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Once again, I thought I’d stick with the Hawaii-Japan topic, since i just got back from there (that’s right, eat your hearts out).

In high school, all of us younguns had to do a Senior Report, of sorts. Now, whenever I do essays / reports / etc, and I have the opportunity to write about whatever I want (bad idea, teachers), I like to choose a topic that almost nobody else has studied, so the professor can’t check my facts. I’m not saying that I go around making stuff up, but I feel a little better when I’m not writing on something within the teacher’s field of expertise. It, how should I say, often results in a higher, how should I call it, grade.

Of course, as you can tell by the title, I decided to study Japanese internment. More specifically, how it affected Hawaii.

If you don’t know already, Hawaii’s population includes tons of Japanese. I’m not just talking tourists in khaki shorts with cameras around their necks. Back during the war, Hawaii’s population was 1/3 Japanese. That’s huge. 157,000 Japanese made their home on the islands. In contrast, the United States mainland only had around 126,000 Japanese. 100,000 of those 126,000 were put in internment camps. That’s a lot of people being put away for no reason.

Now, as you probably learned in history class (if you’re an American, at least), “All Japanese were put in internment camps.” That is, at least, what we are led to believe. The history books tend to gloss over Hawaii, though. What happened to people over there?

Well, not that much.

Of the 157,000 Japanese living in Hawaii, only under 2000 of them were put in internment camps. These were people of supposed power, who could “possibly pose a threat to America.” The ironic thing is, though, Japanese-Americans on the mainland posed a much smaller risk compared to their Hawaii counterparts. Over half of the Japanese-Americans on the mainland were born in America and had American citizenship, yet they were the ones to get interned. They were forced to sell their land on the cheap (Japanese owned a lot of California grape growing land, all of which they lost. Sad, yeah?), and lost pretty much everything (My family’s sword was taken. Bastards!).

In Hawaii, however, almost everyone got off scott free. I’m not saying that anyone should have been interned – I think it was a terrible thing – but they should have at least been consistent about it. Really, the Japanese in Hawaii had much closer ties to Japan than those in the mainland. Still, in the end, it was all economy-based. If you suddenly lose 1/3 of your population, then the economy will implode on itself. According to my grandpa, a lot of Japanese ran banks and worked on farms at the time, so suddenly cutting them out of the economic equation would have been disastrous.

That is why Japanese didn’t get interned in Hawaii, even though more Japanese lived in Hawaii than any other part of the US.

Jokes on America, though. I hear stories about my Great Grandma during the war. She would walk around the streets of Nu’uanu, picking up cigarette packaging and pulling out the aluminum linings, then send it back to Japan so they could make weapons and bombs. On top of that, she went around to all her neighbors and friends (who apparently were pro Japanese, as well) and got them to put stitches into hachimaki, which were sent to Japan for kamikaze bombers to wear for good luck. Great job, America! Way to intern the right people.

Though, I would be sad if my Great Grandma was interned, she was just a sweet old lady picking up trash for those dirty cigarette smoking sailors. How nice!

  • fredydb327

    “Farewell To Manzanar” I had to read that in high school. I think. Yeah, I did. Sophomore year. Short sentence. I was still reading books that year. By senior year I did not even read the sparknote. Just listened in class. Thanks to IB, I’m done with English forever. Unless I want to go to graduate school and maybe I’ll need more English then.
    Japanese internment is a very interesting topic and I always wondered about Hawaii but surprisingly never looked it up.

  • http://tofugu.com Tofugu_Erin

    “My family’s sword was taken. Bastards!”

    Do you know who you sound like here? Think about it, haha.

  • MidgarZolom

    “My family’s sword was taken. Bastards!”

    My grandmother gave away the family sword to some movers while my dad was growing up. My grandfather was in the military so they moved around a lot. You know women, she probably thought it was dangerous or something. I always thought it would have been sweet to have that thing.

  • http://tofugu.com Tofugu_Erin

    “You know women”, eh?

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    Hey now, stop taking away my fun

  • http://tofugu.com Tofugu_Erin

    Haha, it sounds just like him.

    Neat-o article, though!

  • http://caitlinomara.com Caitlin

    Did the US government heavily monitor the Japanese population for communications to Japan, or was it as easy as it seems for your great-grandmother to mails supplies back?

  • djarno

    Beware of Grandma Tojo! Do your patriotic duty and dispose of your cigarette boxes properly.

    But, honestly, does a hachimaki really require that much work?

  • http://www.youtube.com/user/CHESTERlikesSUBARU Chester_King

    Two words……..

    Midget submarine.

    .

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    I feel like she must have been doing it before the war was between America and Japan, since there was a good several years for her to do it before communications were (probably) cut off. Though, I could be wrong, maybe they had ways to send things, considering how Japanese the Hawaii population was. That’s a good question, and I don’t know how to answer it :(

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    Well, it requires a thousand stitches for good luck, preferably one from each person, but I doubt she would have been able to pull something like that off.

  • Livvi_Spatula

    “She would walk around the streets of Nu’uanu, picking up cigarette packaging and pulling out the aluminum linings, then send it back to Japan so they could make weapons and bombs.”

    Did a lot of Japanese people actively (for a certain value of active :P ) support Japan during WW2?

  • http://youtube.com/profile?user=chokudori クリス

    I was thinking of the same book when I saw this article in my RSS Feed. Decent book, unfortunately I had to read it twice while in school; once in high school and a second time in my first year of college.

  • http://youtube.com/profile?user=chokudori クリス

    Reading this makes me want to go back to Hawaii and visit the memorial at Pearl Harbor, then maybe stop by the swap meet at Aloha Stadium (^∇^) I need some new shorts.

    To keep this Hawaii x Japanese theme going, how about mentioning the Japanese influence on Hawaiian cuisine, spam musubi anyone? ( ̄ー ̄)ニヤリ~

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    Kinda wrote about that over on koichiben:
    http://www.koichiben.com/2008/07/hawaii-no-oish

    but, i definitely don’t feel qualified to talk about this…maybe erin will, since she’s the one who actually lives there 0_o

  • http://youtube.com/profile?user=chokudori クリス

    Yea, I noticed the article a couple weeks ago, but couldn’t fully comprehend it all because my kanji reading skills still sucks( ̄へ ̄*)but then again, I’ve had my fair share of dining in Hawaii, so I can some-what relate.

    And for the record, Matsumoto’s shave ice is the business, anyone says otherwise, ‘yo mama’. The only thing bad about Matsumoto’s is that the lines can sometimes get long.

  • St

    Well, besides the economic aspect of interning one third of your population, there are four other reason why Japanese-Americans were not put into internment camps
    1. Less anti-Asian sentiment compared to the states on the west coast
    2. No statehood, meaning no outlet for existing anti-Japanese sentiment on the federal level
    3. Hawaii was already under martial law since december 7th 1941, so there was no perceived need for any special meassures.
    4. The persons involved. Delos Emmons, commanding general in Hawaii, seems to have operated on the assumption that Japanese-Americans were loyal citizens. His counterpart on the west coast, general John DeWitt, on the other hand was much more racist, assuming that loyalty was determined by ancestral blood ties, hence that Japanese-Americans were disloyal.

    “Did a lot of Japanese people actively (for a certain value of active :P ) support Japan during WW2?” In all seriousness, there wasn’t a single case of Japanese-Americans sabotaging the US war effort or actively supporting Japan during the entire war.

  • St

    “My family’s sword was taken. Bastards!”

    Oh you mean that’s your family’s swords my family has been using as an oversized toenail clipper for the last half century?

  • emiko

    reminds me of ‘farwell to manzanar’

  • http://otakuinternational.com BZou

    Wow, I never knew about this thing dealing in Hawaii, the history books in school really did skip over this whole chapter. And yeah it was a horrible thing that the Japanese on mainland America was forced to give up their lives just because of some paranoid white folks in government.

  • WOTDsctoo

    That was very informative!

    I think writing about things your teachers (or other people for that matter) don’t know much about is a good idea. In addition to possibly scoring higher, it makes the report seem like it actually has a point. Regurgitation of commonly known things, like reports are usually done, just feels so weightless. More original reports/investigations are more fulfilling!!!

    Anyway, your grandmother was a sneaky one. The sword wielding relatives should have lived with her in Hawaii.

  • C

    St is correct. Not a single American of Japanese ancestry was ever charged with sabotage/treason/etc. Internment was racist bullshat of the highest order. There was never any “military necessity” for it, and the people in charge knew it too.

  • DudeB

    Good job on doing your research. There is a lot of history that public schools do not teach us. In fact, most of the stuff they don’t teach us is all the good stuff. I myself am an Asian-American studies minor and have done a lot of personal research on many Asians Americans and their heritage as well as our history here in America. Good job sir.

  • Fitzy

    Is this the paper you wrote for Mr. Wolf?

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    I don’t think so … I can’t remember which teacher it was, but it was the IB paper we had to do. Maybe this was at the end of middle school and not high school… I think I may have switched parts of my life up, come to think of it…though, I’m pretty sure it was for some IB class, and it was some research thing everyone had to do, which doesn’t sound very middle schooly. Who knows, memory has gone downhill. We old man, we old.

  • Fitzy

    It must have been, since you took off to Japan after that and then you just had regular non-IB classes for the most part when you came back. I think… I just remember making retarded busy work papers in his class and we had to use the CIA factbook all the time >.>

    I also totally thought I would be smarter then I was 10 years ago, but I still have the attention span of a 13 year old sadly… There was a pinnacle I think at around 19, totally lost it now. Good thing I’m going into film, blame everything on the producers and go from there.

  • http://www.tofugu.com Viet

    Hahaha Mr. Wolf. The guy could totally have yakuza street cred if he cut off his broken pinky.

  • http://www.vietamins.com Viet

    Hahaha Mr. Wolf. The guy could totally have yakuza street cred if he cut off his broken pinky.

  • karab1n3r_k90

    i know the reason!
    because the japanese may know the top secret things
    confidential missions and they may know what will the army and the opposing army do…

  • Ana_chan

    Thanks for pointing this out, I'm not sure I like the “you know women” part either.

  • Ana_chan

    I'm no feminist, but I'm not sure I liked the “you know women” part either.

  • Kristen

    Very late, but I am glad you wrote about this! My family was interned during WW2 and such. But I work in a “Nikkei Traditions” gift shop that sells a documentary about why the Japanese Americans in Hawaii were not interned.

    I find it very cool that something like this was posted! There aren't too many people out there who know about it.

  • JackTamaki

    My school has the IB Program too! I'm a senior this year, and my extended essay topic is why internment was handled differently in Hawaii, focusing on the economic factors. I wrote a paper on internment a few years ago in a non-IB class, so this seemed like a natural next step. It's going to be about 14 pages long, but I wonder if I can keep it that short. Hahaha. It's really interesting, so I'm having fun with all of my research. :)

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  • vintage_natalia

    At my college we hosted International education week. I had a table set up and had random students answer basic trivia about the world. This just reminded me of a students answer. Someone thought pearl harbor was in japan. He he :)

  • Digger

    I picked this topic for a school paper, too. Mainly because the school wasn't going to teach anything about it (shock, shock).

  • megan

    my grandma, a full blooded japanese, was living in hawaii at the time with her father, mother and sister. she was originally from stockton california because her father, kenso nushida, was playing baseball. i dont know if you heard of him. but she moved to hawaii when she was ten and the bombing came a year later. but she had family on her mother, jane fujishige's, side living in california. my great-great-grandfather,( i forget his name, but it started with a T) was one of the cooks at the camp in arizona. he had to sell his farm. im not too sure about the story, but i know that he was a good cook and everybody liked his food. unfortunately, he died there.
    my grandmother, iris nushida, said that they were going to intern the japanese in hawaii to molokai, but it never happened. the japanese had it tough in hawaii also. i mean, the government took away all their stuff in the house, my grandma was called a Jap by some navy boy, and during school, they felt a separation between the haoles(white kids) and the japanese.
    anyway, i really liked what you wrote and it kinda reminded me of that book under the blood red sun, you might have heard of it, but just the part about the sword. haha.
    i totally get what your'e saying, im just saying, in hawaii, it wasnt paradise for them.

  • dosanco

    Or maybe Japanese in Hawai'i weren't sent to camps because Hawai'i wasn't even a part of the US! The “mainland” as you were calling it was the only land. Hawai'i didn't become a state until 1959–4 years after the war.

  • Joyce

    My interest in the topic was renewed after my recent visit to the Noguchi Museum in Queens, Long Island, NY. Amazing Japanese-American, actually a citizen of the world and an artist ahead of his time. As a New Yorker, he was exempt from internment but nevertheless ASKED to be interned in Arizona. It took him 4 months to talk his way out again. I am learning Japanese in anticipation of my retirement from Europe to the Big Island.

  • mmmkikuniku

    Heey, saw this a year too late. But as a side note, I've hypothesized that Japanese Americans living in Hawaii during WWII can to some extent still speak Japanese because there was less anti- Japanese sentiment compared to the mainland. (being 1/3 of the population on an island helps!). Us mainland Japanese Americans can't speak Japanese for crap! Plus we still call the otearai. . benjo. Haha.

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  • Sean D

    The reason the Japanese were not interned in Hawaii has nothing to do with economics. And they did NOT run banks at that time. Check your facts. Hawaii and Hawaiians had a very different view on race, culture and what it meant to be an American which is why the Japanese-American forces came from that specific Island, while Japanese elsewhere were refused entry into the military.

  • Kaleo

    Are you naive, stupid, or both? Your “great-grandmother” did nothing of the kind. That nonsense about sending aluminum foil to Japan is an old urban myth in Hawaii.

    You owe the Japanese in Hawaii, your great-grandmother (or was it your grandmother? You could not get it straight on the BBC), and the BBC an apology for your story.

  • Kaleo

    Are you naive, stupid, or both? Your “great-grandmother” did nothing of the kind. That nonsense about sending aluminum foil to Japan is an old urban myth in Hawaii.

    You owe the Japanese in Hawaii, your great-grandmother (or was it your grandmother? You could not get it straight on the BBC), and the BBC an apology for your story.

  • samboy888

    japanese is very diverse, the japanese from hawaii is completely different human to those from main city of japan. Is great to see a part of nice, kind hearted japanese remains over in hawaii as during the world war, or even prior, when japan invaded so many asian country, it wasn't that good, and more worst when the 1st official human scientific experiment organisation unit 731 formed by the japanese, killing millions of civilians of from other races then japan, the nanking mass-killing….it was hard to like the japanese, i heard stories from friends grand parents from china, korea, and it was awful. but i find that any races, there are the bad ones, and good ones, and am glade the nice japanese blood line get pass on in hawaii.

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  • Colin

    Actually the article writers right. It was highly based upon economics. (Hawaiian Japanese American) But true, I highly doubt much Japanese Americans ran banks of that sort. Only the buddhist monks types or the Japanese national types were interned in Hawaii. Besides that the Japanese were left alone. Yup culture was very different even when comparing Hawaii Japanese to mainland Japanese. Both have very rich backgrounds from Hawaiian Japanese working on the plantations while the mainland Japanese being interned. Hawaiian Japanese also have the knowledge of pidgin english a hawaii dialect. (pidgin english is a combination of all languages on the island). Hawaiian Japanese and mainland Japanese are very much different and similar. I do know that many Hawaiian Japanese and myself consider ourselves more Hawaiian Japanese than “American” Japanese. It may confuse people who are not from Hawaii but I am sure the author may understand from being raised here. There seems to be a different mindset in my opinion. I could go on and on about the differences and internment but there is just to much culture involved. (further information citizens of Hawaii are also a type of Hawaiian by definition). Not to say mainland Japanese are not important they certainly are. Huge culture from both sides I just know much more about my culture than the American Japanese culture.
    I have talked to many relatives and their explanation of their history is very different from my side. Oh but non the less Japanese were looked down upon in Hawaii also. I am not sure how much but that is what I know from my understanding. People would refer to my parents as young kids as “Japs” which back in the day was an extremely racist term. My parents and grandparents, etc. still get offended. I do not feel that offended by it. Hardly at all it was just a term I am sure all Japanese can relate to.
    Anyway that “great grandma” incident is pretty funny. I never really heard of the pro Japanese Americans especially from Hawaii that was interesting. My great grandparents would just send clothes after the war. Great blog! Oh and I am not sure about this but I do know Hawaiian Japanese are third generation +. I am fifth myself. grandparents can't even speak Japanese much. Thats how plantation worker my family was. I would like to know if American Japanese Americans are like that also. The generation part. There are so little Japanese in America i have met compared to Hawaii. Would be interesting to know. There opinion on Hawaiian Americans like myself too

  • Kaleo

    The story about his great-grandma is not “funny”; it is just stupid. That nonsense about foil is a urban myth and should not be perpetuated.

  • zooms

    lol Kaleo I would think they would think its funny because its so stupid? but yah it sounds stupid.

  • Samantha

    I wrote a paper on how Japanese internment affected Canada :D

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    Samantha [Moderator] 3 weeks ago
    I wrote a paper on how Japanese internment affected Canada :D

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_5JKBIAWLHRC264GPBJKVXKPAX4 Barnabas Sackett

    I’m just wondering what sort of underground system existed to get balls of aluminum from Hawaii to Japan in a cost effective manner? For that matter, how did the hachimaki get to the pilots? Was there regular postal service?

  • Pingback: America's Racist Japanese People Hunting Dogs Of Cat Island()

  • Frblarney

    I’m a tourguide in San Francisco. A tattooed young man called Tanaka claimed that his Japanese grandfather had been interned in Hawaii during the war. I said, “That’s interesting. As far as I have read, FDR tried to get them interned over there, but since they were one-third of the population, the economy would have collapsed, so the Congress blocked his order, whereas in California and West Coast generally, FDR rammed it through; about 128,000 were interned after Pearl Harbor.” He replied, “Well, he was interned”. A Navy officer from Australia, retired, said that perhaps his grandfather had been a special case – either important economically or had broken a law and went to a special camp-prison for Japanese nationals set up at that time. The young man looked startled that two at the lunchtable had any inkling of such things, or challenged his story a bit.

    Young people who hear stories from their old folks never quite get the whole story straight, because often the old folks sugarcoat the bad stuff or exaggerate it to a kind of hell, whichever way. Only when someone questions them, does their curiosity arise. So people, when you get out there in the world and hear all kinds of personal stories passed on from early generations to this new and young one, ask them very specific questions. No one did ask the young man, but one could ask, “What year was that? How old was he? DId he still have Japanese citizenship? How long in Hawaii? What was the name of the camp? Which Island? How long was he in the camp? Was it all males or mixed genders?” These questions appear to be rude, perhaps, but the young person was bringing up the subject in the first place, inviting an interest in his poor grandpa by the listeners.

    Dennis Quaid stars in a film about an American-Irish New Yorker, a young man, falling in love with a Japanese-American woman in Los Angeles. They married, had children, moved to Seattle, she stopped working and stayed home, and they lived off his manual labor jobs in the 1930’s, namely, a fish-packing plant job. He was a socialist, a rabblerouser and hothead, and the next thing you know, he was in big trouble, while she and the kids were packed off to an internment camp. He visited her there, hoping to get her out as her husband, but all Japanese-Americans there, the older folks, plus the American campguard, advised him that since anti-Japanese feelings were very strong during the war, esp. on the coast, that they’d be safer for the duration interned there. He had to concede the point.

    VEry well done film – what was the name, with actors portrayed the patient and wise internees very well. Look up Dennis Quaid!

    In any case, it was not the case in Hawaii, apparently…

    Mary McGreevey

  • Frblarney

    If I know anything about women (since I am one), I would wager that the husband got rid of it, since “you know men” – men know better what a sword can do in a moment of rage; they’re the ones using them. He may have buried it, hid it elsewhere than the house, or needed cash and went to a pawnship with it. In any case, you know men! They blame women for the things they’re ashamed they did!!!
    Uh, just joking. I don’t think all men are alike. Humans as a whole LOVE to blame other people, especially the opposite gender, how handy! And don’t forget racism, another good blame game!

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  • Jesus Freak

    This helps! i have to teach my class on this with a group so this info is goooood stuff :)

  • Strungoutjunky

    Yeah your great grandma supported genocide in china and the nationalistic death of millions of its own. You should be proud of her.

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    Her and every other Japanese person of that time supported the Japanese side during the war in some way… why blame me for that? Pretty sure there isn’t a family in existence that wasn’t involved in some way with some kind genocide in the past, yours included, but I wouldn’t blame you for anything anyone in your family has done…? Or, even if it isn’t blame we’re talking about, there’s no point in attacking someone’s family, no? People tend to like their relatives…

  • neildingman

    Interesting article. War sucks big time. I saw a documentary on the internments on the mainland. What was interesting were the camps in Arkansas. The Japanese-Americans transported there were shocked at the poverty and lack of education in rural Arkansas. In fact, they felt sorry for the Arkansas folks because of their state of poverty and tried to help them out, when they could. The whole thing was just messed up. The folks in rural Arkansas even expressed jealousy towards the Japanese-Americans because they were paid better, educated better and feed better. Amazing how things were just messed up all the way around.

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    i heard stories from friends grand parents from china, korea, and it was awful. but i find that any races, there are the bad ones, and good ones, and am glade the nice japanese blood line get pass on in hawaii.

  • Anne

    Hawaii was not a state during ww2 just a territory.  It only became a state in 1959.  Therefore, I suspect the US gov’t and the law for internment actually didn’t/couldn’t apply there.  Let alone the powers that be who knew interning all the japanese there would kill the economy, the agriculture, the merchant class, etc.

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    That’s a good point, for sure.

  • Voila_adeline

    http://www.hawaiiinternment.org/history-of-internment ,,,,There were interment camps in hawaii….

  • http://www.tofugu.com koichi

    Compared to the number of Japanese living in Hawaii though, it was almost nobody. Fewer than 2000 out of 157,000 total, I think it was.

  • Wps

    Grandmother could not possibly have sent anything to Japan from Hawaii during the war.  Must be a family legend, but can’t be true.

  • Kathy Warth

    My family had vineyards in the San Joaquin Valley – and thanks to caucasian friends, managed to return to their land after the war.

  • Ignoranceiscostly

    Yeah ok….your opinion is a little uninformed. Heads of the Japanese community were targeted for interment in Hawaii including one who served on the senate. The numbers of internees were less in Hawaii but more targeted including Buddhist priests, prominent business and community leaders. Many Japanese families were relocated to the mainland from Hawaii. They could not inter 40% of the population because they had just been bombed and would have lost to much of the work force….Honouliuli (you have a picture of the interment camp in your blog) . As for cultural items many families in Hawaii hid or destroyed them out of fear of being taken away and interred with the rest. They wanted no association with anything Japanese to prove their loyalty…sad really to loose such things.(no one knew where they went) A lot of the work is still being done on these camps, there was 12 to 14 around the Hawaiian islands, most have been located. Honouliuli is in the process of being placed on the National Register. Martial Law was declared in Hawaii after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii was still a US territory and not yet a state….as for grandma aiding the war effort from Hawaii? Have you been to Nagasaki? I have, nuff said. A lot interred were given the choice to join the military and fight for the US, they too received hachimaki from family members. Don’t kid yourself the Japanese community in Hawaii was very hard hit culturally & economically. I think your interpretation of events needs a little more background and accurate information. (If you got your info from the HI JCC you missed out on some important points)

  • Toshiyori

    Thank you so much for this insight into American history! May Amida bless your dear grandmother. Please look at Vol. XV, Leaf 55, of The Organ for the Universal Buddhist League (http://organubl.wordpress.com) and find Toshiyori’s observations at bottom.

  • Kaii

    My grandmother lived in Hawaii (she is Japanese) during WWII. She saw her best friend being raped by American soldiers…sooo…yeeahhh…

  • Freejahaja

    Thats not true, they actually had a japanese division in the U.S military, who were sent out to do the most dangerous missions, but their attitude was “im proud to be american, I want to make america realize it can be proud of me” so they actually did really well. Kind of like how amazing the african american fights were in the civil war. But not quite.

  • Freejahaja

    Hey, if the paraniod japanese dicks didnt bomb us first, maybe we wouldnt have had to retaliate, and would have actually kept out of the war.

  • JT

    The Japanese were interned in Hawaii. See the new documentary film, “The Untold Story, Internment of Japanese Americans in Hawaii”. There were camps all over the islands. I think the biggest was Honouliuli. The FBI used picked people, mostly community leaders from a Custodial Detention/ABC List, a list developed years before the war. I think there were about 2300 taken away; mostly men. Isseis were sent to Santa Fe, New Mexico on the mainland and the rest on islands in Hawaii. your title is a bit misleading. These people were often shunned when they returned by other Japanese for fear that they would be found guilty by association.

  • CK Thiruvathukal

    Why should an American citizen have to prove allegiance. I am sorry to say this, but you sound like you are are holding onto prejudice. Don’t blame the writer. He is just expressing opinions and didn’t commit genocide. America has plenty of crap it has done, including genocide…yes!

  • meow

    no

  • meow

    you are wrong

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    just stop

  • jerseydave

    I’m pretty sure he was kidding. There’d be no way for her to get the aluminum foil to Japan.

  • Hitokiri 1989

    I don’t understand how your grandmother could have sent those packages during the war. Wasnt that sort of communication cut off during wartime? Also wouldn’t the US authorities check any outbound packages to Japan, an enemy nation?

  • Jakub Skowron

    Hawaii wasn’t a state at the time. Maybe Japanese were interned in the _states_ only?

  • Sogno

    I highly doubt every Japanese person at the time supported Japan. I’m sure there were some, but those born on American soil and especially those who, you know, served in the AMERICAN army as AMERICAN citizens and died for AMERICA, did not support the country that bombed their homeland. Which was America.