the time of making my own cards.  Finally, jisho.org has always been my absolute go-to for my jisho-related needs.  One thing I really want from online dictionaries is “handwriting input”, like the java-based interface for my favorite Chinese dictionary http://www.mdbg.net/chindict/chindict.php .  Also, I am super pumped to G+ the crap out of this.  The world needs more G+.  Of the few friends I have on there, they include all of my Nihongo benkyoushiteiru tomodachitachi.  

  • Erin Franzen

    Genki is and has always been my favorite.  What’s really sweet about them is that volumes 1 & 2 follow the JLPT curricula to the kana.  Of course Anki anything also gets my recommendation, especially with its vast library of downloadable packs to save me the time of making my own cards.  Finally, jisho.org has always been my absolute go-to for my jisho-related needs.  One thing I really want from online dictionaries is “handwriting input”, like the java-based interface for my favorite Chinese dictionary http://www.mdbg.net/chindict/chindict.php .  Also, I am super pumped to G+ the crap out of this.  The world needs more G+.  Of the few friends I have on there, they include all of my Nihongo benkyoushiteiru tomodachitachi.  

  • Ma Riah

    I recommend…

    Remembering the Kanji by James W.Heisig, it was the first kanji book that I read and it has an interesting way of helping me to remember the kanji. I’m terrible with flash cards because I go in “no brain mode” and just know it when I see it on the card and not anywhere else! But this books help me go “okay, that has three lines, it doesn’t look like an eye but it does mean eye! Oh my god! I remember!”

    Rikaichan is my best friend. It’s the best way for me to learn strange and crazy looking kanji. It helps me read Hideo Kojima tweets (he posts like 50 times a day). I use Rikaichan everyday, simply the best and coolest way to read Japanese text. 

    And lastly, Nihongo Up, mainly because that game is SO ADDICTING. I’ve been teaching my boyfriend hiragana. After I showed him the basics, I let him play the game a bit even though I wasn’t expecting too much from him. And he learned new kana characters. I was so proud. :,) It’s also a nice way to freshen up my kanji and katakana. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/matthew.r.egbert Matthew R Egbert

    I recommended Textfugu, Anki, Lang-8 and NihonStock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet.  

    I had been toying with learning Japanese for a while.  When I decided to get serious I thought for sure I was going to have to shell out a bunch of money and/or go to school.  I found Textfugu while searching and decided to give their free lessons a try.  I was impressed with how fun Textfugu made learning Japanese.  And when things are fun things get easier.   And  just over $100 seemed like a great price for me so I decided to do it.  At the time Textfugu was doing a promotion where they giving %110 of their proceeds to Japanese quake relief.  So win, win for me, donate and get Textfugu.   I am extremely pleased I did.  Fun, down to earth and comprehensive; what more could you ask for?  The 30-30, 90/10 concepts, (if you don’t know what these are you should) have even helped me out in other things I do.  Anki is a no brainer.  You need flash cards to learn a language and Anki is the best flash card program;  customization and all the free decks make it awesome.  Lang-8 is great for practicing Japanese since I am learning alone and don’t have others to practice with.  Lang-8 is also win/win due to the fact that not only are you getting help, but you can help others by correcting others in your language.  The NihonStock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet is another no brainer.  Free and tightly packed with tons of great info.   Hope this helps some people! :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=527595333 Jorge Govela

    I know you said that there are more resources to come, but one of my all time favorites (which I hope makes it on those “more” ) is iknow.jp, formerly smart.fm (and no longer free ). It’s still at a quite reasonable price and when used correctly, the amount of vocabulary you can learn is just amazing! At least from what I used it, it’s really only useful for vocabulary though, not as much grammar, but I like the way that for me it helped close the gap between beginner and intermediate, and then slowly to advanced.   
    You’re doing a really great job by creating these lists of resources Koichi, for all of us who have no choice but self-study (no japanese lessons anywhere where I live) , I think they will truly 役立つ!
    Thanks and keep up the good work! 

  • http://squiggleydot.blogspot.com kelsey

    I recommended a handful, so I’ll break them down.

    1. Japanese the Manga Way – I bought this when I was a complete beginner and didn’t actually start using it until I started my 3rd year of classes.  It’s great if you’ve already started learning the language and gives many good examples/explanations for the grammar points.  I always boast about how this book taught me how to quote things (using って・と言いました/思いました). I love reading this for new grammar points because it explains everything so well!

    2.  lang-8.com – I LOVE Lang-8.  I first checked it out when Koichi mentioned it in a video/post and I signed up right away.  I only started using it recently, though, but I love it a lot!  Native speakers will correct your mistakes and give suggestions or just comment on the things you post about.  I’ve made a few friends on there & we correct each others entries.  It’s a positive learning place.  I can’t recommend this one enough.

    3.  Anki – I can see why everyone loves this flashcard program.  I personally like that it remembers what I got correct/wrong and modifies what cards show up after that.  Flipping through paper flashcards gets really boring when you have to personally sort them into Correct – Incorrect piles.  Then you just go through the incorrect pile and…yeah, boring.

    4.  Rikaichan(MF)/Rikaikun(GC) – I feel like I’m cheating when I use this ;]  SO helpful for when I’m surfing Japanese sites and I stumble across kanji I have no idea how to read… I also used it when I received emails from my J-penpal.  Great for knowing words on-the-spot to get the gist of what’s being said.

    5.  Japanese particle cheatsheet – I wish I had one of these when I started Japanese.  This would have made learning so much easier!  Great reference for beginners and veterans alike.

    6.  DenshiJisho – My go-to online dictionary of choice.  I used to use WWWJDIC until I found DenshiJisho.  It gives good example sentences and word definitions when I need them.

    7.  Kodansha Kanji Learners Dictionary – I love the look-up method in this dictionary – breaking down a kanji has never been easier.I think it’s a fantastic kanji dictionary.  I love that it gives common compounds, stroke order, readings, etc etc.

  • http://twitter.com/SabilPerbawa Sabil Perbawa

    I recommend everything, except The Kodansha Kanji Learner’s Dictionary because the recommend button did not work in my chrome.

    Why?
    You see, the thing is, I mostly use My Japanese Coach  in Nintendo DS (the upper screen is broken though) to learn Japanese and I think that any Japanese Resources are fine to use since you Just have to F******watermelon******* Do It

  • Lena

    Genki I actually now has a new edition, released only a couple months ago :) Genki II has a new edition coming out soon too :D I met the author and he’s a really cool guy :)

    I really like the list of resources, but there’s not much on there if you want to advance beyond the elementary level. Also, a lot of the textbooks are really heavily English based. I’ve been learning Japanese from textbooks written in Japanese for a while now, and I find that it’s a whole lot more effective (but I’m at the advanced level now, so maybe it’s more effective once you move past the elementary level?). If you’re looking to add more textbooks for more advanced levels, I’d be more than happy to recommend some :D

  • http://twitter.com/nour_elshami Nour El Shami

    Recommendations:

    1. Textfugu: where do I start? It’s super easy, super comfy unlike all that complicated Sh..ehh..trashy resources I had been recommended in the Introductory Japanese language course I took..most important of all,  It has everything a beginner (like me) would need to know..all in one place..that’s so awesome, man! Thank You!

    2. Anki: haven’t tried it out yet honestly but I’m definitely gonna..It will really organize stuff..I thought I would have to memorize using the old, hard way (pencil + paper..add my awful handwriting= Vomit!) but now with Anki..NO WAY! or more likely NO VOMIT!

    3. RealKana: Keep it real! Simple Basics are what every beginner/Me really needs…

    4. Textfugu’s Free Katakana & Hiragana charts!!: dude..again..thank you!

    (nour_elshami@hotmail.com)
     

  • http://www.spurked.com Peter Joseph

    Ok well, my personal favourites would have to be Genki, Anki,
    “NihonShock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet and the conjugation cheat
    sheet. I originally started off with Genki and I’ve loved it because it
    moves out of using romanji early on. I dragged on trying to use english
    and it did slow me down on my reading speeds, but Genki forces you into
    using hirigana.

    Now for Anki, amazing! I used to write words down on paper and made
    physical flash cards which took a long time and a lot of paper till i
    was recommended anki; the most useful tool for remembering words.

    My biggest recommendation would have to go to ‘remembering the kana’
    which i don’t think is on your list. It goest step by step on how to
    easily remember hirigana and katakana and shows how they’re all us,
    stroke order etc.

    my email: peter[at]spurked.com

  • Zalikha

    I would like to recommend  “Japanese the Manga way”. My circle of friends and my family love manga so much but they don’t really into Japanese language as much as I am. Since I’m self-studying Japanese language, at times I get lonely. Japanese the Manga Way is full of pictures so I hope people will enjoy more (especially my friends) and they won’t get bored easily. Pictures can do lots of talking and they are also one of the things that make people easy to remember stuff.

  • Sighfun

    I recommend textfugu.  Out of all the times I’ve ever tried to learn Japanese, this is the longest I’ve stayed with it.  The teaching style presented in textfugu helps me to understand, where as other textbooks have often confused me.  Also, Anki is a great tool for reviews and drilling.

  • spotkhaki

    I really like Lang-8. It’s a pretty awesome way to learn how to write in another language, while having hundreds of people possibly reading my work (which may look like crap to them)! Helping others write in the language I know is also really fun, as I get to help others AND feel better for myself!

  • http://twitter.com/liliumalbum timba

    As many other people I would recommend Anki and Lang-8 as your study resource. You can use both of them to learn not only Japanese but any other language as well. They’re useful for people at every level.

    At Lang-8 you can practice your writing skills and get some knowledge about the idioms and slang terms from its native users. You can also make friends with people all over the world and while reading their posts you can develop your culture knowledge as well.

    On the other hand, thanks to Anki you can make your own “flashcards” without expending  trees (good point for eco-lovers) and which also helps you chose  on what you should focus more right now. And though its a computer program, you can create your own staff, depending on what you actually want to learn. (Another thing, it doesn’t take up so much space of your disc’s memory!)

    There’s also this textbook called TextFugu which instead of a text written in a boring-school way use a simple-modern language, and is full of motivating pages. Although I just glanced at the free part of it, it was full of useful info and advices (as for example the short stories to help remember the meaning and reading of each kanji).

    All of them can be a great help for all of us who didn’t have Japanese in their schools.
    Cheers!

  • http://tamakun.tumblr.com Tama-kun

    I liked the following three resources:

    – Remembering the Kanji by Mr Heisig:
    I never read through the whole book and I wouldn’t say any student is obliged to. It’s all about the concept! The preface is probably the most inspiring essay you can read when starting to study kanji. I can’t believe there are still students out there learning characters stroke by stroke, but there are. With Heisig’s impulse, you just look at an unknown kanji and in an instant you know how to write it without ever looking at it again – cause you just save an information like “STANDING on a TREE, WATCHING you” and that’s all the blocks you need for PARENTS.

    – Lang 8:
    The most logical way to learn a language (if it’s not a dead one like Latin… gosh, Latin!) is by actually USING it. And Lang 8 has dozens of natives just waiting to correct your efforts – for free! Okay, I always feel kinda sad when these meanies mark half of my texts red and ask what the story was intended to be about. But that’s okay.

    – Kim Tae’s Guide:
    Thanks to the astonishing powers of the Internet, there is a grammar guide out there that’s completely free and surpasses every commercial text-book that’s trying so hard. Even in the basic chapters I learned some new stuff between the lines that conventional guides just forget to teach you. It’s reasonable to sacrifice some printer cartridges for this one. Environment will forgive you.

  • http://www.tofugu.com/ Hashi

    Great, thank you for all of the recommendations! btw, did you get the stickers we sent you?

  • http://www.tofugu.com/ Hashi

    Oh cool, I had no idea that Genki put out a new edition. How did you meet the author?

  • Anonymous

    I love anki for any language but it has some really helpful plug-ins for learning  Japanese, like Yomichan for reading Japanese text with rikaichan like dictionary and the ability to add word and phrases right to your anki deck and Audio Download for getting audio for the new words you discover

  • Anonymous

    I love anki for any language but it has some really helpful plug-ins for learning  Japanese, like Yomichan for reading Japanese text with rikaichan like dictionary and the ability to add word and phrases right to your anki deck and Audio Download for getting audio for the new words you discover

  • http://www.facebook.com/Angel.Valis Sean Douglas

    I recommended Genki I (and I recommend II as well) because it’s the textbook that I’ve been using since I started seriously learning Japanese. It has its faults, but I can’t say that I haven’t found faults in all the textbooks I’ve looked through; at the very least, Genki stops using romaji after the first 3 or so lessons, unlike some textbooks I’ve seen. 

    Rikaichan is another great resource which I was introduced to during my class, “Japanese for International Trade”. We were allowed to use it to help translate difficult words and phrases (which is pretty much all business-level Japanese), and it was a lifesaver on the exams. The only problem with it is that it’s a Firefox plugin, so if you don’t use Firefox, it’s a bit less convenient (I think there may be a Chrome version, but I think it’s not quite as complete).

    Finally, I definitely have to recommend the Kodansha (haha spelling suggestion: Kodachrome. Now I want to listen to some Paul Simon.) Learner’s Dictionary. I personally love kanji and this is a great resource to help you look up kanji that you don’t know. It gives example words and phrases, multiple readings and meanings and even lists other kanji which may be confused with it either visually or audibly. As long as you can count the number of strokes in kanji, and can learn the four basic constructions (left-right, top-bottom, enclosure and solid), it’s really easy to find what you’re looking for. There’re even several appendices (no, not appendixes, that refers to the organ that does nothing…though if I remember correctly, the dictionary uses the wrong word haha) which give you even more ways to look up words such as by readings.

  • Anonymous

    I recommended:

    1) Remembering the Kanji: I particularly like the way Heisig grouped multiple kanji together based on their primitives and revealed them in an orderly fashion. Some of the little stories that go along with each character are a little obscure, but that’s where “Reviewing the Kanji” (http://kanji.koohii.com/) comes in handy. If a character’s story doesn’t sit well in your memory, then you can use this site to find more memorable stories written by other people, or even post your own ideas to help others remember kanji.

     2) Lang-8: Not only does this let native speaker’s correct your work so you can sound like a normal, non-textbooky person, but it has other benefits too. It’s fun to correct journals   written in English by native Japanese people because it often reveals little insights about the culture and everyday life. Also, many Japanese will write Japanese translations next to the English sentences in their journals to clarify what they are trying to say, also helping you improve your Japanese. Also, like any journal, it can give you motivation to write daily (or more often than you normally would). Lang-8 packs a lot of win.

    ashleyloureiro@gmail.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1683981757 Josh Thorsen

    I recommend Anki. Besides the amazing card sets one can find for pretty much anything (even things that aren’t Japanese! WHAAT?) One of the biggest issues with learning Japanese is CONSISTENCY! And just knowing there’s a little program waiting to remind you a review is due can help get you on track with all those OTHER activities you use to learn. Saweet! 

    One resource that I didn’t see here – gasp! – that I’d like to shamefully promote is Voice Daily (VoiceDaily.com). I found it for ~~*FREE*~~ from Google Chrome’s appstore while looking for Japanese related things. You all use Chrome, right? Right? Anyway, Voice Daily has news radio programs from a bunch of different countries in a bunch of different languages. Although for some reason Japan Broadcasting is at the bottom of their link list. Here’s why you need to use it: 

    – Beginners (That’s me:) Passive listening to a native speaker of the language, but guess what! It’s generally slow and clear enough that you can actually process the sounds, even if you don’t know your vocab. I haven’t tried dictating in hiragana yet, but I probably could. Awesome!

    – Intermediate / Advanced Learners (that’s NOT me, yet:) This is a real live news broadcast, so aside from keeping your finger on the pulse of real things that are actually happening overseas, you’ll be hearing a large variety of different grammatical structures on a whole lot of different subjects. That’s pretty cool, huh? 

    Anyway, that’s my two cents. Now go learn something! Go! GO! ^^
    EDIT: email me at becomethefuture@gmail.com if you want to give me a prize. If you don’t, I won’t hate you. =)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1683981757 Josh Thorsen

    I recommend Anki. Besides the amazing card sets one can find for pretty much anything (even things that aren’t Japanese! WHAAT?) One of the biggest issues with learning Japanese is CONSISTENCY! And just knowing there’s a little program waiting to remind you a review is due can help get you on track with all those OTHER activities you use to learn. Saweet! 

    One resource that I didn’t see here – gasp! – that I’d like to shamefully promote is Voice Daily (VoiceDaily.com). I found it for ~~*FREE*~~ from Google Chrome’s appstore while looking for Japanese related things. You all use Chrome, right? Right? Anyway, Voice Daily has news radio programs from a bunch of different countries in a bunch of different languages. Although for some reason Japan Broadcasting is at the bottom of their link list. Here’s why you need to use it: 

    – Beginners (That’s me:) Passive listening to a native speaker of the language, but guess what! It’s generally slow and clear enough that you can actually process the sounds, even if you don’t know your vocab. I haven’t tried dictating in hiragana yet, but I probably could. Awesome!

    – Intermediate / Advanced Learners (that’s NOT me, yet:) This is a real live news broadcast, so aside from keeping your finger on the pulse of real things that are actually happening overseas, you’ll be hearing a large variety of different grammatical structures on a whole lot of different subjects. That’s pretty cool, huh? 

    Anyway, that’s my two cents. Now go learn something! Go! GO! ^^
    EDIT: email me at becomethefuture@gmail.com if you want to give me a prize. If you don’t, I won’t hate you. =)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1683981757 Josh Thorsen

    I recommend Anki. Besides the amazing card sets one can find for pretty much anything (even things that aren’t Japanese! WHAAT?) One of the biggest issues with learning Japanese is CONSISTENCY! And just knowing there’s a little program waiting to remind you a review is due can help get you on track with all those OTHER activities you use to learn. Saweet! 

    One resource that I didn’t see here – gasp! – that I’d like to shamefully promote is Voice Daily (VoiceDaily.com). I found it for ~~*FREE*~~ from Google Chrome’s appstore while looking for Japanese related things. You all use Chrome, right? Right? Anyway, Voice Daily has news radio programs from a bunch of different countries in a bunch of different languages. Although for some reason Japan Broadcasting is at the bottom of their link list. Here’s why you need to use it: 

    – Beginners (That’s me:) Passive listening to a native speaker of the language, but guess what! It’s generally slow and clear enough that you can actually process the sounds, even if you don’t know your vocab. I haven’t tried dictating in hiragana yet, but I probably could. Awesome!

    – Intermediate / Advanced Learners (that’s NOT me, yet:) This is a real live news broadcast, so aside from keeping your finger on the pulse of real things that are actually happening overseas, you’ll be hearing a large variety of different grammatical structures on a whole lot of different subjects. That’s pretty cool, huh? 

    Anyway, that’s my two cents. Now go learn something! Go! GO! ^^
    EDIT: email me at becomethefuture@gmail.com if you want to give me a prize. If you don’t, I won’t hate you. =)

  • Tina

    I recommended Skritter because I am one of those people who learn best by doing, and having to remember and write the different characters over and over again is really helpful to me.  :)  Also I love that it monitors how many characters you know how to write/read, it’s cool and motivational all at once.  I am actually using Rosetta Stone right now as my primary means of learning Japanese but the jury is still out on if I will recommend it or not, I think it is a good program but it needs to be supplemented by other thing as well.   For instance it is great about pronunciation but isn’t really so good about learning kanji which is why I ended up subscribing to skritter.  Am thinking about getting Tofugu as soon as I get paid, so maybe it will make it on my recommendations list as well, eventually!

  • http://twitter.com/SabilPerbawa Sabil Perbawa

    It ‘s either No or Not yet arrived, but thanks for all your effort in sending the stickers. :)

  • Tilly

    I recommended Genki since it’s what I’ve been using (mostly because I stole them from my brother’s room). The way they are written makes it easy for me to understand the content and master it. It’s basic. I also recommended NihongoUp since they have really nice cheatsheets.

  • Kristie:)

    Hello everyone!!!!!!!!!!! :) Here are the websites I recommend!!!!!!! The first website I recommend is…… Lang 8! I find this website very, very helpful for learning Japanese. I love this website because I can actually practice using Hiragana and Katakana. Japanese people can also check my work and make sure it is right. I also find it fun to help japanese and other people learn english too! :) The Second website I recommend is…… Real Kana I like this website because it actually quized me on my Hiragana and Katakana! I didn’t have to make flashcards or anything! I think this website is great for someone who is just starting out in Japanese.*Oh, and by the way…. A book that isn’t in the list of recommendations is Pict-O-Graphix by Michael Rowley. To people who are starting to learn Hiragana and Katakana this book is amazing. It uses mnemonics which relates the kana to a picture which helps you remember it better. It also makes it fun and easier!email: coolcat70@earthlink.net

  • Kristie:)

    Hello everyone!!!!!!!!!!! :) Here are the websites I recommend!!!!!!! The first website I recommend is…… Lang 8! I find this website very, very helpful for learning Japanese. I love this website because I can actually practice using Hiragana and Katakana. Japanese people can also check my work and make sure it is right. I also find it fun to help japanese and other people learn english too! :) The Second website I recommend is…… Real Kana I like this website because it actually quized me on my Hiragana and Katakana! I didn’t have to make flashcards or anything! I think this website is great for someone who is just starting out in Japanese.*Oh, and by the way…. A book that isn’t in the list of recommendations is Pict-O-Graphix by Michael Rowley. To people who are starting to learn Hiragana and Katakana this book is amazing. It uses mnemonics which relates the kana to a picture which helps you remember it better. It also makes it fun and easier!email: coolcat70@earthlink.net

  • hiddentwilight

    I recommend Mango (which I’ve accessed through my local library. It’s a great service especially if you don’t want to break the bank with Rosetta Stone), Japanese Pod (a great way just to keep the sounds of Japanese in my ears when I’m too busy to study) and Rikaichan (probably one of the most helpful things my computer can do). I’ve heard great things about Genki too, but I haven’t had the opportunity to personally utilize it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000106870606 Ngu Yen

    I recommended textfugu, skritter, mango languages, and read the kanji. Because, come on, all of these are well organized and simply awesome. 
    Skritter lets you get pretty much hands on, and I’m a kinesthetic learner so they really helps me memorize kanji easier. Textfugu allows to you learn in a different way that is unusual and so much easier. Basically, all these tie together to make learning japanese so much easier. And I really enjoy using them.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Zerokeemu Kim McInally

    When I first looked at the article title an an picture provided I thought we were going to tell you who we liked best out of Bambi an Godzilla… I was totally gonna go Godzilla fangirl on y’all。。。

    Its nice that you are doing this and giving a prize to all who enter. The amount of replies has made my positive outlook on this competition plummet by 97% , but then I’ve more or less won with all the free stuff an awesome advice you’ve given out already ^_^.
    Iv’e recommended all the ones I’ve used, some are better than others but I’m like a sponge, I use anything an everything , I just jump from site to site devouring free resources that people are kind enough to provide, depending on what I need.
    Then go sit in the corner with my laptop, Anki, Remembering the Kanji, Japanese for Busy people an Japanese noise playing in the background. These are definitely what I use most an I’ve got the most out of and it works for me.
    I have so much to thank ANKI for,  I don’t need to say more we all know.
    Remembering the Kanji, because without it  I can’t recognise Kanji,  say I knew the word for compare…ひかく And I saw..比較 I wouldnt be able to connect the two, but thanks to RTK I know the first Kanji means compare and I know the word compare so now I can read it!. Theres a lot of uncertainty about this book but just try it, it works for me an it might work for others.
    Japanese for Busy People, its not overly explanatory, it’s just effective, starts simply and goes at a pace I can handle, I love the fact it includes vocab at the bottom. I enjoy working with this on my own, and I can just gain a little bit more knowledge about Japanese every time I decided to work through a page :D 
    Background noise, it can be annoying but I know it helps, I put things like movies on, because I can handle it better than constant music.  I find myself repeating the dialogue I’m idly hearing….though I’m worried I’m starting to sound like Light from Death note!
    Anyway that’s all from me, thanks guys :D Good luck every one!

    (pepper_the_vampire_bunny@hotmail.com) Haha <<<

  • Nori

    I love lang-8. It helps me fine tune my skills and get comments and recommendations from native speakers! I also love to help native speakers with their English! Great place to make friends!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1653687465 Matěj Voslař

    I recommended Anki. I think there isn’t a better way to learn my vocabulary. And for the finding of Anki I am grateful to tofugu, so it’s only fair to link back to this website ^^ I also told my friends on IRC and they like Anki too.
    msamyel@gmail.com

  • Peeter

    Picked Anki and Rikaichan. Anki’s a really neat flash card program that works nicely and Rikaichan is just very useful.

  • Anonymous

    My recommendations:

    Tae Kim`s  guide to learning japanese: Excellent for learning grammar from a japanese perspective way which help us understand the japanese culture in a better way. It also come with excersises and answers so you can know if you really understood the lesson. Great resource and it is translated in different languages! ^_^!

    Genki: There are a totall of 5 genki Books (2 with lessons, 2 workboos and 1 book with answers for all the excercises) It also comes with audios for the lessons books and the workbooks. It is a really useful material for self-learners. It also has nice pictures (I can`t see myself studying from a book without pictures or drawings because I am a very visual person).

    Anki: Really good resources for learning vocabulary and expressions. It suports images, sound and text wich allow to create really interesting a complete study cards. you can make your own decks or find decks other people studying the same have already made. With anki you review more the items you have more difficulties with, which is a great way to improve your retention.

    Japanese Graded Readers: It is not in the tofugu recommende resources page, but I think it should be added. There are diffrent levels and 3 volumes for each level. All the kanjis have furigana on them. It also comes with audios. Each volume have five mini-books with different stories. I am a big fan of greaded readers because it is so nice whe you reach certain level to be able to read a whole (eve though short) story in japanese that it boost your motivation and makes you feel that your studying is really paying off.

    I have a question about the e-mail thing: ¿Should I enter the comment as a “guest” so that you can see the e-mail?, ¿Or it is Ok the way I did it with the DISQUS account?

  • Animelover ( ^_^)o自自o(^_^ )

    wow O__O I’m sort of scared to say anything after going through that loooooong list of comments wouldn’t want to be the one going through it *coughhashiand/orkoichicough* anyway I recommended Textfugu because of how awesome it is at teaching and how much it makes sense I have been learning Greek with a teacher and, well, I know a lot more Japanese because of this textbook than I know Greek(I’ve been studying for three years already) oh and I especially love the funny little breaks you give us every once in a while like the I’m yours-kid on a ukulele, and Mr. Ando of the woods. I also like the game-ish resources you gave us, like Real Kana-I can actually practice hundreds of characters and still not be bored its amazing for someone with such a short attention span like me—(this is me)—> OTL I also like another resource that Textfugu introduced me to Usagi chan’s genki resource page:(http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/sheaa/projects/genki/index.html) and also I lastly recommended anki just because of all the stuff you could do with it. (ps. I recommended Anki in real life to my sister after I told her about learning Japanese with Textfugu and how cool it was, and she was totally jealous, sulking a little later saying “why can’t they do that for Chinese” she’s trying to learn Chinese with a teacher and sometimes gets really frustrated 

  • Ziern

    It’s not on the list, but I recommend http://translate.google.com/ as a helping tool to quickly translate some Japanese that you encounter during your learning.
    Again, it’s just a tool and not really a source for learning a language, but it has helped me a lot to communicate with language-exchange-partners.
    It helps them saying things in English, and it helps me understanding what they are trying to say.

    Keep in mind though that it often can be very inaccurate, or make you go lazy and just translate things instead of learning them, but it has helped me so much with staying in touch with friends that I just had to recommend it here.
    If I sense it’s telling me something inaccurate I can most of the times split sentences up, just translate the kanji’s or move words around a bit to get the general jist of the meaning.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=628203670 Jennings Jin

    I gotta say, I love

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=628203670 Jennings Jin

    Somehow that posted…. I like mango a lot because it moves quickly and because if you have a library, it’s easy to access. It’s kind of basic as far as learning methods go, but what works works right? Also Mangoes are tasty.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=628203670 Jennings Jin

    Somehow that posted…. I like mango a lot because it moves quickly and because if you have a library, it’s easy to access. It’s kind of basic as far as learning methods go, but what works works right? Also Mangoes are tasty.

  • remichan

    I recommended Tae Kim’s Guide as well as Rikaichan. Although all the resources have their merits, I find that these are the ones I use the most often. Tae Kim’s Guide is just such a richly extensive grammar resource. The fact that it’s basically a free online textbook always amazes me. It’s also offered as a free app which is fabulous as well. I love that it completely does away with romaji, eliminating the use of them as a crutch, which is always a bonus while learning Japanese. Tae Kim’s Guide does have a mouse over feature to help with this, however, Rikaichan takes it up another level.

    Rikaichan is fantastic to use at the same time. Rikaichan is more like a tool to use with the other online Japanese learning resources. It works so well in tandem to supplement your learning progress. It gives more detailed definitions than the Tae Kim mouse overs along with a list of possible translations that you can choose from based on the context of your text. I love how clean and organized the add-on is. It’s very streamlined, fast, easy to read, convenient, and doesn’t feel invasive even as a pop-up.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Christopher-Bearden/100002526018793 Christopher Bearden

    1) Genki – Although it maybe expensive the way it is written makes it very good for self learners.

    2) Remembering the Kanji – for its relatively basic and relatively easy way to under stand kanji and and its meaning from the simple Kanji to the more complex Kanji

    3) Realkana – a really simple and useful flash card site for reviewing Hiragana and Katakana.

    4)Tofugu’s Cheat Sheets – I could do all these individually but then you would have to read a wall of text for each he he he. One of the most helpful resources you can find around for aiding your learning of the language be it hiragana, katakana or the particles.  This would be my number one choice for study aids.

    (Email: christopher.bearden@live.com)

  • http://www.facebook.com/danielnyecarter Daniel Carter

    I recommended:

    Tae Kim’s Guide to Japanese – Such a great resource for Japanese enthusiasts of any level. Teaches Japanese grammar points in a very easy to follow manner.

    Anki – This is something everyone should use, kind of the obligatory recommendation.

    ReadTheKanji – I just really enjoy using read the Kanji, plus, when I get Kanji I don’t know I can use them to make an Anki deck, works so well!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1529417101 Josiah Fam

    I like to use Text fugu. It’s a great textbook to help learn Japanese. I also  use Anki Deck to learn too. I also like this site http://memrise.com The site is like a game for learning a language Its sort of like IKnow for free. :) I used it to learn my JP Vocab. So far I have  learned 1,000+ vocab words in a week. :D

  • Anonymous

    I recommended Japanese for Busy People. It is a bit business focussed, but having looked at loads of Japanese text books, this one seemed to do things in a sensible order and cover a lot of the basics. My only regret is buying the romaji version and not the kana version – I’d definitely have done that if I could to force me to learn hiragana and katakana!

    I haven’t tried Anki yet, but I’m probably going to download it today given all the comments here!

    (E-mail: simon at simonssite.com)

  • Anonymous

    I recommended Japanese for Busy People. It is a bit business focussed, but having looked at loads of Japanese text books, this one seemed to do things in a sensible order and cover a lot of the basics. My only regret is buying the romaji version and not the kana version – I’d definitely have done that if I could to force me to learn hiragana and katakana!

    I haven’t tried Anki yet, but I’m probably going to download it today given all the comments here!

    (E-mail: simon at simonssite.com)

  • Katie Jones

    I like textfugu because it keeps you motivated by making learning japanese fun (ie: the “Studying your passion”  chapter) and stops you from getting stuck/quitting.

    I think that textfugu had an overdose of pure awesome.

  • Fred Stiller

    I would say that for me the association of  Genki/Learn the Kanji/Anki is the magic formula to learn efficiently japanese. Those 3 resources combined are really great !!

  • Em.Am

    I learned to read hiragana & katakana thanks to the Textfugu charts. I have both of them featured in my Japanese Language Log (which is on my Evernote. It’s easy to throw everything in Evernote & it’s always there when you’re ready to study ^~^ ).

    The three sources I use the most right now are Denshi Jisho, Tae Kim’s Guide, and (free) Textfugu. Denshi Jisho allows me to find words that my beginner’s dictionary doesn’t have. I can read the word in the context of a sentence as well as look up the kanji components, which is convenient along with my Japanese Kanji and Kana book since additional details include which Kanji number it is. I am using Tae Kim’s Guide as a Japanese booster along with the free Textfugu before I invest in the forever plan. Between the two, Tae Kim has more examples while Textfugu is more personable.

    I like Anki because it actually encourages me to learn vocab (by leeching off of other people’s hard work) and it vaguely reminds me of a free version of the-website-currently-known-as-iKnow.

    RealKana initially helped me recognize hiragana faster, but now I use it to practice typing with a “Japanese keyboard”. There are games out there for that purpose, but RealKana helps develop muscle memory so I don’t have to look at the chart I have next to my computer that identifies which kana goes where.
     
    NihonShock’s Ultimate Cheat Sheet is just that: a cheat sheet that is ultimate. It’s a great reference, but it alone cannot teach you.

    I recommend Japanese the Manga Way for an intermediate student because you need a strong foundation before it can help you. I bought this book before I really started to use other sources, so I could only get about a dozen chapters in before I got lost. The way each example is broken down explains anything that may cause you to wonder. 
    This is longer than I planned. But I hope it helps someone :)

  • Carol Kollen

    Hi ! ^.^ All of these resources look GREAT, but out of the ones I have tried so far, I would highly recommend Japanese For Busy People, Genki 1, and Japanese the Manga Way !  All three of these books provide a different aspect of learning Japanese for a visual learner like myself.  Japanese For Busy People gets you right into everyday words and phrases and forces you to learn and use kana right away, and the exercises allow for the repetition I need for memoriation.  The book comes with a cd and you can hear the target dialogue, so it can be used even if you are not able to practice verbally with another person.  Genki 1 also has a lot of exercises and drawings to show  when and how to use the vocab and featured phrases. The format is easy to understand, and not too overwhelming for the beginner. Japanese the Manga Way is the ultimate for learning visually, especially if  you are already famliar with reading manga in English.  I like using the first two books together with this one !  

  • Cerobi

    Yah! Contest~

    After following kemuschican’s channel on youtube, reading reviews, and stalking the site itself as much as possible without actually buying anything, I’d say Textfugu.com is my #1 recommendation. As someone who has been trying to learn Japanese on my own for 3 years (and sadly has not gotten very far), it seems to be the godsend self-learners didn’t know they were looking for! Had I found this 3 years ago, I can’t imagine the amount of progress I would have made. It’s an entire community dedicated to learning Japanese. Simply wonderful.

    That said, I also recommended readthekanji.com as a #2, because one of the biggest reasons I haven’t gotten far in learning is the seemingly daunting task of learning kanji (though I just read the article on what not to do and will restart with some radicals asap!). There seemed to be so much, and so I shied away from the task. Readthekanji (the free account) has begun to make the journey much easier!

    I also recommended realkana.com (which also has a realkanji.com sister site!) and anki. Both are wonderful interactive memory resources any beginner learning Japanese should take full advantage of.

  • Deanneblue

    Anki is great because it is like flashcards but better because it helps you with using the ones you are worst at more and the ones you know like the back of you hand are show less.

  • Mark B.

    Mango Languages gets the job done, and is cheap, depending on where you live. A lot of libraries buy the program like mine did and make it available for free. Mango is great for travelers, as you start off just readily usable phrases instead of grammar points. A cool feature in mango is the ability to practice pronunciation side by side the native speaker audio track. You can record your voice with a microphone and then look at how the actual wavelength/amplitude compares to your recording. Another helpful aspect of mango is the color coded grammar parts that match the meanings of both the english and japanese sentences. This cleared a lot of the confusion about sentence order that I previously had.

  • http://www.tofugu.com/ Hashi

    About the email: You did it just fine, we got your email address :)

  • John

    What college do you go to? That’s the same series we used at Ohio State.

  • Lena

    He’s a Japanese language teacher at Ritsumeikan, and since I did a 1 year exchange there I met him :D:D It was so exciting!

  • Anonymous

    I recommend Japanese the Manga way. It’s the most helpful book I’ve come across. Japanese for Busy People was good, but a little too repetitive in the exercises. Japanese the Manga Way gives you everything you need to know. I encouraged my friend to buy it too and she likes it. Very useful book. ^.^

  • jacq

    I recommending the following things:

    – TextFugu (Of course): As a self-learner, it’s the only resource I’ve found that keeps me motivated and interested.  I especially like the method for learning kanji with ridiculous stories – I was skeptical at first, but it really works amazingly well!
    – Anki and AnkiMobile: I use this program everyday (especially on my iPhone) to practice the flash card sets from TextFugu.  Having the audio really helps me remember the words, and having it on my iPhone means I never have an excuse not to fit in some study.
    – JapanesePod101: I use this for practice understanding dialogue, and I used to really enjoy the podcasts, but I think in the more recent seasons, they have lost some of their personality, so I guess I especially recommend the earliest seasons.
    – Kotoba: Great Japanese dictionary – for free!
    -TextFugu’s Hiragana and Katakana charts: Great when you are just starting out learning kana.

    While I was looking through the resources I downloaded the following charts I hadn’t seen before, because they looked great (and you can never have too many charts)!

    – NihonShock’s Ultimate Japanese Cheat Sheet
    – Tofugu’s Japanese Particles Cheatsheet
    – Conjugation Cheatsheet

    Thanks!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Caroline-Elizabeth-Robinson/681638783 Caroline Elizabeth Robinson

    Tae Kim’s Guide was my recommendation. Not only is it free, but it is miraculous at working it’s way into the brain. It covers everything, from complex verb tenses to simple particles. I still remember stuff I learned on that site from three years ago, crystal clear. If you haven’t checked it out yet, Tae Kim is the way to go!

  • http://profiles.google.com/shahiirosan shahiir mizune

    tae kim’s…….the site’s ounds an look cool

  • http://profiles.google.com/dbn001 Daniel Bruno

    I really like RhinoSpike! The best audio resource!

  • Anonymous

    definitely JapanesePod101 :D!!!
    why?
    first, it’s mostly about listening
    聴解is really what i think is hardest when learning japanese.
    i always misunderstood people’s intention if they speak too fast.
    and that is why, listening would be more important for people who don’t really watch jap dramas or watch anime.
    I do watch anime now, but still, it is always better to learn the more polite way, which we call the ますけいbefore u learn anything that can be learned from animes.LOLXD
    and after i used japanese Pod 101 for the trail period, i think it’s really awesome to get to listen to people speaking japanese in a very practical way!!i mean, compared to other learning tools that have free conversations for u to listen from it, isn’t this so much more NATURAL?

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  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Anonymous

    IDK if this is late or not… but I thought I might as well do it anyway XD

    I reccomended: Textfugu, Anki, Nihonshock’s ultimate Japanese cheat sheet, and the Tofugu Japanese particles cheat sheet.

    Textfugu: I freaking love this *-*. Every lesson is fun and it’s never too much at one time. If you’re learning by yourself, this is an amaaaazing resource. I started using it before going to formal classes, and it had helped a lot!

    Anki: I even used this program for chemistry and math! I discovered it through this site and now I pretty much think it’s a gift from god…

    Nihonshock’s… : Super useful! The layout is clean and it’s super easy to go through for quick reference.

    Particles cheat sheet: Again, great for quick reference, especially when you’re doing your Japanese homework and you just CAN’T remember what that ONE particle does!

    That’s all~

    –Alice

  • Jalm0905

    I recommended Kotoba, Lang-8 and Japanese the Manga Way. Kotoba is a great app to have. You can use it on your iPod anywhere you go without WiFi so don’t worry about killing yourself just to find a location with free WiFi like McDonald’s. it’s great for searching various amounts of kanji, including how to right them and their onyomi and kunyomi readings. Lang-8 is perfect for asking native Japanese speakers questions about the language. They will correct your attempts to writing  in Japanese and you can help them with whatever language their learning like English. Who doesn’t love helping others? If you don’t, you’re heartless soul. Lastly, Japanese the Manga Way is simply a book that teaches you various concepts in the language of Japanese the Manga Way. I’m sure many of you love to look at pictures or read manga, especially manga about Japanese. It gives you explanations about many topics and you will definitely learn from it. 

    Email: jalm0905@verizon.net

  • Jalm0905

    I recommended Kotoba, Lang-8 and Japanese the Manga Way. Kotoba is a great app to have. You can use it on your iPod anywhere you go without WiFi so don’t worry about killing yourself just to find a location with free WiFi like McDonald’s. it’s great for searching various amounts of kanji, including how to right them and their onyomi and kunyomi readings. Lang-8 is perfect for asking native Japanese speakers questions about the language. They will correct your attempts to writing  in Japanese and you can help them with whatever language their learning like English. Who doesn’t love helping others? If you don’t, you’re heartless soul. Lastly, Japanese the Manga Way is simply a book that teaches you various concepts in the language of Japanese the Manga Way. I’m sure many of you love to look at pictures or read manga, especially manga about Japanese. It gives you explanations about many topics and you will definitely learn from it. 

    Email: jalm0905@verizon.net

  • Jalm0905

    Oh also Kotoba and Lang-8 are FREE resources. i know everyone loves the word free, so hopefully you’ll use them like I do.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=897300242 Andy Hong

    Tae Kim’s Japanese resource is great for polishing up on Japanese grammar. The contents are well-structured: each page contains all the possible forms for a particular grammar construct, so, for example, all the ways of creating the negative form of a word are all listed in one place. This is in contrast to most other resources, that will scatter this information across arbitrary “beginner-intermediate-advanced” categories.

    Denshi Jisho is a great springboard to start any search from. It supports romaji input, contains sentence examples, links to other dictionaries and search engines, and also provides search engine plugins for Firefox.

    RealKana helped me ace my Hiragana and Katakana tests in university after just 4 hours of use (not in one session, of course).

    Rikaichan (and its Chrome port, Rikai-kun) are just so, so easy to use. Hover over any Japanese word or phrase and see its meaning right away. What more can one ask for? Here’s an additional tip: You can use Rikaichan in plain-text documents as well, just open the document using Firefox (by dragging them from Windows Explorer to a Firefox window, for example).

    There’s no love to be had for Android users within the resources! I’m personally using these apps:
    JED – Japanese-English Dictionary for Android : http://www.umibouzu.com/jed/
    AnyMemo – Flashcard learning app : http://anymemo.org/

  • Tompe99

    WHO WON???

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    A bunch of folks! We emailed the winners about a week after this article was posted up.

  • Hisuke

    I just realised that these are all haikus. I’m a bit slow…